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NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
Alex Twery said he reads nearly every day after school. He said he can get through about 50 pages a day - especially if it is a book with lots of action. "It's fun," he said. "You can just think about stuff, and it passes the time." Alex, 8, a third-grader at Sandymount Elementary School, thinks he will have no problem reading four books over the next two months as part of a reading incentive program. His reward will be a free ticket to a Frederick Keys baseball game, if he reaches his goal.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
Patricia S. Ballentine, a preschool teacher who introduced her students to poetry, reading and art, died of an aortic tear Thursday at a hospital in Atlanta. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 65. Mrs. Ballentine was returning to her home from a vacation in Naples, Fla., when she was stricken at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, said a daughter, Laura Ballentine Bass of Atlanta. Patricia Scott was born in Bellefonte, Pa., and raised in Westfield, N.J. She was a 1959 graduate of Westfield High School and earned her bachelor's degree in fine arts in 1963 from Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio.
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FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2000
Amid the convoluted daytime landscape of Pokemon, "All My Children" and Rosie, a new TV entry arrives today with a simple purpose: Teach children to read. PBS' "Between the Lions" delivers a frenetic mix of puppets, live action, animation and music that takes on the task of combating illiteracy with full fervor. This half-hour series is packed with educational pieces that lock together like the most intricate of puzzles. " `Between the Lions' is for graduates of `Sesame Street,' for those kids who have gone past very beginning concepts," says its creative director, Christopher Cerf.
NEWS
By KRISTI FUNDERBURK and KRISTI FUNDERBURK,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
Audrey Sapirstein gazed admiringly at the new ring she had just placed on her finger. Standing outside the castle faM-gade of the Towson Library's children's reading area Monday morning, she relished the initial prize she earned through the library's Summer Reading Club. After pre-registering for the program last week, the 9-year-old Mount Washington resident got busy on the first of four tasks she must complete this summer. The first objective included reading a newspaper, reading with a friend or pet and reading about a mystery, which is in line with the theme of this year's program, "Clue into Reading."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 28, 1996
WYANDOTTE, Mich. -- President Clinton unveiled a $2.75 billion children's literacy initiative yesterday, telling an audience here that only those who read can "build the future of their dreams."Citing evidence showing that children who can't read by the third grade are unlikely to graduate from high school, the president left his campaign train to make his announcement at a public school library where he was flanked by dozens of smiling school children."We know that without reading, the history books are closed, the Internet is turned off, the promise of America is much harder to reach," the president said.
NEWS
By Tom Gutting and Tom Gutting,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2000
Elaine Cole, a single mother of four who lives in Baltimore, worries about her 8-year-old son, Sir'Dionte, because he doesn't like to read. But Cole works full time and can't help her youngest child with his homework as much as she would like. That's why she jumped at the chance to enroll Sir'Dionte, 10-year-old Sir'Mourtinay and 13-year-old Myeisha in the Maryland Humanities Council's "Family Matters" reading program. Every Tuesday through this week, the Coles and several other west-side families have gathered at the Walbrook branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library to discuss important themes.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 18, 1999
Parents who want to encourage their children to spend more time reading and less time watching television might want to tune in to the Fifth National TV-Turnoff Week, which begins Thursday.For seven days through April 28, an estimated 6 million people are expected to voluntarily abstain from television viewing, according to the program's sponsor, TV-Free America.Some might mark their participation by hiding their remotes, hanging "No TV" flags outdoors, or, the nonprofit organization suggests, stretching crime scene tape across their television screens.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 4, 1998
MOSCOW -- The Russian language is so emphatically phonetic that if you ask someone to spell his name, he'll pronounce it slowly and distinctly. Ask again -- how do you spell it? -- and he'll pronounce it again, perhaps shouting this time because, if you haven't understood, you're obviously hard of hearing.Russian words sound just like they're spelled. While English afflicts its speakers with rule-breaking words like "would" and "might," Russian follows its rules so devoutly that words like "obrushivshuyusya" (it means collapsed)
NEWS
March 12, 2000
Tips to Success The Sun's readers tell their success stories and offer tips on encouraging children to read. Kitchen helpers "My kids help me with dinner by reading the recipe and directions for the meal I prepare. This also helped them to understand fractions by having them reduce or increase ingredients along with using measuring spoons and cups." -- Mari Shoebotham Columbia Getting into the story "I used to insert my child's first name into stories so they could more readily visualize the actions of the character.
