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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- NATO's mistaken bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Yugoslavia has turned Beijing into an advocate for Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and handed the United States a new headache in its quest to end the Balkans war.China usually treads quietly in world crises, except when its interests are directly at stake. It holds a powerful veto in the United Nations Security Council but seldom exercises it.Until Friday, Beijing had avoided mounting a strong challenge to NATO's air war against Yugoslavia and had been counted out as a major diplomatic problem for the White House.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
A contemporary Chinese artist helped a private school in Baltimore County dedicate its Confucius Classroom on Monday. Wu Ching-ju, speaking through an interpreter, opened the ceremony at Garrison Forest School, an all-girls elementary through high school in Owings Mills. With a slide show of her graceful sculptures playing in the background, the artist related the story of her life steeped in "curiosity for the world" and a determination to succeed. She listened to a student concert, toured the classroom filled with Chinese artwork and offered her insights to a sculpting class.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- An outdated map of Belgrade was the first of a "series of errors" that led an American B-2 bomber to strike the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade rather than a nearby Yugoslav weapons facility, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen said yesterday. "This tragedy happened because a number of systems designed to produce and to verify accurate data failed," Cohen told reporters. Cohen said that while the investigation is continuing, the bombing instructions were based on a 1992 map that was updated in 1997 and 1998 but never showed the embassy, which was constructed in 1996.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | October 17, 2009
State economic development officials joined with leaders from the University of Maryland and China to open a new incubator and research park Friday near the College Park campus. The University of Maryland-China Research Park, the first Chinese-sponsored research park in the United States, aims to forge stronger ties between the campus, state business development leaders and companies in China that seek expansion in the U.S. C.D. Mote Jr., president of the University of Maryland, said Chinese officials had considered locating the park in other technology hubs in the United States, such as Southern California, North Carolina and Boston.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Two of the three Chinese journalists killed in the accidental NATO bombing of China's Embassy in Belgrade last month were intelligence officers, U.S. officials said yesterday.The May 7 attack apparently destroyed the embassy's intelligence compound, according to a senior administration official.He said this could explain why, despite detailed private assurances by President Clinton and U.S. diplomats, China continues to insist that the bombing could not have been accidental.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 9, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- With a basement location opposite the Chinese Embassy, Jasmina Ostojic used to think her small grocery store was in the safest place in town.But not anymore.Yesterday, Ostojic cleaned up the mess left by NATO's shocking early morning attack against the Chinese Embassy. Sweeping away glass and straightening her supplies, Ostojic was open for business and open to nearly any idea as to why the deadly strike took place."I can't believe they did it," she said. "It must be World War III."
NEWS
May 11, 1999
NATO must stay the course -- even when things go wrong -- bombing Serbia until it agrees to reverse the ethnic cleansing of Kosovo and return its people to live in peace secure from terror.The bomb that destroyed the Chinese embassy in Belgrade on Friday, killing three Chinese, was a smart bomb that worked. Human intelligence programmed it to hit the wrong building, 200 yards from the right one.The intended target was Yugoslav military procurement headquarters. The building hit had been China's embassy for the past two years.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 13, 1999
BEIJING -- U.S. Ambassador James R. Sasser finally walked out of his embassy yesterday morning after a four-day standoff with rock-throwing protesters, saying it would take at least a week to get the diplomatic post up and running again.Sasser said an adjacent building housing the embassy's commercial office was destroyed. Across the street in the compound that contains the consulate were several cars crumpled from days of pummeling by demonstrators."The cars are unbelievable," Sasser said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 18, 1999
BEIJING -- China has publicly rejected the latest U.S. attempt to portray last month's bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, as a mistake.Undersecretary of State Thomas R. Pickering spent more than five hours on Wednesday with high-ranking Chinese officials in an attempt to heal the rift in relations caused by the bombing but his detailed explanation was described as "not convincing.""The explanations the U.S. side has supplied so far for the cause of the incident are not convincing, and the conclusion that it was a so-called mistaken bombing is by no means acceptable to the Chinese government and people," the official Xinhua News Agency reported yesterday.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | May 12, 1999
NATO bombs killed three people and injured 20 more at the Chinese embassy in Belgrade last week, but the casualties from this appalling blunder continue to mount. The Chinese government has already announced suspension of high-level talks with Washington over human rights, arms control and nuclear proliferation issues.But the repercussions could hit hard within the Chinese government itself, too, as those in Beijing who have urged closer ties to the Clinton administration get their comeuppance.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Tom Bowman and Jay Hancock and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush for the first time described the impasse with China over the detention of an American aircrew as a "stalemate" yesterday as Beijing again demanded a formal U.S. apology and acceptance of responsibility for the collision of a Chinese fighter jet and a U.S. spy plane. "This administration is doing everything we can to end the stalemate in an efficient way," Bush said after meeting with Jordan's King Abdullah II. "Diplomacy sometimes takes a little longer than people would like.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 31, 2001
