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NEWS
July 18, 2003
NORTH AND SOUTH Korean soldiers exchanged machine-gun fire across the so-called demilitarized zone yesterday. Such incidents have been frequent in the half-century of the Korean peninsula's suspended civil war, though not recently. And these days, they're not to be taken that seriously save as another demand for attention by Pyongyang. Last week's North Korean claim that it now has enough plutonium from reprocessed spent fuel rods to begin making nuclear weapons can be viewed in a similar, though far more serious, light.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A shipment of aluminum sheets from China had to be fumigated at the port of Baltimore this week after a snail species never seen locally before was spotted on the outside of a shipping container, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The Acusta sp. snail species could have posed "a significant agriculture threat because they cause damage by feeding on agricultural and horticultural crops as well as native plants, thereby lowering crop yields and crop quality," CBP officials said Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 2010
Hummer, the off-road vehicle that once symbolized America's love for hulking SUVs, faces a shutdown after its sale to a Chinese heavy equipment maker collapsed. Sichuan Tengzhong Heavy Industrial Machines Co. said Wednesday it pulled out of the deal to buy the company from General Motors Co. Tengzhong failed to get clearance from Chinese regulators within the proposed time frame for the sale, the Chinese manufacturer said. GM said it will continue to honor existing Hummer warranties. "GM will now work closely with Hummer employees, dealers and suppliers to wind down the business in an orderly and responsible manner," said John Smith, GM vice president of corporate planning and alliances.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The flowering branches of Mulan magnolia that grace the cover of Joan Lok's new book on Chinese brush painting appear more brightly colored than in her original work, probably to catch the eye of someone browsing in a bookstore, guesses the author. The Columbia resident says she is pleased with the quality of paper used for the book and the way the reproductions of her original flower paintings neatly fit with the detailed instructions on the soft-cover book's 128 pages. And the longtime federal employee is also happy her first how-to book will be available at bookshops and at a local chain of craft stores, tapping into a marketing niche.
NEWS
By Pravda, Moscow | May 30, 1991
MUTUAL trust is the cornerstone of Soviet-Chinese relations. It stems from mutual understanding, and summit meetings are the most direct route to it. . . .Soviet-Chinese relations are only now beginning to exert a stabilizing influence on the regional and global political climate. . . .The agreement on the eastern stretch of the Soviet-Chinese state border, signed during the Moscow meeting, open prospects for turning the world's longest continental border into a frontier of good neighborliness.
NEWS
By NANCY BERNKOPF TUCKER | November 28, 1991
Washington. -- Was James Baker's trip to China a failure? Neither the Chinese nor the Americans made any significant concessions, though some valuable compromises on transfer of nuclear technology, copyright protection and prison-labor exports may have been reached.That there remains uncertainty regarding what the Chinese actually agreed to reflects Chinese disinclination to surrender freedom of action and the probable necessity of brokering adherence of the military to politically determined policies.
NEWS
March 24, 1999
The Los Angeles Times said in an editorial yesterday:THE United States is probably a decade or more away from being able to deploy a system in East Asia to defend its forces and allies there against low-altitude missiles, but China is already threatening to turn that prospect into a source of contention.Beijing claims that such a system would provide the Japanese with a protective shield behind which they could develop offensive missiles to threaten China. It further fears seeing its strategic advantage diminished if the United States shares missile defense technology with Taiwan.
FEATURES
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 3, 1999
BEIJING -- At first glance, it seemed like a terrific formula: a Chinese folk tale filled with adventure, Disney's masterful animation and tens of millions of Chinese children raised on Western movies.But instead of cashing in at the box office, Walt Disney's "Mulan" has bombed in her ancestral homeland."Mulan," which has grossed about $300 million worldwide, is the legendary story of a brave young Chinese woman who joins the army during the Sui Dynasty (589-618 A.D.) in place of her sick, elderly father.
NEWS
By JOSHUA EISENMAN | February 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As the Jack Abramoff scandal arouses scrutiny of Washington lobbying, China is cashing into the game of political influence on Capitol Hill. Beijing is spending millions of dollars to secure its U.S. interests, improve its image and counter skepticism of Chinese intentions and values. This is a new development, and it will come under scrutiny today at a hearing of a House International Relations Committee panel. For years, Beijing enjoyed a low profile in Washington, allowing the U.S. business community to lobby for the bilateral economic relationship; both benefited.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | February 21, 1994
BEIJING -- Despite the release of some prominent dissidents from Chinese jails last year, repression here worsened with almost 250 documented cases of new political arrests or trials, a major new report on Chinese political prisoners says.The report -- released yesterday by Asia Watch, the human rights group -- contains information on about 1,700 persons known or believed to be imprisoned in China for their political, ethnic or religious views and activities.Asia Watch says it represents "the most complete available accounting of political and religious imprisonment in China today."
