Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChina
IN THE NEWS

China

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 23, 2010
America has suddenly become aware that there is a trade problem with China ("Export policy No. 1: getting China to play by the rules," Sept. 21). Once again, who could have predicted it? The American public is an addict. China is our supplier and the big discount chain stores are the dealers. We are addicted to easy money and bargain prices. The problem is that now we recognize that this is killing us and we want out of the arrangement. Whatever the solution, when an addict and his supplier break up, somebody is going to get hurt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 7, 2014
I read your article about the proposed maglev train with interest but was surprised that you did not write more about the one that is operational in Shanghai, China ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). It was built by Siemens and runs from downtown to the airport. I rode on it and they have a speed meter on it which gets to 400 kilometers per hour (or 260 miles per hour). It was very smooth and comfortable. One interesting thing our guide mentioned is that all of the drivers are women because the men would not go fast enough for the schedule.
Advertisement
EXPLORE
November 8, 2011
Historically speaking, China is a society that holds learning and education in high esteem. It's hardly alone in that respect. The emphasis on learning in the Chinese Confucian tradition are comparable to the learning-focused philosophies of Aristotle and  Socrates, which are underpinnings of western culture. China, it's also worth noting, is a key U.S. trading partner and a rapidly rising economic and military power, making knowledge of modern China a key intellectual commodity in the coming years.
NEWS
By Yuwei Zhang | July 13, 2014
Marching in an Independence Day Parade is not supposed to be a gut-wrenching experience, but for me last weekend in Philadelphia, it was. Don't get me wrong; I love playing my waist drum, in my waist-drum troupe. It's just that July 4th always triggers memories of the day I left behind my husband and child in China, to escape to America. I recall secretly wiping away my tears so that my mom wouldn't see the depth of my sadness. I told my 1-month-old daughter, who was fast asleep, "I promise you a bright future, but for now, mommy has to leave you here in China.
NEWS
June 21, 2010
When the Federal Reserve Open Market Committee meets Wednesday, no one expects it to raise the federal funds rate — the overnight bank rate that now hovers below 0.25 percent. However, businesses, politicians and prognosticators are eager, perhaps inappropriately so, to hear clues about when it will begin raising short-term interest rates to a more normal level. Yet, Fed policy is much less relevant to U.S. growth and price stability than in the days of Paul Volcker, because China's yuan policy has substantially limited the importance of Fed interest rate decisions by severing the historic link between short interest rates — like the federal funds rate it targets — and long rates on mortgages, corporate bonds and the securities banks use to finance lending on cars and credit cards.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
With no one interested in signing him in the NBA, guard Allen Iverson reportedly is considering an offer to play in China. Iverson's personal manager, Gary Moore , told NBA.com his client hasn't been been contacted by any NBA team with training camps set to open in less than two weeks. Moore said they have a "legitimate interest" with a team in China to work out a deal. Moore did not know the team's name but said the Chinese team first approached the 35-year-old Iverson last month.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
Recently, I learned the U.S. is sending our tuna, salmon and chicken to China to be packaged. The article I read also noted that China has the filthiest facilities ever, and I have been eating wild-caught salmon fillets for years thinking I was doing such healthy eating. I just took the package from the freezer and yep, it was a product of China. This is the last packaged fish I will buy from Aldi. Monday, I went in Giant to get a few things for my sister. She's 98 and very selective about her purchases.
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | October 4, 2010
It's silly season again when holders of high office fulminate about various bogeymen to demonstrate appropriate indignation ahead of elections. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner's recent testimony before both houses of Congress was a case in point, as is the bill just passed in the House of Representatives naming China a currency manipulator. Stop me if you've heard this one before. A large Asian nation rises to wealth on the strength of its exports. As a result, it builds a tremendous amount of dollar reserves — along with the increasing ire of its trading partners.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | October 18, 2013
China is poisoning its own people and making no apparent effort to stop this. Most people know about the unprecedented air pollution in major Chinese cities. For months, photos of Beijing and other cities obscured by the gray-brown muck have been on the front pages of newspapers worldwide. But even more serious problems are leading people to consume toxic rice and other foods, while also creating other shocking consequences -- like the 42 deaths and more than 1,500 serious injuries in Shaanxi province from hornet-swarm stings in recent weeks.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2010
Google postponed Tuesday the launch of its mobile phone in China, adding to the potential commercial fallout of its dispute with Beijing over Internet censorship and e-mail hacking. One person briefed on Google's decision said it was linked to the company's threat that it will shut its Chinese-based search engine if restrictions aren't eased.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
Recently, I learned the U.S. is sending our tuna, salmon and chicken to China to be packaged. The article I read also noted that China has the filthiest facilities ever, and I have been eating wild-caught salmon fillets for years thinking I was doing such healthy eating. I just took the package from the freezer and yep, it was a product of China. This is the last packaged fish I will buy from Aldi. Monday, I went in Giant to get a few things for my sister. She's 98 and very selective about her purchases.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
An agriculturally destructive moth species never before seen in the United States was found in a shipment of Chinese soybeans at the port of Baltimore, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said Friday. The insect species, Nemapogon gersimovi, could "pose a significant agriculture threat because they are known to feed on seeds and grains, reducing a farmer's yield," the agency said. The 50,000-pound shipment of bulk organic soybeans, intended as animal feed, was not allowed into the country and was exported.
