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By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 26, 2006
Henry Seim of Parkville says the Weather Page "sometimes gives different ocean temperatures and wave heights between Ocean City and Assateague Island. How could that be when the island is only about 1,000 feet south of Ocean City?" Wave height data for both come from a data buoy 15 miles off Fenwick so predictions should agree unless forecasters tweak one. O.C. water temperatures are measured several feet below the same buoy. Assateague's come from Chincoteague Bay, 17 miles south of the inlet.
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NEWS
July 6, 2010
For tourists streaming into Ocean City this summer, the coastal bays are easily overlooked. To many they are merely the broad, sparkling waters — glimpsed briefly from the family sedan along U.S. 50 or Route 90, perhaps — that must be crossed on the way to the sandy beaches and rough and tumble of the Atlantic Ocean surf. But from an ecological standpoint, they provide as valuable a wildlife habitat as any found within their big sister estuary to the west, the Chesapeake Bay. Their sea grass beds are a nursery to dozens of varieties of fish and shellfish, their islands a haven for water birds like the brown pelicans that have made a year-round home here.
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NEWS
By Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | June 12, 2008
Gary Stag of Severna Park is a surf fisherman. He is baffled by the cold water he feels while fishing at Assateague Island and the comparatively higher temperatures listed below for the island. "Where in the heck do they measure that water temperature for Assateague?" he asks. Our label is misleading. The sensor is at Public Landing, Md., on the west side of Chincoteague Bay. Calm, toasty bay water. For Assateague ocean temperatures, see Ocean City's, measured at an offshore data buoy.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Maryland's coastal bays, the inland waterways that cradle the state's Atlantic beach resort, remain in better shape overall than the Chesapeake Bay, according to their latest ecological report card released Wednesday. But beneath that good news lurks a troubling trend. The shallow estuaries behind Ocean City and Assateague Island rated a C+ overall in 2009, the same grade they received for 2008. There were some signs of improvement in the most degraded areas — the northern bays and western tributaries — offset by continuing declines in water quality in Chincoteague Bay, the largest and least developed of the entire inland bay system.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Maryland's coastal bays, the inland waterways that cradle the state's Atlantic beach resort, remain in better shape overall than the Chesapeake Bay, according to their latest ecological report card released Wednesday. But beneath that good news lurks a troubling trend. The shallow estuaries behind Ocean City and Assateague Island rated a C+ overall in 2009, the same grade they received for 2008. There were some signs of improvement in the most degraded areas — the northern bays and western tributaries — offset by continuing declines in water quality in Chincoteague Bay, the largest and least developed of the entire inland bay system.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2000
SMOKEHOUSE COVE - A potential killer so small that scientists need special equipment to detect it swims in these waters off the St. Martin River. Given the right conditions, it could destroy underwater grasses and starve shellfish, which is why state officials are keeping track of it. Every two weeks in the spring and fall, state Department of Natural Resources and National Park Service crews take water samples near this Worcester County marsh and at...
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | October 31, 2006
An Eastern Shore judge has rejected a property owner's claim that the state should not have leased land on the bottom of Chincoteague Bay to a fledgling aquaculture business that has been raising clams in the bed. David and Jena Harvey, Pennsylvania residents who own property in Girdletree, had argued that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources had no right to let Steve and Christy Gordon use the public bottom to grow clams. Worcester County Circuit Judge Theodore R. Eschenburg Sr. threw out the claim, though he agreed with the Harveys' contention that the state surveyed the property incorrectly and that the Gordons would have to give up the bed - at least until DNR can resurvey it. DNR officials said they believe Gordon can keep the clams on the bed for 90 days while a survey is done.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
CHINCOTEAGUE BAY -- It began as an experiment, almost a lark. A curious crew of state shellfish biologists wondered whether they could bring back a healthy population of bay scallops here, more than 60 years after an aquatic plague wiped them out.Mark Homer didn't mean to fall in love. But when 36 iridescent blue eyes met his two green ones, he was a goner."They're cute," said Homer, who has spent the past two years watching over the 1.2 million hatchery-bred bay scallops he has tucked away in a secret, sheltered spot.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2002
CHINCOTEAGUE BAY - The first sign of spring here lies under the sea, and it isn't a joy to behold. Imagine the most tangled spool of fishing line you've ever seen. Multiply it till it's 3 feet wide and 10 feet long, and color it a lurid green. This is chaetomorpha, a form of underwater plant life that is growing fast in the shallow waters along Assateague Island National Seashore. Until two years ago, fishermen had seen only a few tiny patches of the stuff in these waters, which were once believed to be some of the most pristine in the state.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
ALL MARYLAND IS divided among three watersheds, though you might not know it given the attention to the Chesapeake Bay, whose drainage basin includes most of the state, and most of our environmental attention.A lesser-known one is the Gulf of Mexico, whose drainage extends to the westward-sloping sliver of Garrett County between Backbone Mountain and West Virginia.The gulf's problems may be greater than the Chesapeake's, with a "dead zone" of low-oxygen water that some years covers thousands of square miles.
