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By Carol Bowers and Carol Bowers,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
Pushing for approval of nearly $78.6 million worth of construction, the county's acting school superintendent painted a bleak picture for the Board of Education last night."
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NEWS
By Edwin C. Darden | December 19, 2007
This month, a national research organization examining reforms at four Maryland school systems released a report that was both disappointing and frustratingly predictable. The Washington-based Center on Education Policy determined that restructuring efforts as called for under the federal No Child Left Behind law were having little impact on failing schools. Reform efforts such as Maryland's often focus exclusively on making teachers and administrators work harder and smarter during the school day. While well-meaning, that approach is seldom enough.
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NEWS
By THOMAS V. DIBACCO | November 28, 1993
Education-bashing has become so widespread these days that a foreign visitor to the United States might believe this land of the free to be also the home of young blockheads.Department of Education officials want better teaching as they lament the low reading scores of elementary-schoolers; state governors want more federal money for their schools; and many parents want to be able to choose their children's schools instead of having them assigned by their local school boards.Historians recognize that each generation of Americans has lamented the educational state of its offspring.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | October 17, 2006
There are dads whose role in the education of their children ends at the altar - when they marry the women they expect to handle all that stuff. And there are dads whose role in the education of their children ends at conception - absent fathers whose own memories of school may be so negative that nothing could get them in the schoolhouse door again. And then there are the dads who are playing basketball Thursday nights in Annapolis, lured into their children's schools with the promise of a little exercise and a little fun. Rhonda Pindell-Charles, who has been, along with her family, a quiet force in the African-American community in Annapolis for generations, has started a basketball league for the fathers of children in the public school system.
NEWS
By Bernard Guyer | July 31, 2003
A RECENT simulated biological attack on the Inner Harbor tested Baltimore's hospitals and emergency personnel response, but police, fire, medical and public health officials aren't the only ones who need to be prepared. We should also be thinking about protecting our children and schools. In a real crisis, many of Baltimore's parents would have been concerned, first and foremost, for the safety of their children. At the first news of the event, parents would jam the phone lines to their children's schools; few would actually be able to get through.
NEWS
By Nancy S. Grasmick | November 19, 1991
A YEAR AGO, Maryland published its first report card on schools. Last Tuesday, the state released its second report, showing that schools have made progress toward achieving rigorous standards. Last year's report was a significant achievement for the state, marking the first time that a state and all of its school systems published consistent information on the condition of education.This year, the state report looked at its progress over the past year and added some new information on school performance.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
A rule that forbids nonprofessional relationships between students and school staff members has one major flaw, a group of parents told the Carroll County Board of Education yesterday. It denies them an absolute right to be informed of any accusation involving their children.The parents' concern grew from a series of incidents in 1995 at Liberty High School. Their remarks caught school officials off guard as they reviewed proposed changes to the policy.Although the parents identified themselves at the meeting, they asked that their names not be used to protect their daughters' privacy.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1997
Maryland's public school students will be taking another step into the computer age as federal and state officials are expected to announce today plans for helping parents get more involved with their children's schools through the World Wide Web.Starting this fall, parents in Maryland should be able to look up their child's school lunch menu on the Internet, check on after-school activities and give feedback to school officials through a network of customized...
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | October 17, 2006
There are dads whose role in the education of their children ends at the altar - when they marry the women they expect to handle all that stuff. And there are dads whose role in the education of their children ends at conception - absent fathers whose own memories of school may be so negative that nothing could get them in the schoolhouse door again. And then there are the dads who are playing basketball Thursday nights in Annapolis, lured into their children's schools with the promise of a little exercise and a little fun. Rhonda Pindell-Charles, who has been, along with her family, a quiet force in the African-American community in Annapolis for generations, has started a basketball league for the fathers of children in the public school system.
NEWS
By Stephen C. Tracy | June 27, 1991
PRESIDENT Bush's decision to move education to the top of his domestic agenda underscores two increasingly urgent realities. First, the nation is dissatisfied with the performance of its public schools. And second, unless schools improve dramatically, the United States will have disqualified itself from the global economy of the 21st century.The president's plan would provide parents with public funds to educate their children at the public or private schools of their choice. I have opposed ideas like this for most of my 20 years in public education.
NEWS
By Bernard Guyer | July 31, 2003
A RECENT simulated biological attack on the Inner Harbor tested Baltimore's hospitals and emergency personnel response, but police, fire, medical and public health officials aren't the only ones who need to be prepared. We should also be thinking about protecting our children and schools. In a real crisis, many of Baltimore's parents would have been concerned, first and foremost, for the safety of their children. At the first news of the event, parents would jam the phone lines to their children's schools; few would actually be able to get through.
