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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | November 26, 1992
New York As banners outside the Metropolitan Museum of Art proclaim big, new retrospectives of some of Western art's lesser giants, a groundbreaking exhibition in a back wing is giving the first comprehensive view of one of history's towering geniuses: the 17th-century Chinese landscape artist, calligrapher and theoretician, Tung Ch'i-Ch'ang.Dubbed "China's Picasso," Tung succeeded in moving the emphasis of Chinese art away from representing objective reality and toward abstraction. Nearly 300 years before the Western abstract expressionists, Tung radically reinterpreted traditional painting by subordinating everything in the composition -- including perspective and proportion -- to the needs of the composition and brushwork.
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By Katie V. Jones, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 30, 2014
As the song "Timber" rocked through the speakers, the crowd gathered for River Hill High School's Cultural Awareness Night couldn't stay seated - soon everyone joined in for a Zumba demonstration. "I did Zumba," laughed Amy Hairston, the schools choral director, catching her breath. As faculty sponsor of the River Hill's Cultural Awareness Club, which organized the March 25 festivities, Hairston was enjoying herself after all the work the group put into organizing the night. "This is the third year I spearheaded this," Hairston said.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 18, 1991
Au Ho-Nien's "Tiger Head" appears to materialize out of the paper. The head with open mouth and glowing eyes stands out from neck, chest and front legs that ever so gradually become more vague. Behind, there is the merest suggestion of a body, the wisp of a stroke and a slight shadow which we half expect to clarify itself into a form as we watch.In the same artist's "By the Stream," we see trees, mists and clouds first, then the small figure, right at the end of a grouping of rocks, with his feet disappearing into the water.
NEWS
November 28, 2005
TODAY TOWSON TREE LIGHTING -- The annual Christmas tree-lighting ceremony in Towson will be at 6 p.m. at Towson Commons, Pennsylvania Avenue and York Road. Metered parking and parking in county Revenue Authority garages will be free after 5 p.m. 410-825-1144. ANNAPOLIS COUNCIL TO MEET -- The Annapolis city council will meet at 7 p.m. to discuss the proposed lease of Market House along with an annexation moratorium and zoning restrictions along West Street. The meeting will be at City Hall, 160 Duke of Gloucester St. 410-263-1184.
NEWS
January 2, 2005
Anne Dean Truitt, 83, a sculptor who reflected on her life as an artist, wife and mother in three gracefully written published journals, died Dec. 23 at a hospital in Washington, D.C., of complications after abdominal surgery. She was among the first artists to have the term "minimalist" applied to three-dimensional work. But because her austere squared wooden columns were carefully built and hand-painted, rather than industrially manufactured in the Minimalist manner, many commentators described her work as non-Minimalist and more three-dimensional painting than sculpture.
NEWS
November 28, 2005
TODAY TOWSON TREE LIGHTING -- The annual Christmas tree-lighting ceremony in Towson will be at 6 p.m. at Towson Commons, Pennsylvania Avenue and York Road. Metered parking and parking in county Revenue Authority garages will be free after 5 p.m. 410-825-1144. ANNAPOLIS COUNCIL TO MEET -- The Annapolis city council will meet at 7 p.m. to discuss the proposed lease of Market House along with an annexation moratorium and zoning restrictions along West Street. The meeting will be at City Hall, 160 Duke of Gloucester St. 410-263-1184.
NEWS
June 9, 1996
Walters scores coup acquiring Chinese artThe Walters Art Gallery has scored another coup and since there has been so little fanfare, a letter is in order.Hailed at the recent opening as one of the most important purchases of the decade, Hiram Woodward, curator of Asian art, in consultation with, among others, Gary Vikan, Walters director, recently acquired for the museum and placed on display a truly great masterpiece of Chinese landscape painting. The purchase was made possible through the W. Alton Jones Foundation Acquisition Fund.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford | December 18, 1991
The children at Odenton Elementary School enjoyed a special treat last Thursday. Wang Chuan Wen, a middle school teacher from Tianjin, China, held an assembly for the entire school.Wang showed the children and staff the art of Chinese brush-painting. He also talked aboutlife in his home town and answered questions from students.Now, if you are wondering how a middle school teacher from China ends up at Odenton Elementary . . . well, the story goes like this:In 1988, three American art teachers were attending a conference inChina and met Wang while he was painting portraits near the Great Wall.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
In the largest study of acupuncture to date, researchers have found the 2,000-year-old Chinese treatment can supplement traditional therapies to help relieve pain and improve function in patients with arthritis of the knee. Patients who had 23 sessions of acupuncture over six months reported significantly better knee function by the eighth week of treatment and a marked decrease in pain by the 14th week. The results of the trial, published today in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, validate, at least to some extent, what many Americans already believe: Acupuncture works.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1996
The Walters Art Gallery has had a great collection of Chinese porcelain going back to when William Walters omnivorously bought in this field 100 years ago. What it hasn't had is a great Chinese handscroll to complement all that porcelain. Now it does.A recently acquired Ch'ing dynasty handscroll by Wang Yuan-ch'i, "Free Spirits Among Streams and Mountains," has been -unrolled as the centerpiece for a focus exhibit. Besides this celebrated 1684 handscroll, the exhibit features works by others, including the artist's great-grandson, Wang Ch'en.