NEWS
By Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | June 12, 2008
Gary Stag of Severna Park is a surf fisherman. He is baffled by the cold water he feels while fishing at Assateague Island and the comparatively higher temperatures listed below for the island. "Where in the heck do they measure that water temperature for Assateague?" he asks. Our label is misleading. The sensor is at Public Landing, Md., on the west side of Chincoteague Bay. Calm, toasty bay water. For Assateague ocean temperatures, see Ocean City's, measured at an offshore data buoy.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 26, 2006
Henry Seim of Parkville says the Weather Page "sometimes gives different ocean temperatures and wave heights between Ocean City and Assateague Island. How could that be when the island is only about 1,000 feet south of Ocean City?" Wave height data for both come from a data buoy 15 miles off Fenwick so predictions should agree unless forecasters tweak one. O.C. water temperatures are measured several feet below the same buoy. Assateague's come from Chincoteague Bay, 17 miles south of the inlet.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | October 31, 2006
An Eastern Shore judge has rejected a property owner's claim that the state should not have leased land on the bottom of Chincoteague Bay to a fledgling aquaculture business that has been raising clams in the bed. David and Jena Harvey, Pennsylvania residents who own property in Girdletree, had argued that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources had no right to let Steve and Christy Gordon use the public bottom to grow clams. Worcester County Circuit Judge Theodore R. Eschenburg Sr. threw out the claim, though he agreed with the Harveys' contention that the state surveyed the property incorrectly and that the Gordons would have to give up the bed - at least until DNR can resurvey it. DNR officials said they believe Gordon can keep the clams on the bed for 90 days while a survey is done.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2002
CHINCOTEAGUE BAY - The first sign of spring here lies under the sea, and it isn't a joy to behold. Imagine the most tangled spool of fishing line you've ever seen. Multiply it till it's 3 feet wide and 10 feet long, and color it a lurid green. This is chaetomorpha, a form of underwater plant life that is growing fast in the shallow waters along Assateague Island National Seashore. Until two years ago, fishermen had seen only a few tiny patches of the stuff in these waters, which were once believed to be some of the most pristine in the state.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
SOUTH POINT -- From her back yard, Phyllis Koenings has a panoramic view of one of the last nearly pristine stretches of Maryland's coastal bays. Soon, though, Koenings will have to share her vista of waterfowl winging across the sparkling water. Just a brisk walk from the two-story Colonial where she has lived since 1993, bulldozers have cut roads through woods so 32 homes can be built. For those who can afford it, waterfront lots are going for $475,000 each. The housing project, subdivided and recorded in the Worcester County land office nearly 12 years ago, highlights the hurdles facing state and local officials as they move in an awkward partnership to curb development pressure that threatens the five ecologically fragile coastal bays.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2000
SMOKEHOUSE COVE - A potential killer so small that scientists need special equipment to detect it swims in these waters off the St. Martin River. Given the right conditions, it could destroy underwater grasses and starve shellfish, which is why state officials are keeping track of it. Every two weeks in the spring and fall, state Department of Natural Resources and National Park Service crews take water samples near this Worcester County marsh and at...
NEWS
July 6, 2010
For tourists streaming into Ocean City this summer, the coastal bays are easily overlooked. To many they are merely the broad, sparkling waters — glimpsed briefly from the family sedan along U.S. 50 or Route 90, perhaps — that must be crossed on the way to the sandy beaches and rough and tumble of the Atlantic Ocean surf. But from an ecological standpoint, they provide as valuable a wildlife habitat as any found within their big sister estuary to the west, the Chesapeake Bay. Their sea grass beds are a nursery to dozens of varieties of fish and shellfish, their islands a haven for water birds like the brown pelicans that have made a year-round home here.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
A month after pledging to protect Maryland's distressed coastal bays, Worcester County's commissioners have sparked a furor by moving to ease a restriction on shoreline development.Responding to the complaints of a local businessman and developer, county officials are considering amending a regulation that requires builders of new waterfront homes to leave a 25-foot strip of trees, shrubs and tall grass along the shoreline.The 3-year-old rule is intended to protect the bays by controlling erosion and runoff of fertilizers and pesticides.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1998
CHINCOTEAGUE BAY -- It began as an experiment, almost a lark. A curious crew of state shellfish biologists wondered whether they could bring back a healthy population of bay scallops here, more than 60 years after an aquatic plague wiped them out.Mark Homer didn't mean to fall in love. But when 36 iridescent blue eyes met his two green ones, he was a goner."They're cute," said Homer, who has spent the past two years watching over the 1.2 million hatchery-bred bay scallops he has tucked away in a secret, sheltered spot.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
A month after pledging to protect Maryland's distressed coastal bays, Worcester County's commissioners have sparked a furor by moving to ease a restriction on shoreline development.Responding to the complaints of a local businessman and developer, county officials are considering amending a regulation that requires builders of new waterfront homes to leave a 25-foot strip of trees, shrubs and tall grass along the shoreline.The 3-year-old rule is intended to protect the bays by controlling erosion and runoff of fertilizers and pesticides.
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