NEWS
By Xiaohui Wu | August 3, 2014
As a foreigner in the United States, one question I've often been asked by newly-met friends has been "What do you find special about America?" I always have a good answer for that question: "Education. " American children have colorful lives while their Chinese peers are locked up in studies. Surprisingly, many of my American friends are not as optimistic about the American system. In fact, they've told me it's the U.S. education system that's problematic and perhaps should learn from the Chinese system.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
As the nation observes Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month in May, students and staff at a scholastic program in Columbia can boast that they highlight Chinese heritage year round. Each Sunday, they gather at Howard Community College in Columbia for Howard County Chinese School, a program that offers lessons on Chinese language and culture for students in kindergarten through the 10th grade, as well as for adults. Launched in 1998 with about 80 students, the school has grown to about 1,000 school-age enrollees and 400 adults, and has a faculty that includes instructors who taught at schools in China.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As Judy Greiner strolled through San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid-20th century, she couldn't help noticing that the bespectacled Jewish bubbes and tattooed Asian gamblers were eyeing one another with wary respect. You wouldn't want to meet a representative of either group in a dark alley - at least, not if they were brandishing a mah-jongg set. Chances were that you'd stagger away hours later with an empty wallet and no clear recollection of how that sad state of affairs had come to pass.
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 30, 2014
As the song "Timber" rocked through the speakers, the crowd gathered for River Hill High School's Cultural Awareness Night couldn't stay seated - soon everyone joined in for a Zumba demonstration. "I did Zumba," laughed Amy Hairston, the schools choral director, catching her breath. As faculty sponsor of the River Hill's Cultural Awareness Club, which organized the March 25 festivities, Hairston was enjoying herself after all the work the group put into organizing the night. "This is the third year I spearheaded this," Hairston said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Chieh "Jeffrey" Huang, a retired civil engineer who was a founder of the Chinese Language School of Baltimore, died Jan. 21 of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 78. Mr. Huang was born in Beijing. After the Communists took over mainland China in 1950, he fled with his family to Taiwan, where he graduated from high school. He earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1957 from National Taiwan University. In 1960, he came to the U.S. to study for a master's degree in civil engineering, which he earned in 1962 from the University of Minnesota.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | December 11, 2013
As Grace Lee Chou rang a brass school bell by hand in the hallways of Loch Raven High School on a recent Sunday afternoon, television sets in many area homes were tuned into the Ravens game and families were busy with typical weekend activities. But six first- and second-graders were soon hard at work in a classroom, repeating letters and consonant blends in unison as their teacher, Julie Liu, pointed to them one by one on a chalkboard. The children were competing to see who could recite the letters the loudest and who could get the most correct, a scene common in schools the world over.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 3, 1997
HONG KONG S.A.R., China -- There is something eerie about watching a fireworks display in Hong Kong on June 30 and returning home to Washington to watch more fireworks on July 4.The one is a leave-taking of British sovereignty and the passing ++ of a colonial territory back to its original owners. The other is an observance of a philosophy of life and government based on the rule of law that is reshaping the world in a way that will eventually include China.Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher busily told all who would listen of her optimism that Hong Kong has less to fear from China than China has to fear from Hong Kong.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2007
BEIJING -- The heightened anger and fear felt by the average Chinese over the safety of food, medicine and other consumer products were vividly on display here yesterday after the execution of the former head of China's food and drug safety agency. Within hours of an announcement that Zheng Xiaoyu, 62, had been put to death for taking bribes from pharmaceutical companies, China's Internet lit up. "Good job!" said an anonymous posting on Sina.com, a major Chinese web portal. "He deserves it," said another writing as Lgzxm2005.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Date: Sept. 28 Her story: Katelyn Niu, 29, was born in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Province, China, and moved to Maryland in 2000. She graduated with doctor of dental surgery and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Maryland, Baltimore in May and is an associate dentist in Hagerstown. Her mother, Ming Bell, and stepfather, Stephen Bell, live in Ellicott City. His story: Kevin Yang, 29, was born in Fuzhou, Fujian Province, China. He moved to Woodbury, N.J., with his family in 1996 before relocating to Cumberland a year later.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 20, 2013
It would make things so much easier for everyone if Edward Snowden were working for China. And that's certainly a possibility. His decision to flee to Hong Kong -- a Chinese vassal -- was an odd one, given that China is hardly a bulwark of transparency and civil rights. It's a bit like complaining that Boston is too Catholic and then moving to Vatican City in protest. Then there's the nature of the crime itself. Informed sources I've spoken with are generally aghast by what they say is the scope of information Mr. Snowden stole, material some believe he couldn't have gotten by himself.
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