BEIJING - For the second time this year, Chinese authorities have detained a visiting scholar, this time a U.S. citizen who teaches business at City University of Hong Kong. China's State Security Bureau detained Professor Li Shaomin on Feb. 25 as he tried to enter the mainland from Hong Kong, according to his wife, Liu Yingli. Liu said her husband was traveling from the former British colony to the Chinese border city of Shenzhen to meet with a friend, but she declined to elaborate. She said she had not heard from her husband since then and did not know why Chinese authorities would have detained him. "The Chinese government can detain you for any reason," said Liu, who teaches marketing at City University of Hong Kong.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Heather Dewar and Frank Langfitt and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1999
BEIJING -- One state's honorary citizen is another country's "evil mastermind."So it appeared last month after a polite gesture by the Baltimore mayor's office and the governor's office ignited rage in -- of all places -- the People's Republic of China.This year, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke named an official day for Chinese citizen Li Hongzhi, the leader of the spiritual meditation group Falun Gong. The governor's office gave Li an honorary state citizenship certificate. Ordinarily, such gestures of goodwill go unnoticed by the executives who proclaim them and most of the rest of the world.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 1, 1999
BEIJING -- A middle-age Chinese mother showed up recently at the apartment of an American friend bearing gifts and fighting tears. Her 15-year-old daughter had been selected for a two-week school trip to the United States -- an extraordinary opportunity for a Chinese teen-ager.The U.S. Consulate, however, had rejected her visa application out of fear she wouldn't return. The woman presented her American acquaintances with a small vase and a bowl. Then she placed $250 -- a large sum by Chinese standards -- on the coffee table.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 31, 1999
BEIJING -- In a sign that Sino-U.S. relations are moving beyond the deep freeze that set in after NATO bombed the Chinese Embassy in Yugoslavia, both sides agreed yesterday that the U.S. will pay $4.5 million to the injured and the families of those who died in the May attack.U.S. officials emphasized that the payments -- which the Chinese government will distribute -- are "humanitarian" in nature in hopes that they will not provide a legal precedent for future claims resulting from damage during war."
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Two of the three Chinese journalists killed in the accidental NATO bombing of China's Embassy in Belgrade last month were intelligence officers, U.S. officials said yesterday.The May 7 attack apparently destroyed the embassy's intelligence compound, according to a senior administration official.He said this could explain why, despite detailed private assurances by President Clinton and U.S. diplomats, China continues to insist that the bombing could not have been accidental.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Faulty planning, not pilot error or malfunctioning bombs, appears to have led NATO aircraft to mistakenly strike the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade with precision munitions, alliance and Pentagon officials said yesterday.NATO and U.S. officials apologized profoundly to China for the attack in which four people died and 21 were wounded.Although they are still trying to figure out what happened, officials indicated that inaccurate intelligence led the bombers to strike the embassy with the distinctive pagoda-style roof rather than its intended target: a Yugoslav procurement and supply building.
NEWS
By Milt Bearden | May 19, 1999
THE accidental bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade shattered the cozy notion that the war in the Balkans is some kind of video game of exploding cross hairs. The sight of a grieving Chinese father bidding farewell to his daughter, one of three killed in the embassy, somberly reminded us of that.Within hours of the bombing, the public was besieged with expert opinions on the deadly error. The usual CIA-bashers found new energy for their theme that the intelligence agency is a bloated collection of incompetents and misfits so out of touch with the real world that they cannot even pull the correct address of the Chinese Embassy off the Internet.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 18, 1999
BEIJING -- China has publicly rejected the latest U.S. attempt to portray last month's bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, as a mistake.Undersecretary of State Thomas R. Pickering spent more than five hours on Wednesday with high-ranking Chinese officials in an attempt to heal the rift in relations caused by the bombing but his detailed explanation was described as "not convincing.""The explanations the U.S. side has supplied so far for the cause of the incident are not convincing, and the conclusion that it was a so-called mistaken bombing is by no means acceptable to the Chinese government and people," the official Xinhua News Agency reported yesterday.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 21, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- For nearly two weeks, the war was heard off in the distance, faint echoes of bombs landing on suburban military targets or clinical reports of damage sustained inside Kosovo.With the respite, spring seemed to return to Belgrade, where people thronged the streets during the day, and cafes and discos began opening at night.But early yesterday morning, NATO's air war returned with a vengeance.The sky glowed with anti-aircraft fire and bombs began falling, including one that struck the grounds of Dragisa Misovic hospital, killing three patients and a security guard.
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