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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 1997
NEW YORK -- With a clear head and voice, Wei Jingsheng, who spent almost all of the past 19 years in Chinese prisons, said yesterday that his recent release was "only a small victory" in a much larger battle for democracy in the world's most populous nation."
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NEWS
Peter Morici | July 1, 2014
Economists should be bound by facts and reason. I simply can't embrace liberal positions on the minimum wage, climate change and gender discrimination, and call myself a scientist. Let's take them one by one: The minimum wage: The Congressional Budget Office estimates that raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, as President Obama proposes, would eliminate 500,000 to 1,000,000 jobs. Businesses will be forced to raise prices, thereby reducing purchases (If beef or a plumber's visit gets too high, folks eat more chicken and fix their own faucets)
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NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | July 2, 1991
BEIJING -- The Chinese Communist Party, riddled with corruption and increasingly isolated in a world moving away from socialism, celebrated its 70th birthday yesterday with a good deal of fanfare aimed at buttressing its sagging legitimacy."
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | November 12, 2009
One of the few incontrovertible assertions one can reasonably make is that no one supports forced abortion. Yet, coerced abortions, as well as involuntary sterilizations, are commonplace in China, Beijing's protestations notwithstanding. While the Chinese Communist Party insists that abortions are voluntary under the nation's one-child policy, electronic documentation recently smuggled out of the country tells a different story. Congressional members of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission heard some of that story Tuesday, two days before President Barack Obama was slated to leave for Asia, including China, to discuss economic issues.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
IN IMPERIAL China, one of the first acts of new dynasties was to rewrite the history of the last dynasty. The minimal notice so far by China's state media of the death of former reformist leader Zhao Ziyang speaks volumes about the feudal strains in modern Chinese authoritarianism - and gives life to the nightmares haunting an insecure single-party state trying to control rising aspirations and a vast potential for unrest. Within China, official mourning for the ousted former premier and party secretary, under house arrest since right before the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, might unleash welled up cries for the long-denied reappraisal of that watershed slaughter of unarmed demonstrators - and highlight the lasting damage wrought by those murders on the Chinese Communist Party's claims to legitimacy.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | November 30, 1991
BEIJING -- Having stifled potential urban unrest for now, Chinese Communist Party leaders are turning their attention to shoring up their traditional base of support among the more than 800 million peasants in China's vast countryside.Ending a five-day plenum in Beijing yesterday, the party's Central Committee called for stepped-up party-building and socialist education efforts in rural areas, as well as increased investment in rural economic development and critical water control systems.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 12, 1992
BEIJING -- The Chinese Communist Party's national congress, which opens here today, will put out to pasture many of China's old-guard, conservative revolutionaries by abolishing a key advisory body for retired leaders.During its six-day meeting, the congress will change the party's charter in order to eliminate its Central Advisory Commission, a congress spokesman, Liu Chongde, announced yesterday.The commission -- composed of about 200 members, many well into their 80s -- was created 10 years ago by Chinese patriarch Deng Xiaoping as a way to gracefully move many other elderly party leaders out of the political limelight.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | September 23, 1992
BEIJING -- The Chinese Communist Party appears ready to formally enshrine patriarch Deng Xiaoping's full-speed-ahead approach to economic reform as China's direction for the next five years.Capping months of speculation, the state-run Xinhua news service yesterday announced that the 14th national party congress will open Oct. 12 and will "take as its guide" Mr. Deng's dramatic drive this year for stepping up China's market-style economic reforms.Xinhua said that the key meeting, held every five years, will mobilize the Chinese people "to further emancipate their minds and seize the opportune moment to accelerate the pace of reform, opening to the outside world and modernization."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 1997
BEIJING -- One of the biggest guessing games here ended yesterday when the Chinese Communist Party announced that it would open its most important meeting in years Sept. 12.In most countries, such information would have been a matter of public record months, if not years, ahead of the event. But until yesterday, the timing of China's 15th Party Congress was something of a state secret.The congress -- which is part convention, part national election -- is the first since the death of paramount leader Deng Xiaoping.
