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By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 1997
TO REALLY LEARN about a country and its people, I believe you must study the culture.Thanks to a PTA-sponsored program, Freedom Elementary School third-graders were recently treated to a glimpse of Chinese culture through the ancient art of storytelling.Storyteller Linda Fang used traditional costumes and props as she took students into China's distant past through three Chinese folk tales.Fang's first story was of a man who convinced his neighbors that he possessed a lucky nose. Although the man wasn't totally honest, his actions eventually brought him an important job as a detective.
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By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Date: Sept. 28 Her story: Katelyn Niu, 29, was born in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Province, China, and moved to Maryland in 2000. She graduated with doctor of dental surgery and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Maryland, Baltimore in May and is an associate dentist in Hagerstown. Her mother, Ming Bell, and stepfather, Stephen Bell, live in Ellicott City. His story: Kevin Yang, 29, was born in Fuzhou, Fujian Province, China. He moved to Woodbury, N.J., with his family in 1996 before relocating to Cumberland a year later.
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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- In his long career, Bo Yang has produced hundreds of novels, essays and columns. One of his works -- a translation of the U.S. comic strip "Popeye" -- so offended this island's former dictator, Chiang Kai-shek, that Mr. Bo was jailed for nine years.There was a resemblance between the generalissimo and the cartoon character.But nothing that the 73-year-old satirist and social critic has written has stirred so much controversy as a short essay based on a speech he gave at the University of Iowa in 1984.
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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
The premise behind a Chinese yo-yo seems simple enough, especially to kids eager to be the first among their peers to master a new and unusual skill. In the hands of teacher Jimmy Chiu at the summer culture camp sponsored by the Chinese Language School of Columbia, the hourglass-shaped plastic toy balances and spins on the string he controls with two wooden sticks.
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By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Date: Sept. 28 Her story: Katelyn Niu, 29, was born in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Province, China, and moved to Maryland in 2000. She graduated with doctor of dental surgery and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Maryland, Baltimore in May and is an associate dentist in Hagerstown. Her mother, Ming Bell, and stepfather, Stephen Bell, live in Ellicott City. His story: Kevin Yang, 29, was born in Fuzhou, Fujian Province, China. He moved to Woodbury, N.J., with his family in 1996 before relocating to Cumberland a year later.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 1, 1995
BEIJING -- In many ways, Liu Dongkai is terribly proud of his son. The young man graduated high school this year, has been accepted to study science at an elite university and stands a good chance of landing a four-year scholarship.One thing, though, troubles Mr. Liu, a professor of Chinese philosophy at Beijing University."He thinks that what I do is a waste of time. He doesn't know anything about Chinese philosophy or culture and has no interest in it at all," says Mr. Liu. "He thinks it's irrelevant to the present -- especially to making money."
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1997
THERE WERE OODLES of "American Girls" at Carrolltowne Elementary School on Friday. Sherlock Holmes, Pippi Longstocking, Pocahontas and Indiana Jones dropped in, too.The Cat in the Hat, with his distinctive striped hat, could be found in several classrooms. For the third consecutive year, students at Carrolltowne held a "Book Buddy Day.""We decided it would be a wonderful way of celebrating Maryland Reading Month," said Susan Abramson, the school's language arts specialist. "It's all about good literature.
NEWS
By Thi Lam | April 2, 1996
AS THE WORLD economic balance shifts to the fast-growing Asia-Pacific rim, Western nations are increasingly alarmed at the prospect of a culture clash between the two regions. They fear not just a rejection of Western political values but the loss of economic opportunities in the booming Pacific market.The recent economic summit of 25 Europe and Asian leaders in Bangkok fueled those fears. Asian hosts openly questioned Western beliefs that democracy, human rights and environmental protection are necessary for sustained economic growth.
NEWS
July 6, 2008
Program teaches kids about China Introducing a group of about 40 fourth- through sixth-graders to Chinese culture, language and customs, the Maryland Summer Center for Chinese Studies will conduct its two-week summer program at Meade Middle School from tomorrow through July 18. A grand lion dance demonstration will kick off the first day, and the program will culminate with students displaying their newly acquired Chinese skills. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. every day of the program, students will be immersed in the Chinese culture through such activities as learning to count to 31 in Chinese with an abacus, understanding the Chinese calendar, practicing Chinese painting and calligraphy, playing Chinese games, learning a tai chi routine, singing Chinese children's songs, and using chopsticks to sample Chinese food.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 1998
CHINESE CULTURE and its celebration of the Year of the Tiger were the focus of a family event Saturday at Liberty High School.The school's Multicultural Club helped entertain children and their families during the activity, which was sponsored by the Baltimore Chapter of Families with Children from China.A dozen Liberty students and faculty adviser Brenda Alexander helped preschoolers from more than 75 families as they enjoyed crafts, games and a magic show. Many children wore traditional Chinese clothing.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
A contemporary Chinese artist helped a private school in Baltimore County dedicate its Confucius Classroom on Monday. Wu Ching-ju, speaking through an interpreter, opened the ceremony at Garrison Forest School, an all-girls elementary through high school in Owings Mills. With a slide show of her graceful sculptures playing in the background, the artist related the story of her life steeped in "curiosity for the world" and a determination to succeed. She listened to a student concert, toured the classroom filled with Chinese artwork and offered her insights to a sculpting class.
