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Chinatown

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NEWS
By Yilu Zhao and Yilu Zhao,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 2002
NEW YORK - It had to happen eventually. Chinatown already spills over into two neighborhoods moving from modest to mod: Little Italy and the Lower East Side. And it is just a cell phone's throw from TriBeCa and SoHo. Gentrification was bound to come to Chinatown. Now that it has arrived, the neighborhood is experiencing the usual side effects, including landlords trying to evict longtime tenants who pay very little rent in favor of deep-pocketed bond traders. But this time there is a twist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As Judy Greiner strolled through San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid-20th century, she couldn't help noticing that the bespectacled Jewish bubbes and tattooed Asian gamblers were eyeing one another with wary respect. You wouldn't want to meet a representative of either group in a dark alley - at least, not if they were brandishing a mah-jongg set. Chances were that you'd stagger away hours later with an empty wallet and no clear recollection of how that sad state of affairs had come to pass.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | March 2, 2008
An elderly man with thick glasses lugs a bag of sweet rice from a grocery store onto a rundown street. In a nearby building, a faded dragon's head grimaces in a hallway hung with yellowed photos. Across the street, a painted wall advertises "family dinners served all hours" at the long-gone China Inn. These are among the few remaining vestiges of the city's Chinatown, a Park Avenue block that once had bustling restaurants, stores and meeting halls, as well as exuberant Lunar New Year's parades.
TRAVEL
By Tribune Newspapers | November 1, 2009
What's your favorite city in the U.S. to visit? If you picked San Francisco, you'd be in line with Conde Nast Traveler readers who voted it the No. 1 U.S. city in the 2009 Readers' Choice Awards featured in this month's issue. Criteria included atmosphere, culture, friendliness, lodging, restaurants and shopping. San Francisco fared especially well in - you guessed it - restaurants. But the city boasts many lures, and they are apparently consistent. This is the 17th consecutive year that San Francisco has won this category in the annual survey.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2000
WASHINGTON - From his family's tiny basement grocery store in the heart of Chinatown, William Chin has watched his community change over the past 50 years. The throngs of Cantonese-speaking people milling about H Street in the 1950s have disappeared, and many Chinese restaurants and stores have moved to the Maryland and Virginia suburbs. Today, Chinatown's regulars tend to be tourists, nearby office workers and more tourists. And along with the new crowd, Chin has watched a wave of Chinese businesses move out in recent years to make way for a new breed of commercial activity in his neighborhood - the MCI Center, chain restaurants like Ruby Tuesday and, come September 2002, a 21-screen AMC movie theater.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 2002
NEW YORK - The effects of the World Trade Center attack included layoffs of about one-fourth of Chinatown's 34,000 workers, and economic ripples in Queens and Brooklyn, because half of Chinatown's workers live outside Manhattan, according to a new report released Thursday. Chinatown accounts for 1 percent of New York City's employment, but 10 percent of the jobs lost in the three months after Sept. 11, the authors of the report said - or about 7,500 of the 75,000 jobs lost in that period.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2002
NEW YORK - Where have all the lovebirds gone? Sio Wang Sang, the owner of Golden Jade jewelers on Canal Street, says it's been more than a week since he sold an engagement ring in his Chinatown store. Before Sept. 11, Sang sold five to 10 engagement rings a week, many of them to upwardly mobile, or at least upwardly aspiring, young men who worked in the nearby financial firms of Lower Manhattan. The men used to walk to Canal Street after work to seek advice on the subtleties of marquise, princess and pear-cut diamonds.
TOPIC
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
The coming of the Chinese New Year in Baltimore was announced this year by a tattered lion dancing in what was once known as Baltimore's Chinatown. The old lion's head - made of papier-mache and now held together by tape - looked much like its surroundings: faded colors, frayed edges with a general appearance of deterioration. "Chinatown isn't what it used to be," explained the lion's owner Arthur Lee after 10 minutes of dancing in front of a small crowd, which consisted mostly of bewildered white parishioners from an Episcopal church.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 17, 2004
NEW YORK - The shelves of the Wah Kue hobby shop are almost empty, and the boys who cluster in the back of the barren store are there to show off their collections of Japanese trading cards, not to buy anything. Soon Yee, the co-owner of this Chinatown fixture for the past 20 years, has all but made up his mind to quit the business. "Things are bad in Chinatown since 9/11," says Yee, 49, ringing up a rare sale - a can of soda. "We used to get a lot of tourists. The streets were so crowded, people were bumping into each other."