NEWS
December 26, 2003
TODAY, CHINESE officialdom will unleash a notable degree of fanfare to commemorate the 110th anniversary of the birth of Mao Tse-tung, the founder of modern China and for a quarter-century its omnipotent Helmsman. In honor of Mao -- whose corpse still is on view in a mausoleum in the symbolic heart of China, Tiananmen Square -- a new symphony has been composed from that old Communist standby, "The East Is Red." And there's a flurry of Mao books, art, stamps, TV shows and even rap recordings.
NEWS
By Alison J. Dray-Novey | June 4, 2009
Demonstrations at Tiananmen 20 years ago grew out of a paradox that had been building in China since 1978, all through the era of rapid economic reform. To achieve its aims, the Chinese Communist Party wished to liberate people economically while continuing to constrain them politically. A version of this same tension persists today. Following the disastrous Cultural Revolution (1965-1970s), the party no longer could base its legitimacy on Maoist socialism. Marxist-Leninist ideology was virtually dead.
NEWS
January 19, 2005
IN IMPERIAL China, one of the first acts of new dynasties was to rewrite the history of the last dynasty. The minimal notice so far by China's state media of the death of former reformist leader Zhao Ziyang speaks volumes about the feudal strains in modern Chinese authoritarianism - and gives life to the nightmares haunting an insecure single-party state trying to control rising aspirations and a vast potential for unrest. Within China, official mourning for the ousted former premier and party secretary, under house arrest since right before the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, might unleash welled up cries for the long-denied reappraisal of that watershed slaughter of unarmed demonstrators - and highlight the lasting damage wrought by those murders on the Chinese Communist Party's claims to legitimacy.
NEWS
September 21, 2004
FEW CENTERS of political machination are more closely watched and still less known with certainty than Zhongnanhai, the central Beijing Kremlin where the top leaders of the Chinese Communist Party have tended to live and work. Yes, by fits and starts, China and its ruling party are moving - at times painfully - toward a bit more open governance. But even the best outside analysis often remains riddled with speculation. Take Sunday's major news at the end of CCP's annual secret party plenum: Immediate past party chairman and national president, Jiang Zemin, stepped down from his last important position as head of the party's powerful Central Military Commission - marking the final formal step by his successor, Hu Jintao, in taking over as head of China's party, state and military.
NEWS
December 26, 2003
TODAY, CHINESE officialdom will unleash a notable degree of fanfare to commemorate the 110th anniversary of the birth of Mao Tse-tung, the founder of modern China and for a quarter-century its omnipotent Helmsman. In honor of Mao -- whose corpse still is on view in a mausoleum in the symbolic heart of China, Tiananmen Square -- a new symphony has been composed from that old Communist standby, "The East Is Red." And there's a flurry of Mao books, art, stamps, TV shows and even rap recordings.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 19, 1999
BEIJING -- Near a stretch of beach on Macau's island of Coloane sits Fernando's, a small, Portuguese restaurant with red-checked tablecloths, pitchers of sangria and some of the tastiest garlic prawns in South China. At midnight tonight, Macau -- the last Western colony in Asia -- will return to Chinese rule after more than four centuries under Portuguese control. And while restaurant owner Fernando Gomez will miss his country's red and green flag flying over the governor's mansion, he is looking forward to other changes.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 1997
NEW YORK -- With a clear head and voice, Wei Jingsheng, who spent almost all of the past 19 years in Chinese prisons, said yesterday that his recent release was "only a small victory" in a much larger battle for democracy in the world's most populous nation."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | January 26, 1992
BEIJING -- China's top leader, Deng Xiaoping, out of the public eye for a year, turned up last week in Shenzhen, the RTC Chinese capital of capitalism. The visit is believed to underscore a growing commitment here to accelerating market-style economic reforms.Chinese leaders commonly journey south for the lunar New Year holiday, which falls this year on Feb. 4. Last year, Mr. Deng, on whose failing health most political questions here hinge, showed up at the birthplace of the Chinese Communist Party, Shanghai, looking frail and a bit glassy-eyed.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 1997
BEIJING -- One of the biggest guessing games here ended yesterday when the Chinese Communist Party announced that it would open its most important meeting in years Sept. 12.In most countries, such information would have been a matter of public record months, if not years, ahead of the event. But until yesterday, the timing of China's 15th Party Congress was something of a state secret.The congress -- which is part convention, part national election -- is the first since the death of paramount leader Deng Xiaoping.
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