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By Waltrina Stovall and Waltrina Stovall,Universal Press Syndicate | January 16, 1991
You should never go to a chili cook-off without Matt Martinez's Five Ingredient Mix.Mr. Martinez, the owner-chef of Matt's Rancho Martinez outside of Dallas, says the mix is also a "super scratch recipe" that can flavor 30 or so other dishes, including tamales, blackened chicken and fish, pork and chicken fajitas, and a casserole of pork and cabbage with rice.For chili, he says, the mix is "real forgiving. If you use too much, it won't hurt; if you under-measure a little, it will still taste good."
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
I gather that there is some brouhaha today about a fast-food chain that serves mediocre fried chicken. (The One True Fried Chicken was made in an iron skillet by my mother and grandmother, and anything else is a pale and shoddy imitation.) Really, if you are going to eat fast food, Cincinnati chili is a far more satisfactory dish. Unfortunately, Skyline has no outlets in Baltimore, but I have a recipe for one variant of Cincinnati chili from the late Bob Johnson, my first news editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer , and I am willing to impart the secret to you. But first, a caution.
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By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | June 12, 1991
Dennis Kincaid, of College Park, was Saturday's winner of the Maryland State Chili Competition at Oregon Ridge. There were 45 entries.The contest was sponsored by the Mason Dixon Chili Pod. For more chili information call 557-8549.Winning Chili2 tablespoons of bacon grease1 1/2 large onions, sliced4 fresh jalapeno peppers with seeds, chopped2 1/2 pounds bottom round beef, cut in 1/2 -inch cubes, with fat and grizzle removed2 pounds ground pork1 15-ounce can tomato sauce1 can beef bouillon2 large cloves garlic, chopped fine4 cans Ortega or Old El Paso long grain chilies, chopped2 tablespoons cumin, divided2 tablespoons cayenne pepper2 tablespoons hot chili powder6 tablespoons mild chili powder or Texas chili powderIn large kettle, melt bacon grease, add onions and chopped jalapeno peppers, cook until onions are soft.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
It's supposedly good for you to eat pork or cabbage or black-eyed peas at New Year's, and for my last post of the year I offer you this recipe for “caviar” made with black-eyed peas. It's a variant of a recipe for the 1970s in a Time-Life book that The Sun published in 2000. It has been quite serviceable for the holiday in our house. Here are a couple of things to consider. Dried black-eyed peas are better than canned, because you can have more control over whether they get mushy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
Grilled Corn, Mexican Style 4 ears corn 1 C sour cream 1 C grated cheese (parmesean, asiago, or romano) Chili powder Sea Salt Black Pepper Keeping the husks on helps the corn retain its moisture during cooking. Carefully peel back the husks, leaving them intact. Remove the corn silk and rinse the corn free of debris. Dry. Slather the corn with butter, and fold the husks back up to cover the corn. Place on grill, turning occasionally. Cook for about 20-30 minutes.
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By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
CHILI LOVERS FROM all over Maryland will gather Saturday at Oregon Ridge to judge their favorite food. The Maryland State Chili Competition, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., is sponsored by the Mason Dixon Chili Pod.Procceeds will go to benefit the Baltimore Ronald McDonald house. Admission for adults is $3, senior citizens $2 and children under 12 get in free. The public can taste the competing chilis for 25 cents a cup.For more information call 557-8549.Here is last year's winning recipe from Tanya Galat.
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By RENEE ENNA | August 23, 2006
Rubs can rub a lazy cook the right way. There usually are ample ingredients in the pantry (after all, how much ground red pepper or cumin can a person go through in a decade?) and they add plenty of zip to meat and seafood. Here we're adding a rub to quick-cooking steak kebabs. You can tailor the rub to accommodate your heat quotient; use less of the chili and ground red pepper (or none at all) if you prefer a tamer kebab. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
FEATURES
April 21, 1991
Are you a typical consumer? Betty Crocker recently held a Food Issues Forum that revealed the following:*Three-fourths of all consumers in a recent survey considered themselves experienced cooks, with only 4 percent calling themselves gourmet cooks.*One out of two American consumers would continue buying preferred brand names during a recession; about one out of four would switch to a less expensive product.*The top 10 items in pantries are ketchup, mustard, vegetable oil, cinnamon, margarine, spaghetti, seasoned salt, chili powder, potatoes and soy sauce.
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By Seattle Times | January 15, 1992
This low fat casserole has a Mexican flavor. It takes about 20 minutes to prepare.Turkey-Tortilla Casserole1 teaspoon olive oil1 small onion, peeled and minced2 medium cloves garlic, peeled and minced1 pound ground turkey2 teaspoons chili powder1/2 teaspoon ground cumin1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano, crushed1 tablespoon vinegar1 15-ounce can black beans, drained, rinsed and drained again1 16-ounce jar mild or medium-hot salsa3/4 cup...