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | August 3, 2008
The Disneyland Encyclopedia, Santa Monica Press, $19.95 If your vacation plans include a trip to Disneyland, a new book by Chris Strodder can make you an expert on "The Happiest Place on Earth." The book is an A-to-Z guide to 500 people, places and things that have been part of the theme park during its 53-year history. It includes a section on the plans for park attractions that never got built, such as Chinatown and Big Rock Candy Mountain. Chinatown was to be built in 1959 just off Main Street.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | August 3, 2008
The Disneyland Encyclopedia, Santa Monica Press, $19.95 If your vacation plans include a trip to Disneyland, a new book by Chris Strodder can make you an expert on "The Happiest Place on Earth." The book is an A-to-Z guide to 500 people, places and things that have been part of the theme park during its 53-year history. It includes a section on the plans for park attractions that never got built, such as Chinatown and Big Rock Candy Mountain. Chinatown was to be built in 1959 just off Main Street.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | March 2, 2008
An elderly man with thick glasses lugs a bag of sweet rice from a grocery store onto a rundown street. In a nearby building, a faded dragon's head grimaces in a hallway hung with yellowed photos. Across the street, a painted wall advertises "family dinners served all hours" at the long-gone China Inn. These are among the few remaining vestiges of the city's Chinatown, a Park Avenue block that once had bustling restaurants, stores and meeting halls, as well as exuberant Lunar New Year's parades.
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | July 6, 2006
It's a strange place to wake up, this patch of grass beside a truck stop just yards from the traffic streaming toward Interstate 95. But when Kelvin Kong found himself there, rubbing the sleep from his eyes as the sun rose last Saturday morning, he did what any roll-with-the-punches budget traveler does when he has to. He looked on the bright side. "It's not every day you get to camp out next to a highway," the 17-year-old visitor from New York said, laughing. "I've never been to Baltimore before, and I'll never forget this."
TOPIC
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
The coming of the Chinese New Year in Baltimore was announced this year by a tattered lion dancing in what was once known as Baltimore's Chinatown. The old lion's head - made of papier-mache and now held together by tape - looked much like its surroundings: faded colors, frayed edges with a general appearance of deterioration. "Chinatown isn't what it used to be," explained the lion's owner Arthur Lee after 10 minutes of dancing in front of a small crowd, which consisted mostly of bewildered white parishioners from an Episcopal church.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 17, 2004
NEW YORK - The shelves of the Wah Kue hobby shop are almost empty, and the boys who cluster in the back of the barren store are there to show off their collections of Japanese trading cards, not to buy anything. Soon Yee, the co-owner of this Chinatown fixture for the past 20 years, has all but made up his mind to quit the business. "Things are bad in Chinatown since 9/11," says Yee, 49, ringing up a rare sale - a can of soda. "We used to get a lot of tourists. The streets were so crowded, people were bumping into each other."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2004
A few weeks ago, an acquaintance asked me if I knew a good place for dim sum. At the time, I had to admit I didn't. In fact, I didn't know of a single place in the Baltimore area that served it. Dim sum - basically Cantonese-style noshes that can range from green bean sheet rolls to steamed snail - is not offered at the average strip-mall Chinese takeout. But now I know that an excellent assortment is served at Chinatown Cafe. The 2-year-old restaurant, helmed by Joann and Wuen Cheung Wu, attracts a multi-ethnic crowd despite its so-so Park Avenue location.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 8, 1998
BRADLEY BEACH, N.J. -- Family after family, they flocked to this tiny, tranquil Jersey shore town from Mulberry Street in Manhattan's Little Italy - Italian-Americans hungry for a summer escape from urban congestion.It started in the 1950s, and Anna Mingione was one of the pioneers, spreading the word to neighbors in the city about the fragrance of the sea, the glow of the sand, the family atmosphere of the area. Then, one day in 1959, as Mingione pushed a baby carriage past a row of charming bungalows, she was startled to see another familiar face.
TRAVEL
By Tribune Newspapers | November 1, 2009
What's your favorite city in the U.S. to visit? If you picked San Francisco, you'd be in line with Conde Nast Traveler readers who voted it the No. 1 U.S. city in the 2009 Readers' Choice Awards featured in this month's issue. Criteria included atmosphere, culture, friendliness, lodging, restaurants and shopping. San Francisco fared especially well in - you guessed it - restaurants. But the city boasts many lures, and they are apparently consistent. This is the 17th consecutive year that San Francisco has won this category in the annual survey.
NEWS
By Yilu Zhao and Yilu Zhao,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 2002
NEW YORK - It had to happen eventually. Chinatown already spills over into two neighborhoods moving from modest to mod: Little Italy and the Lower East Side. And it is just a cell phone's throw from TriBeCa and SoHo. Gentrification was bound to come to Chinatown. Now that it has arrived, the neighborhood is experiencing the usual side effects, including landlords trying to evict longtime tenants who pay very little rent in favor of deep-pocketed bond traders. But this time there is a twist.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2002
NEW YORK - Where have all the lovebirds gone? Sio Wang Sang, the owner of Golden Jade jewelers on Canal Street, says it's been more than a week since he sold an engagement ring in his Chinatown store. Before Sept. 11, Sang sold five to 10 engagement rings a week, many of them to upwardly mobile, or at least upwardly aspiring, young men who worked in the nearby financial firms of Lower Manhattan. The men used to walk to Canal Street after work to seek advice on the subtleties of marquise, princess and pear-cut diamonds.
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