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NEWS
June 2, 1991
It is unfortunate that President Bush chose to invoke "morality" to justify his decision to seek renewal of normal trading relations with China. "Morality" was the least of his considerations. His concern was strictly geopolitical, as seen through the prism (critics call it his blind eye) of his own diplomatic experience in Beijing.Despite China's human rights violations, its regressive Marxism, its irresponsible sales of missiles and nuclear equipment and its unfair trading practices, Mr. Bush determined it was in America's interest to continue so-called most-favored-nation trade policies with China.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
The twin tasks of improving relations between Washington and Beijing and shrinking the enormous U.S. trade deficit to a manageable size depend to a large degree on China importing more American goods and services. That's partly the job of Donald Tong. As Hong Kong's commissioner for economic and trade affairs in the United States, Tong has the task of building trans-Pacific ties and promoting that special Chinese administrative district as a destination for U.S. exports, not just a source of imports.
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NEWS
June 13, 1997
HOW LONG, pray tell, will the U.S. Congress go through the annual charade of pretending it is really, honest-to-gosh thinking of ending normal trade relations with China?Perhaps as long as Nancy Pelosi, a California liberal, and Christopher Smith, a New Jersey religious conservative, find common cause in assailing Beijing's deplorable human rights record; or House minority leader Richard Gephardt pushes his campaign for the presidency.As everyone on Capitol Hill well knows, the latest effort to rescind the mis-named "most favored nation" (MFN)
NEWS
By Peter Morici | May 3, 2009
To dig out of the "Great Recession," Washington needs to challenge China on trade and currency manipulation - but President Barack Obama and Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner must recognize that Beijing only has the leverage Washington gives it. The nation needs to realize that this is no Eisenhower recession, caused by too much inventory. Rather, this meltdown was caused by structural imbalances in the global economy that no stimulus spending can fix. Dysfunctions on Wall Street notwithstanding, China and several other developing countries produce far more than they consume and enjoy huge trade surpluses, thanks to artificially undervalued currencies, export subsidies and import restrictions.
NEWS
May 16, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON will not allow himself to be seen as soft on China's cheating on trade commitments during the election campaign. The trade war that continued building yesterday probably will be contained until November and resolved later. It has the virtue of being about genuine trade issues and not about other matters in dispute between two great countries.U.S. officials say that Chinese firms pirated U.S. music, films, books, software and patents to the annual tune of $2.3 billion in lost sales since China agreed in February 1995 to stop the practice.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2000
WASHINGTON - As the vote nears in the House on a major China trade bill, Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin is one of the most prominent lawmakers still wavering. His indecision has allowed pressure to build from allies on all sides of the issue - from his wife, Myrna, to constituents on the street, to labor union officials, to corporate executives, to his congressional colleagues, to President Clinton himself. "People don't fully understand the impact of China," said the Baltimore Democrat. "I think there is a lot of anxiety about international trade.
NEWS
April 11, 1999
PRESIDENT Clinton and China's Prime Minister Zhu Rongji must be taken at their word that they failed to reach an agreement to pave the entry of China into the World Trade Organization.But some skepticism is in order after Mr. Zhu's two-day stop in Washington. They announced substantial progress long sought by U.S. business and farm interests.China will drop barriers to an array of U.S. farm produce. This is particularly welcome to wheat growers of the Northwest and the hard-pressed pork industry.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 18, 2000
WASHINGTON - President Clinton's campaign to open up China's huge market to U.S. goods gained a big boost yesterday, when two key committees gave overwhelming approval to legislation that would normalize trade relations with Beijing. In the House, several wavering Democrats threw their crucial support behind the measure after Republican leaders agreed to provisions that would require close monitoring of Beijing's human rights record and protect U.S. markets against surges of Chinese goods.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | December 15, 1991
As the end of the century approaches, authors and publishers are rushing to document public and private collections, recording for posterity the unsurpassed penchant for antique collecting in the 20th century.The glossy, illustrated books for gift giving this holiday season survey such things as the antique treasures of the State Department, antique garden ornaments, the decorative arts of the China Trade and the Winchester rifle."Treasures of State, Fine and Decorative Arts in the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the U.S. Department of State," edited by Alexandra Rollins (Abrams, $95)
NEWS
June 17, 2004
IN THE PAST YEAR, some large foreign investors were for the first time allowed to enter China's domestic stock market to buy shares of Chinese firms. This includes shares of part of Norinco, China North Industries Group - a transnational conglomerate that was founded by the People's Liberation Army, that retains strong military ties, that makes everything from baby shoes to missiles, and that has drawn U.S. sanctions for arming Iran. Given the lack of disclosure in China, foreign investors and technology traders with Norinco and other Chinese firms cannot know if their resources will end up serving China's long-term, well-coordinated strategic plan to compete with American economic, military and political power.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 11, 2007
HONG KONG -- China's trade surplus in 2006 soared to $177.47 billion, far more than in any previous year on record, as the country's exports continued to grow briskly, the Chinese customs administration said last night. China's widening trade surplus - it was $102 billion in 2005 - has been a slowly festering issue in its relationship with the United States, one of its major trading partners. In Washington, Democratic Party leaders have promised to give it greater attention this year, now that they control both houses of Congress.