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By Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | March 27, 1991
Extra beans and tomatoes can turn meaty chili into a pot richer in flavor, vitamins, minerals and water-soluble fiber, while cutting the percentage of fat at the same time. This recipe makes a lot, so freeze some for an easy meal another day. To reheat, add a little a water and warm in your microwave oven or on your range-top.Bowl-of-Red Chili1 pound lean ground beef2 large onions, chopped2 15 1/2 -ounce cans red kidney beans2 15 1/2 -ounce cans dark red kidney beans1 28-ounce can peeled Italian-style tomatoes, cut up1 14 1/2 -ounce can stewed tomatoes2 4-ounce cans diced green chili peppers1/4 cup chili powder1 teaspoon garlic powder1 teaspoon dried oregano, crushed1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper (optional)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Since the Ravens are playing in Cincinnati this weekend, there won't be a proper chance to tailgate at M&T Bank Stadium. If you're planning on celebrating at home, one-pot recipes are often the best option: They don't take too much time to make and serve, and can satisfy a group of hungry fans. Enter the humble bowl of chili - a signature dish for many home cooks. This recipe has meat and beans, and a touch of spice - but not enough to cause much trouble. It's made in three stages: Brown the meat; cook the vegetables; and combine everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
Grilled Corn, Mexican Style 4 ears corn 1 C sour cream 1 C grated cheese (parmesean, asiago, or romano) Chili powder Sea Salt Black Pepper Keeping the husks on helps the corn retain its moisture during cooking. Carefully peel back the husks, leaving them intact. Remove the corn silk and rinse the corn free of debris. Dry. Slather the corn with butter, and fold the husks back up to cover the corn. Place on grill, turning occasionally. Cook for about 20-30 minutes.
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By Carole Kotkin and Carole Kotkin,McClatchy-Tribune | July 7, 2007
When my cooking students complain that they can't make a good pot of rice, I suggest pilaf. Simple and practically foolproof, it's a delicious and versatile side dish. In a perfect pilaf, the grains of rice are firm and separate, not mushy and stuck together, and the texture is light and fluffy. Briefly sauteing the raw rice gives the grains a toasty flavor and helps to separate them. The rice will lose its translucency, and the starches on the outside will firm up and absorb the liquid slowly.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 16, 2006
My thirtysomething son called the other day -- not, as usual, to give me an update on the latest accomplishments of his young children, but rather to tell me about some delicious ribs he and his wife had sampled. A talented cook, he had tasted some outstanding spareribs at a recent party, and tried unsuccessfully to figure out the flavorings. Finally, he had asked the host, Regina Moyer, how the scrumptious pork was prepared. "I call them the Cs," she said, explaining that many of the ingredients used in the recipe begin with the letter "C."
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA | August 23, 2006
Rubs can rub a lazy cook the right way. There usually are ample ingredients in the pantry (after all, how much ground red pepper or cumin can a person go through in a decade?) and they add plenty of zip to meat and seafood. Here we're adding a rub to quick-cooking steak kebabs. You can tailor the rub to accommodate your heat quotient; use less of the chili and ground red pepper (or none at all) if you prefer a tamer kebab. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 3, 2005
Because I'm not a big fan of mussels, the shellfish rarely show up on my menu at home. But this garlicky dish is an exception. It's delicious and quick. It is always best to consume mussels the same day you purchase them. Small black mussels work best for this recipe, and you can substitute small clams if mussels are not your thing. Purge them quickly by immersing in cold water to expel any sand. Then, quickly scrub each mussel clean with a brush and cut off any beard (hairlike filaments attached to the shell)
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 15, 1993
Several days ago, our son Michael, who works in Boston, called with an ourgent culinary request. Everyone in his office, it seems, was in a holiday spirit and had been bringing homemade sweets and savories to work during the past week. There was an air of conviviality at lunch and at breaks when people enjoyed sampling these treats.Mike wanted to make a contribution, too, but because of his hectic schedule, he did not have much free time for marketing or vTC cooking. He asked if I could suggest an easy recipe that could be made in less than an hour.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 30, 2005
March Madness - we refer to the college basketball tournament, not the crazy weather - means a nonstop parade of games. So what's in order is a quick and hearty dish that lets fans make a fast break to the TV. This chili has its roots in the University of Illinois (home of the top-ranked Fighting Illini) and has traveled the path of many recipes: A friend (and Illinois alumus) got it from his college roommate, who got it from his mother, who may or may not have clipped it from a newspaper.
NEWS
By Tanya Fritz and Tanya Fritz,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 1, 2005
Taco Salad Night," the meal that I grew up looking forward to once a week, is a quick and easy way to get nutritious food on the table fast. It also allows the kids to have fun creating their own plates. My mom used to put each ingredient in its own bowl, and we would make our own dinners choosing from bowls we searched for while spinning the Lazy Susan. Tips To core a head of lettuce, pound the base of the core against the sink or countertop once or twice until you feel it loosen. The core will pull out easily.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 30, 2005
March Madness - we refer to the college basketball tournament, not the crazy weather - means a nonstop parade of games. So what's in order is a quick and hearty dish that lets fans make a fast break to the TV. This chili has its roots in the University of Illinois (home of the top-ranked Fighting Illini) and has traveled the path of many recipes: A friend (and Illinois alumus) got it from his college roommate, who got it from his mother, who may or may not have clipped it from a newspaper.
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