NEWS
March 21, 1999
Reading is languageOur language is composed of words. Words, gestures, pictures are the symbols/tools used to communicate our ideas and thoughts to others. Reading involves the use and understanding of these tools/symbols. Mastering these skills is a lifelong process. There is no magic age when children suddenly begin to read. And there is no magic formula. For most children, it happens over a period of time. And it is not a neat, tidy process. By providing a stimulating and trust-filled environment, rich with words and the flow of ideas, by providing the basic skills necessary to decipher the code and use language, parents and teachers help children learn to read.
NEWS
By KATIE MARTIN and KATIE MARTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
Alex Twery said he reads nearly every day after school. He said he can get through about 50 pages a day - especially if it is a book with lots of action. "It's fun," he said. "You can just think about stuff, and it passes the time." Alex, 8, a third-grader at Sandymount Elementary School, thinks he will have no problem reading four books over the next two months as part of a reading incentive program. His reward will be a free ticket to a Frederick Keys baseball game, if he reaches his goal.
NEWS
October 1, 2003
Public may comment on schools' budget at hearing Oct. 7 The public will have an opportunity to comment on the fiscal 2005 capital budget and the fiscal 2006-2010 capital improvement program at a public hearing of the Howard County Board of Education at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 7 in the boardroom at the Department of Education, 10910 Route 108, Ellicott City. Those who want to testify are asked to limit the presentation to three minutes and provide 15 written copies of the testimony at the time of the hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | March 27, 2003
Reading is educational. It's a way to pass free time. It's an alternative to television. It pleases teachers and parents. Oh - and let's not forget - reading is also fun. To celebrate National Library Week (April 6-12), the Mount Airy branch of the Carroll County Library invites kids of all ages to drop by now and check out Garfield the cat's list of the Top 10 Reasons to Read. Then, kids are encouraged to draw up their own list of Top 10 Reasons to Read and drop it off at the library's Information Desk.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 12, 2003
NEW YORK - "Reading Is Fundamental," says the bumper sticker. "If you can read this, thank a teacher," says another. Whom do you thank, or blame, if you can't read or read well? New Yorkers can thank (or blame) the new "phonics" program embraced by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and School Chancellor Joel L. Klein. It is not a true phonics program, but a witch's brew of small amounts of phonics and heaping doses of the failed "whole language" approach that is increasingly being abandoned in school districts across the country.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
AMHERST, Mass. - Two-year-old twins Moira and Mia McDonald, in matching bob haircuts and red turtlenecks, zip across the granite floor among the framed pictures of old friends, stopping at familiar faces and exclaiming, "Look what I found!" The very hungry caterpillar and the grouchy ladybug watch as the tots speed past. But it's the very greedy python that gets the girls wriggling, giggling and "ssssssssing" in front of his green curled body fashioned from brightly colored tissue paper.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
THERE ARE said to be no guarantees in life, but here's an outfit that guarantees "100 percent literacy" among some of the nation's hardest-to-teach youngsters, so sure is it that "we now have the science and the system that can eradicate illiteracy." That's a quote from the promotional literature of Dallas-based Voyager Universal Literacy System, founded in 1994 by a group of educators and business leaders. The program is aimed at urban schools, and the for-profit company guarantees that all children who are "capable" of reading - that's 95 percent of them - will be doing so at grade level by age 9, or Voyager will continue working with them at company expense until they become competent readers.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2001
The director stood in front of the classroom, twirling a green plastic noisemaker over her head. As it whirred, the 7- and 8-year-olds fell silent. "Lights! Camera! Action!" the director called. Then the half-dozen pint-sized actors at the front of the class re-enacted "Arrow to the Sun," a Pueblo Indian folktale about a hero's journey to give light and warmth to mankind from the Lord of the Sun. It looked like a theater class. But second-graders in art teacher Pat Cruz's class at Sandy Plains Elementary School in Dundalk weren't learning to act. The pupils were learning to read through a program called Arts Smart, which aims to raise the reading scores of youngsters who typically have done poorly on standardized tests.
NEWS
July 30, 2001
Inadequate parenting is the reason our kids have trouble reading In his column "Kids must read as soon as possible" (Opinion Commentary, July 24), Kalman Hettleman suggests five steps to help children master developmentally appropriate reading skills by first grade. They all put responsibility on the school system to solve the problem. As a teacher for more than 25 years, I suggest we consider other reasons why children are having trouble reading: * Most kids do not enjoy relaxed reading time with parents because both parents are working, tired and stressed out. * Most kids don't see their parents reading for pleasure because the parents are too busy.
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