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By Trudy Rubin | September 1, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- A year ago, on a trip to China, I wrote about a blind legal activist who was challenging the use of forced abortions and sterilizations in his province. Chen Guangcheng had the audacity to try to organize a class-action lawsuit by peasants against local officials, arguing that Chinese law banned such population-control methods. When I left Beijing in September, Mr. Chen had been beaten and put under house arrest. Last week, he was sentenced to four years in prison on charges of "organizing a mob" to disturb traffic and "willfully damaging property."
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NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 1, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- A year ago, on a trip to China, I wrote about a blind legal activist who was challenging the use of forced abortions and sterilizations in his province. Chen Guangcheng had the audacity to try to organize a class-action lawsuit by peasants against local officials, arguing that Chinese law banned such population-control methods. When I left Beijing in September, Mr. Chen had been beaten and put under house arrest. Last week, he was sentenced to four years in prison on charges of "organizing a mob" to disturb traffic and "willfully damaging property."
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NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 20, 2005
BEIJING -- One of the most exciting developments in China is the rising awareness at the grass-roots level that ordinary people have legal rights. Chinese law has long been used as a tool to help the Communist Party control the people; call it rule by law, not rule of law. But the country's staggering pace of growth has spawned all kinds of injustices, including a huge gap between rich and poor fueled by government corruption. The population is looking for redress. A few years ago, ordinary Chinese would have suffered in silence, afraid to raise their voices.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 20, 2005
BEIJING -- One of the most exciting developments in China is the rising awareness at the grass-roots level that ordinary people have legal rights. Chinese law has long been used as a tool to help the Communist Party control the people; call it rule by law, not rule of law. But the country's staggering pace of growth has spawned all kinds of injustices, including a huge gap between rich and poor fueled by government corruption. The population is looking for redress. A few years ago, ordinary Chinese would have suffered in silence, afraid to raise their voices.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 21, 1997
BEIJING -- China continues to violate its citizens' rights to worship freely, but the worst forms of persecution, such as long prison sentences and beatings, appear to be have decreased in recent years, an international monitoring organization said yesterday."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 13, 1994
BEIJING -- U.S. Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher's first meetings here yesterday were marked by biting rebuke rather than progress on the festering Sino-American dispute over human rights.In the morning, Chinese Foreign Minister Qian Qichen accused a senior U.S. official of interfering in China's internal affairs, being disrespectful and breaking Chinese law -- all by meeting two weeks ago with China's best-known dissident, Wei Jingsheng.Mr. Qian said the meeting had "deeply disappointed" Chinese leaders and "cast a shadow" over Mr. Christopher's visit, according to Wu Jianmin, the Chinese spokesman.
NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - Internet giant Yahoo Inc. had to pass documents to the Chinese government that led to the conviction of a local journalist because the company must follow local laws, co-founder Jerry Yang said yesterday. Reporters Without Borders, a Paris-based media rights group, accused Yahoo last week of helping Chinese authorities to convict Shi Tao, a reporter for the daily Dangdai Shang Bao. Tao was sentenced in April to 10 years in prison for sending a Chinese government memo about the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre to foreign Web sites, the group said.
NEWS
By Sheryl WuDunn and Sheryl WuDunn,New York Times News Service | January 20, 1991
BEIJING -- They are only tiny trial notices, scribbled on pieces of paper that crackle in the wind on a board outside the Intermediate People's Court, but they suggest that China now hopes to write the last chapter in the chronicles of the 1989 Tiananmen democracy movement.While the world is absorbed by the crisis in the Persian Gulf, China is putting on trial the boldest and most prominent students and intellectuals who were the backbone of the democracy movement.Nine people have been sentenced so far, drawing punishment ranging from suspended sentences to up to four years in prison, and 14 more are now on trial or awaiting sentences.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 25, 2003
Steadily, stealthily, The Eye works its way into your psyche, playing with your mind and always keeping a surprise or two up its sleeve. It's a supernatural shocker that owes its chills to the tried-and-true notion that what goes around, comes around. Twenty-year-old Mun (Lee Sin-Je) has been blind since age 2 but is about to undergo a corneal transplant that promises to restore her vision. It works and her eyes begin to function. But she can't really see yet; her brain can't process the pictures it suddenly is receiving.
NEWS
By MARK MAGNIER and MARK MAGNIER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2006
BEIJING -- Chinese railway authorities have launched an all-out attack on "yellow bulls" in and around their 5,700 train stations nationwide. While the term evokes some new strain of hoof-and-mouth disease, it is, in fact, a century-old Chinese term for ticket scalpers. "Even the cooks on our trains have been called to the front lines to fight yellow bulls," said Jiang Zhanlin, director of the Railway Ministry's police department. "We're prepared to fight as long as it takes." The Railway Ministry has announced an anti-yellow bull "Blue Shield Action" campaign, in and around Chinese New Year, the busiest holiday of the year, which begins tomorrow.
NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - Internet giant Yahoo Inc. had to pass documents to the Chinese government that led to the conviction of a local journalist because the company must follow local laws, co-founder Jerry Yang said yesterday. Reporters Without Borders, a Paris-based media rights group, accused Yahoo last week of helping Chinese authorities to convict Shi Tao, a reporter for the daily Dangdai Shang Bao. Tao was sentenced in April to 10 years in prison for sending a Chinese government memo about the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre to foreign Web sites, the group said.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 21, 1997
BEIJING -- China continues to violate its citizens' rights to worship freely, but the worst forms of persecution, such as long prison sentences and beatings, appear to be have decreased in recent years, an international monitoring organization said yesterday."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 13, 1994
BEIJING -- U.S. Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher's first meetings here yesterday were marked by biting rebuke rather than progress on the festering Sino-American dispute over human rights.In the morning, Chinese Foreign Minister Qian Qichen accused a senior U.S. official of interfering in China's internal affairs, being disrespectful and breaking Chinese law -- all by meeting two weeks ago with China's best-known dissident, Wei Jingsheng.Mr. Qian said the meeting had "deeply disappointed" Chinese leaders and "cast a shadow" over Mr. Christopher's visit, according to Wu Jianmin, the Chinese spokesman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2003
BEIJING - Police said yesterday that they had detained a half-dozen people in connection with reports that hundreds of Japanese tourists in a southern city recently hired hundreds of local prostitutes and staged a public display of promiscuity on a sensitive anniversary in Sino-Japanese relations. Details remain sketchy of what is alleged to have been a three-day sex romp at a luxury hotel in Zhuhai in mid-September, but that has not diminished an outpouring of invective against Japan on China's Internet chat sites or unusually racy articles in the state-controlled press.
NEWS
April 29, 2004
SEVEN YEARS ago, when Britain ended its 150 years of colonial reign over Hong Kong by ceding the South China economic dynamo to Chinese rule, Beijing promised a continuation of the territory's laissez-faire capitalism, civil liberties and way of life for 50 years. It vowed not to impose socialism. But China did not promise Hong Kong full-fledged democracy or complete self-rule, and this week it sharply reminded the world of that -- and of the ultimate meaning of law in China. The Basic Law, the Hong Kong quasi-constitution framed by Sino-British negotiators in advance of the city's 1997 handover, only held out the possibility of direct popular election of its chief executive and of its legislature and other political reforms sometime after 2007 -- as an ultimate aim. At the time, if such deliberately vague promises reasonably provoked a lot of skepticism, they also were tinged with some hope.
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