NEWS
By Joy Green and Joy Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 2001
At Agape House in Southwest Baltimore, summer camp is over, the games are finished and the field trips done. But for children at area elementary schools, the fun that accompanies learning will continue at an after-school reading program run by the Carrollton Avenue organization. Agape House, a faith-based community outreach organization, offers the reading program to children younger than 6 in conjunction with the Southwestern Consortium of Baltimore's Success By 6, a public-private partnership that works to prepare young children for school.
NEWS
By Marian Morton and Marian Morton,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2001
Howard County Schools Superintendent John R. O'Rourke presented a prioritized list of potential budget cuts to the Howard County Board of Education last night, repeatedly declaring that he was not enthusiastic about scaling back the school system's budget. "I don't want anyone to think that any of these items is a simple cut or an easy cut," O'Rourke said. "I will take full responsibility for this list and the priorities that are associated with this list." The proposed cuts, necessary to compensate for a $5 million gap between County Executive James N. Robey's proposed budget for 2002 and the amount requested by school officials, total about $6.2 million.
NEWS
By Marian Morton and Marian Morton,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2001
The Howard County Board of Education is expected to vote on guidelines tonight that would firmly close the door on open enrollment in the county's public schools in all but a handful of specific circumstances. The board voted at its March 20 meeting to extend a moratorium on open enrollment implemented last year that ended the county's policy of open enrollment in its public schools. Before the moratorium, parents could effectively hand-pick their children's schools as long as they could provide transportation to schools outside their districts and if they chose schools that were below capacity.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | October 22, 2000
On the first day of kindergarten, orientation time for us nervous, novice parents, my wife and I are handed a thick envelope. No explanation is given. Our teacher doesn't have to bother. Little did we realize -- first-timers that we are -- but we've just been given an offer we can't refuse. Inside are gift wrap order forms. The PTA wants us to sell, sell, sell. As Dante might say, "lasciate ogni speranza voi ch'entrate" -- abandon all hope ye who enter here. Within days I'm on the phone with my father, hopeful that he will spare me from the torture of knocking on neighbors' doors or strong-arming acquaintances: How many rolls of wrapping paper, Grandpa?
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 4, 2000
IF YOUR CHILDREN attend school in Glen Burnie, chances are good that you'll meet Janet Pogar. The mother of six is a triple threat - in parent-teacher organizations, that is. Pogar is president of the PTA at Richard Henry Lee Elementary. And Corkran Middle. And Glen Burnie High. And as if her calendar is not full enough, she finds time to coordinate volunteers at the elementary school, plan school dances and skate parties, work as a guest reader for children, play chaperon on field trips and organize fund-raisers for the middle school band.
NEWS
By Marian Morton and Marian Morton,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2001
The Howard County Board of Education is expected to vote on guidelines tonight that would firmly close the door on open enrollment in the county's public schools in all but a handful of specific circumstances. The board voted at its March 20 meeting to extend a moratorium on open enrollment implemented last year that ended the county's policy of open enrollment in its public schools. Before the moratorium, parents could effectively hand-pick their children's schools as long as they could provide transportation to schools outside their districts and if they chose schools that were below capacity.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1996
In their standard stump speeches, there is little to distinguish the five candidates in the primary election race for a seat on the Howard County school board.Like national political candidates who dwell on tried-and-true but hollow themes, the school board contenders frequently return to broad statements about the need for academic achievement, student discipline, school system accountability and school board fiscal responsibility.But there are great differences among the candidates -- in their backgrounds, personalities and knowledge of the system.
NEWS
By Suzanne Fields | November 1, 1999
AMERICAN children who aren't exactly 8 o'clock scholars often rate themselves as better students than they really are. They don't know enough to know what they don't know.It now turns out that many parents do that, too. In a study of several hundred mothers from the United States, Japan and China about the school performance of their children in the fifth grade, more than half of the American mothers announced that they were "very satisfied" with their children's schoolwork.But not true in Asia.
NEWS
October 8, 1999
Inadequate funding drives parents to raise funds for schoolsThe Sun's article "PTAs may contribute to school disparities" (Sept. 20) explained a great deal about fund-raising efforts by local PTAs. But it never answered the key question: Why do local PTAs try to raise so much money?Sure, individuals quoted in the article said they wanted to improve their children's schools, but why is this necessary? Because the schools in Maryland (and Harford County in particular) are grossly underfunded.
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