BUSINESS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - China's bid to buy such marquee American companies as Unocal Corp. and Maytag Corp. prompted a strong political reaction in Congress yesterday, with some lawmakers calling on the Bush administration to take a tougher stance against Beijing's trade policies and investigate its effort to take over a major U.S. oil company. Many economists said China is trying to hedge its bets by trying to purchase Unocal, hoping to nail down supplies in case of any future disruptions in the oil market.
NEWS
June 17, 2004
IN THE PAST YEAR, some large foreign investors were for the first time allowed to enter China's domestic stock market to buy shares of Chinese firms. This includes shares of part of Norinco, China North Industries Group - a transnational conglomerate that was founded by the People's Liberation Army, that retains strong military ties, that makes everything from baby shoes to missiles, and that has drawn U.S. sanctions for arming Iran. Given the lack of disclosure in China, foreign investors and technology traders with Norinco and other Chinese firms cannot know if their resources will end up serving China's long-term, well-coordinated strategic plan to compete with American economic, military and political power.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 2003
BEIJING - Treasury Secretary John W. Snow and his Chinese counterparts agreed yesterday that China should eventually allow its currency to trade freely on international markets. But Beijing rejected calls to move quickly in that direction, saying such action might cause financial instability in China and abroad. Snow faces political pressure at home to push China to raise the value of its currency, the yuan. Some Democratic presidential candidates and industry groups have argued that China keeps the currency deliberately undervalued to promote exports to America, which they claim has caused job losses in the United States.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and David Folkenflik and Tom Bowman and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - When the House voted Wednesday to grant China permanent normal trading privileges, Rep. Duncan Hunter led a band of conservatives who warned that the vote would help the bellicose Communist nation rebuild its military to threaten the United States. "Whichever side of this debate one is on, everyone here has to concede American dollars are arming Communist China today," said Hunter, a California Republican, likening the global situation to 1941 and the sudden American realization that Japan was a danger.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 2000
WASHINGTON - After a rare but effective collaboration between President Clinton and Republican congressional leaders, the House voted with surprising ease yesterday to grant China permanent normal trade relations. The 237-197 vote sent the trade bill on to what is expected to be speedy approval in the Senate. It concluded the year's most contentious debate with a victory that Clinton viewed as perhaps his last chance to add luster to his legacy before he leaves office. "I have always believed that by opening markets abroad, we open opportunities at home, and we have worked hard to advance that goal," the president said afterward.
NEWS
By Charlene Barshefsky | May 22, 2000
IN THE coming weeks, Maryland's congressional representatives will vote on an American trade and foreign policy goal of historic importance: Extending permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR) to China as it enters the World Trade Organization. From the trade perspective, this decision is stark and simple. In November, after years of negotiation, we reached a bilateral agreement with China on WTO entry. This agreement secures comprehensive, one-way concessions, which open the markets of the world's largest nation to U.S. exports, strengthen our guarantees of fair trade and give us far greater ability to enforce China's trade commitments.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 2000
WASHINGTON - Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. of Baltimore County is young and ambitious, with visions of the governor's mansion beckoning in the distance. In just five years on Capitol Hill, Ehrlich has advanced quickly through the ranks of House Republicans, partly on the strength of his ability to push pro-business policies with a friendly demeanor that doesn't tend to alienate union voters. Yet Ehrlich plans to vote today against the China trade bill, which most Republican leaders and business groups consider their chief legislative priority this year.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 2000
WASHINGTON - Concluding a frenetic round of last-minute horse-trading, President Clinton and Republican congressional leaders appeared likely to score a narrow victory today in the House to grant China permanent normal trade relations. Even so, organized labor, human rights advocates and other opponents of the bill lobbied intensely yesterday in hopes of pulling off an upset by gaining the votes of uncommitted members. But as more and more members held news conferences to announce their support - often after meeting with Clinton administration officials or business leaders - the momentum seemed to be moving toward approval of the measure.
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