NEWS
July 6, 2008
Program teaches kids about China Introducing a group of about 40 fourth- through sixth-graders to Chinese culture, language and customs, the Maryland Summer Center for Chinese Studies will conduct its two-week summer program at Meade Middle School from tomorrow through July 18. A grand lion dance demonstration will kick off the first day, and the program will culminate with students displaying their newly acquired Chinese skills. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. every day of the program, students will be immersed in the Chinese culture through such activities as learning to count to 31 in Chinese with an abacus, understanding the Chinese calendar, practicing Chinese painting and calligraphy, playing Chinese games, learning a tai chi routine, singing Chinese children's songs, and using chopsticks to sample Chinese food.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2006
Details on family life murky in murder case On the day after Christmas, 20-year-old Jason Chen said, he discovered his father assaulting his mother during a morning argument in their three-story Ellicott City townhouse. Chen told police that he stepped in to protect his mother, took a knife from his father and stabbed him multiple times. The murder case against him will largely hinge on whether prosecutors and police believe his story. "Because he confessed, all of the work that normally would be done prior to an arrest is being done after it," said Sherry Llewellyn, a spokeswoman for Howard County police.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2002
On a Sunday afternoon, the gym at Howard High School is packed with kids playing basketball. At a table in the school's entrance, a group of parents works on fund raising. Voices drift from the classrooms into the hallway. Everywhere - the gym, among the parents, in every class - people are speaking Chinese. The Chinese Language School of Columbia (CLSC) was founded nearly 30 years ago. Several Columbia families began meeting at one another's homes Sunday afternoons, hoping to teach their children about Chinese heritage.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2002
LAST WEEK, a room at the east Columbia library was filled with little girls in traditional Chinese clothing, dancing traditional Chinese dances and singing traditional Chinese songs. The children, ages 4 to 6, are participants in a Chinese dance class taught by Owen Brown resident Xiao Fang Xu. Many of the children in Xu's weekly dance class have been adopted from China. The class is one way their American parents help them connect with their Chinese heritage. "They would get the dancing and songs in school if they were still in China," said Long Reach parent Bob McMahon,whose daughter, Elizabeth, 6, was adopted from China four years ago. "This class gives her a chance to interact with other Chinese children her age."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 10, 2001
NBC and producer Robert Halmi Sr. continue their assault on world literature, fairy tale and myth tomorrow with "The Lost Empire," a bloated four-hour miniseries starring Thomas Gibson ("Dharma and Greg") and Bai Ling ("Anna and the King"). Remember last year's big-budget bomb brought to us by Halmi and NBC, "The 10th Kingdom," which took a number of the most culturally significant European fairy tales and turned them into miniseries muck? Remember how the heroes were white and the worst of the invented-for-TV villains were characterized by their various colorings of black and brown skin?
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2006
Details on family life murky in murder case On the day after Christmas, 20-year-old Jason Chen said, he discovered his father assaulting his mother during a morning argument in their three-story Ellicott City townhouse. Chen told police that he stepped in to protect his mother, took a knife from his father and stabbed him multiple times. The murder case against him will largely hinge on whether prosecutors and police believe his story. "Because he confessed, all of the work that normally would be done prior to an arrest is being done after it," said Sherry Llewellyn, a spokeswoman for Howard County police.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
A contemporary Chinese artist helped a private school in Baltimore County dedicate its Confucius Classroom on Monday. Wu Ching-ju, speaking through an interpreter, opened the ceremony at Garrison Forest School, an all-girls elementary through high school in Owings Mills. With a slide show of her graceful sculptures playing in the background, the artist related the story of her life steeped in "curiosity for the world" and a determination to succeed. She listened to a student concert, toured the classroom filled with Chinese artwork and offered her insights to a sculpting class.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 31, 2001
BEIJING -- Every morning after breakfast - even when the temperature dips into the 20s - they gather along the red-columned portico at Beijing's Temple of Heaven Park. Gao Zhenyu, a 74-year-old retired worker from a state-run leather factory, sits on a cold wooden railing and gently strokes notes from his erhu, a two-string Chinese fiddle. Next to him sits Chen Renmei, a sometime salesman, plucking away on his yueqin - a sort of Chinese mandolin. Over the next two hours, Gao, Chen and other musicians will play for a crowd of 50 to 60 retirees and laid-off workers who stand outdoors here or in the other parks throughout Beijing to listen to a unique performing art: Peking Opera.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1999
For playwright David Henry Hwang ("Golden Child"), being Chinese-American has meant contending with "this idea of being perpetual foreigners."For architect I.M. Pei, it's meant that, even after 60 years in this country, "I'm still Chinese."And for Connie Chung, it meant beating her classmates to the punch when it came to joking about her distinctive appearance."The kids would say, `Can you see the ceiling and the floor, because your eyes are [so narrow]?' I used to make jokes about it. If I joked about it before anyone else did, then they wouldn't make a joke about me."
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