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By Janene Holzberg | December 11, 2013
As Grace Lee Chou rang a brass school bell by hand in the hallways of Loch Raven High School on a recent Sunday afternoon, television sets in many area homes were tuned into the Ravens game and families were busy with typical weekend activities. But six first- and second-graders were soon hard at work in a classroom, repeating letters and consonant blends in unison as their teacher, Julie Liu, pointed to them one by one on a chalkboard. The children were competing to see who could recite the letters the loudest and who could get the most correct, a scene common in schools the world over.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
As the nation observes Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month in May, students and staff at a scholastic program in Columbia can boast that they highlight Chinese heritage year round. Each Sunday, they gather at Howard Community College in Columbia for Howard County Chinese School, a program that offers lessons on Chinese language and culture for students in kindergarten through the 10th grade, as well as for adults. Launched in 1998 with about 80 students, the school has grown to about 1,000 school-age enrollees and 400 adults, and has a faculty that includes instructors who taught at schools in China.
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NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 11, 1991
XIAMEN, China -- After three years studying Chinese at Baltimore's City College, an endless trans-Pacific flight, a rough voyage through the tail end of a typhoon from Hong Kong and three weeks of living in this sometimes strange land, Vhonda Williams had only one thing on her mind."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Chieh "Jeffrey" Huang, a retired civil engineer who was a founder of the Chinese Language School of Baltimore, died Jan. 21 of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 78. Mr. Huang was born in Beijing. After the Communists took over mainland China in 1950, he fled with his family to Taiwan, where he graduated from high school. He earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1957 from National Taiwan University. In 1960, he came to the U.S. to study for a master's degree in civil engineering, which he earned in 1962 from the University of Minnesota.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 3, 2000
BEIJING -- In the past, Chinese often greeted each other on the street by saying, "Ni chi le ma?" or "Have you eaten?" a polite phrase based on cuisine's central role in traditional culture here. But the country's language is rapidly evolving along with the wider culture. So, in recent years, some people have added an ironic spin by saying, "Ni lihun le ma?" or "Have you divorced?" [em dash] a reference to the rising divorce rate in a nation where the practice was once largely unknown.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
As the nation observes Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month in May, students and staff at a scholastic program in Columbia can boast that they highlight Chinese heritage year round. Each Sunday, they gather at Howard Community College in Columbia for Howard County Chinese School, a program that offers lessons on Chinese language and culture for students in kindergarten through the 10th grade, as well as for adults. Launched in 1998 with about 80 students, the school has grown to about 1,000 school-age enrollees and 400 adults, and has a faculty that includes instructors who taught at schools in China.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2004
Mary Ellen Reno, a well-known Walters Art Museum docent and world traveler who relished sharing her enthusiasm and appreciation for Asian art with gallery visitors, died of lung cancer Saturday at her Towson home. She was 69. She was born Mary Ellen Klock in Rochester, N.Y., and raised in Verona, N.J., and Chambersburg, Pa., where she graduated from high school in 1952. After earning a degree in French from Bryn Mawr College in 1956, she taught school for a year in Devon, Pa. In 1957, she married Russell R. Reno Jr., a lawyer and partner in the Baltimore law firm of Venable LLP. While raising her four children, Mrs. Reno worked during the 1980s as a part-time tour guide for the now-defunct Baltimore Rent-A-Tour, which provided tours of the area for visiting conventions and guests attending meetings.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | December 25, 2006
Colin Lyman stood in front of his classmates with a color photograph of his family and spoke cautiously as he pointed to each face. "Baba, mama, didi, yeye, nainai, gege," said the 16-year- old junior at Columbia's Wilde Lake High School, identifying his father, mother, younger brother, grandfather, grandmother and older brother. His teacher, Wei-chuan Liu, nodded and then broke his momentum with a question in Mandarin Chinese. "I don't know what you are saying," Colin said, laughing.
NEWS
June 22, 2008
Underage drinking, alcohol abuse to be discussed The Columbia Association Teen Center, Howard County Library and Howard County Health Department will co-sponsor a discussion on preventing underage drinking and alcohol abuse from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the east Columbia library, 6600 Cradlerock Way. The free program is made possible through Leadership to Keep Children Alcohol Free, a national initiative to prevent alcohol use by children ages...
NEWS
January 16, 2006
Americans, generally known worldwide for their inability to speak anything other than English, are finally starting to take more seriously learning other tongues. Competing effectively in a global economy ought to be sufficient reason for that. But the growing awareness of the U.S. language deficit is largely driven by the wars in Iraq and on terrorism. President Bush has announced a $114 million National Security Language Initiative to expand Americans' study of less commonly taught languages, such as Arabic, Chinese, Farsi and Hindi.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | December 11, 2013
As Grace Lee Chou rang a brass school bell by hand in the hallways of Loch Raven High School on a recent Sunday afternoon, television sets in many area homes were tuned into the Ravens game and families were busy with typical weekend activities. But six first- and second-graders were soon hard at work in a classroom, repeating letters and consonant blends in unison as their teacher, Julie Liu, pointed to them one by one on a chalkboard. The children were competing to see who could recite the letters the loudest and who could get the most correct, a scene common in schools the world over.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
The premise behind a Chinese yo-yo seems simple enough, especially to kids eager to be the first among their peers to master a new and unusual skill. In the hands of teacher Jimmy Chiu at the summer culture camp sponsored by the Chinese Language School of Columbia, the hourglass-shaped plastic toy balances and spins on the string he controls with two wooden sticks.
NEWS
By Robert Herschbach | February 27, 2011
Each Sunday, in her Chinese-language kindergarten class in Columbia, my daughter and I follow the adventures of Baby Pig and Well-Behaved Bunny, the lead characters in the textbook. After several years of trying to learn my wife's native language, I can almost keep up. The teacher, Mrs. Jin, has a dancer's physique, an enviable fashion sense and a manner both friendly and firm. I've never heard her raise her voice; there's no horsing around or talking back. These kids are guai guai — a term you'll invariably hear among Chinese when the younger folk are in earshot.
NEWS
June 29, 2008
Graduates named outstanding volunteers Two recent Howard County high school graduates have been selected as Outstanding Student Volunteers for Special Olympics Howard County. Each will receive a one-time scholarship of $1,500. Stephen Schnorf, a graduate of Wilde Lake High School, is the recipient of the 2008 Jackie Burk Memorial Award. He volunteered in track and field, bowling, cross country and aquatics, as well as at state games. The Burk family is funding the scholarship through memorial donations honoring their daughter Jackie, who was also a student volunteer for Special Olympics.
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