NEWS
Richard J. Cross III | March 11, 2014
Symbols are meaningful in politics. Sometimes, a gesture as simple as a handshake can resonate with tremendous importance. For me, the most important handshake in American history occurred in China on February 21, 1972. By way of background, John Foster Dulles - President Dwight Eisenhower's secretary of state and a staunch anti-communist - refused to shake Chinese leader Chou En Lai's hand at a conference in Geneva in 1954. He later quipped that the only time he'd meet with Chou would be if their cars accidentally collided.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
When Emily Parker started writing columns about China and the Internet for the Wall Street Journal in 2004, she was skeptical that fledgling social media sites could make much of an impact. "I wasn't convinced that the Internet was going to be transformative," she said during a recent interview. (An edited transcript of that conversation appears below.) "I thought, 'OK, a little information will get past the censors. But, is that really going to change China?' " Over the next decade, Parker slowly became a believer, as canny Chinese "netizens" publicized information that the government wanted suppressed.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Michelle Obama and her daughters will visit China for eight days during the girls' spring break. Although I am a retired teacher and believe that education is of utmost importance, I am a bit curious as to the purpose of this trip. Educational exchange is certainly of some value, but I am concerned about the expense of this particular trip during a time when our country is in dire economic straights and we are trying to extricate ourselves from more defense spending. So who is actually footing the bill for this trip?
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Madeline Xi Cui Friedman was born in China and has lived much of her life with her family in western Howard County, but she considers herself a global citizen. The 17-year-old high school senior attends the Shanghai Community International School in China but spends much of her summer at Sharp's at Waterford Farm, a 530-acre family vegetable and livestock operation in Brookeville. At an age when many of her contemporaries might be planning spring break or post-graduation trips, Friedman has already traveled to many parts of the world, visiting several impoverished regions.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2010
BEIJING - Google Inc.'s business ties in China unraveled a little more Wednesday amid a widening backlash to the U.S. Internet company's decision to move its Chinese search engine offshore in a challenge to the country's online censorship laws. While the stand is winning Google praise in the U.S. and other countries, it's threatening to turn the company into a pariah in China. A high-profile Communist Party newspaper skewered Google in a front-page article. And more of its partners and advertising customers in the country appeared to be distancing themselves from the company.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 5, 2011
Up to 40 million Chinese people still live in caves. That's more than the populations of Texas and Illinois, combined. In fairness, a fraction of these caves are apparently pretty nice, complete with electricity and well-compacted dirt floors. But that's grading on a curve because, well, they're still caves. Meanwhile, 21 million Chinese live below what the Communist Party calls the "absolute poverty" line. That sounds pretty good if you have in mind our poverty line, which is just under $11,000 per year for an individual and roughly $22,000 for a family of four.
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | February 25, 2014
The World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland gave us an excellent window into the concerns that world leaders have about the global economy - particularly China's shadow banking system. But while the concerns may be legitimate, the expressed fear - that China will implode from the weight of the system's problems - appears overblown. Although ominous sounding, shadow banking exists in every country. In fact, the more thriving and capitalist a country's economy, the more thriving its shadow banking system typically is. What exactly is it?
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 13, 2014
The football life of former NFL running back Ricky Williams, who played the final season of his career in Baltimore, has been an adventure. The latest stop on his journey is China, where he is part of the coaching staff that is training a group of Chinese university students for an international football tournament in May. The Chinese will be playing their first international tournament in American football -- which they call “olive ball” in...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.