NEWS
January 2, 2005
Anne Dean Truitt, 83, a sculptor who reflected on her life as an artist, wife and mother in three gracefully written published journals, died Dec. 23 at a hospital in Washington, D.C., of complications after abdominal surgery. She was among the first artists to have the term "minimalist" applied to three-dimensional work. But because her austere squared wooden columns were carefully built and hand-painted, rather than industrially manufactured in the Minimalist manner, many commentators described her work as non-Minimalist and more three-dimensional painting than sculpture.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
In the largest study of acupuncture to date, researchers have found the 2,000-year-old Chinese treatment can supplement traditional therapies to help relieve pain and improve function in patients with arthritis of the knee. Patients who had 23 sessions of acupuncture over six months reported significantly better knee function by the eighth week of treatment and a marked decrease in pain by the 14th week. The results of the trial, published today in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, validate, at least to some extent, what many Americans already believe: Acupuncture works.
FEATURES
By CHERYL LU-LIEN TAN and CHERYL LU-LIEN TAN,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- By the light of a lone desk lamp in the dank kitchen of a Northeast Washington house, Gong Nai Chang hunches over a large sheet of rice paper and dips the carefully sharpened nail of his index finger into a bowl of thick, pungent ink.He pauses for a moment, then begins to paint.Slowly, deftly, he creates an eye, then another, then a nose and a mouth. And when the fierce, ugly face of the legendary demon-slayer Zhong Kui is formed, he dabs more digits into the bowl and produces a beard, hair and then a body outline and sword -- all with swift strokes made by the tips of his fingers.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 2, 1997
From its very beginning, "Splendors of Imperial China" announces its themes: monumentality, subtlety, impeccable craftsmanship and that old (but here justified) cliche, timelessness.The show, at Washington's National Gallery, begins with a gallery of early masterpieces that sweep us down the ages from the third millennium (3000-2000) B.C. to the beginning of the Sung dynasty (960 A.D.).There are bronze vessels, from earlier than 1000 B.C., whose massive forms are balanced by decorative animal motifs and geometric abstractions as precise and crisp as if they were made yesterday.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1996
The Walters Art Gallery has had a great collection of Chinese porcelain going back to when William Walters omnivorously bought in this field 100 years ago. What it hasn't had is a great Chinese handscroll to complement all that porcelain. Now it does.A recently acquired Ch'ing dynasty handscroll by Wang Yuan-ch'i, "Free Spirits Among Streams and Mountains," has been -unrolled as the centerpiece for a focus exhibit. Besides this celebrated 1684 handscroll, the exhibit features works by others, including the artist's great-grandson, Wang Ch'en.
NEWS
June 9, 1996
Walters scores coup acquiring Chinese artThe Walters Art Gallery has scored another coup and since there has been so little fanfare, a letter is in order.Hailed at the recent opening as one of the most important purchases of the decade, Hiram Woodward, curator of Asian art, in consultation with, among others, Gary Vikan, Walters director, recently acquired for the museum and placed on display a truly great masterpiece of Chinese landscape painting. The purchase was made possible through the W. Alton Jones Foundation Acquisition Fund.
FEATURES
By CHERYL LU-LIEN TAN and CHERYL LU-LIEN TAN,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- By the light of a lone desk lamp in the dank kitchen of a Northeast Washington house, Gong Nai Chang hunches over a large sheet of rice paper and dips the carefully sharpened nail of his index finger into a bowl of thick, pungent ink.He pauses for a moment, then begins to paint.Slowly, deftly, he creates an eye, then another, then a nose and a mouth. And when the fierce, ugly face of the legendary demon-slayer Zhong Kui is formed, he dabs more digits into the bowl and produces a beard, hair and then a body outline and sword -- all with swift strokes made by the tips of his fingers.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 2, 1997
From its very beginning, "Splendors of Imperial China" announces its themes: monumentality, subtlety, impeccable craftsmanship and that old (but here justified) cliche, timelessness.The show, at Washington's National Gallery, begins with a gallery of early masterpieces that sweep us down the ages from the third millennium (3000-2000) B.C. to the beginning of the Sung dynasty (960 A.D.).There are bronze vessels, from earlier than 1000 B.C., whose massive forms are balanced by decorative animal motifs and geometric abstractions as precise and crisp as if they were made yesterday.
FEATURES
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | November 26, 1992
New York As banners outside the Metropolitan Museum of Art proclaim big, new retrospectives of some of Western art's lesser giants, a groundbreaking exhibition in a back wing is giving the first comprehensive view of one of history's towering geniuses: the 17th-century Chinese landscape artist, calligrapher and theoretician, Tung Ch'i-Ch'ang.Dubbed "China's Picasso," Tung succeeded in moving the emphasis of Chinese art away from representing objective reality and toward abstraction. Nearly 300 years before the Western abstract expressionists, Tung radically reinterpreted traditional painting by subordinating everything in the composition -- including perspective and proportion -- to the needs of the composition and brushwork.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford | December 18, 1991
The children at Odenton Elementary School enjoyed a special treat last Thursday. Wang Chuan Wen, a middle school teacher from Tianjin, China, held an assembly for the entire school.Wang showed the children and staff the art of Chinese brush-painting. He also talked aboutlife in his home town and answered questions from students.Now, if you are wondering how a middle school teacher from China ends up at Odenton Elementary . . . well, the story goes like this:In 1988, three American art teachers were attending a conference inChina and met Wang while he was painting portraits near the Great Wall.
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