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By Justin Fenton | March 3, 2010
A 2-month-old boy was in critical condition at a Washington hospital Tuesday with skull fractures after his 19-year-old father hit him while the infant was in his mother's arms, police said. Detective Kevin Hagan, a Baltimore police spokesman, confirmed that police were called for a domestic complaint about 11:10 p.m. Monday at the boy's home in the 2900 block of Spellman Road in Cherry Hill. According to charging documents, Daryl Taylor broke through the bathroom door and struck the mother and baby with a closed fist after the mother locked herself and the child inside.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton | March 3, 2010
A 2-month-old boy was in critical condition at a Washington hospital Tuesday with skull fractures after his 19-year-old father hit him while the infant was in his mother's arms, police said. Detective Kevin Hagan, a Baltimore police spokesman, confirmed that police were called for a domestic complaint about 11:10 p.m. Monday at the boy's home in the 2900 block of Spellman Road in Cherry Hill. According to charging documents, Daryl Taylor broke through the bathroom door and struck the mother and baby with a closed fist after the mother locked herself and the child inside.
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FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Research shows that music therapy has a profound impact on premature infants. We asked Clarissa Karlsson, a board-certified music therapist at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., to explain the benefits. How does music therapy benefit preemies? Music therapy can positively affect premature infants' physiological stability, increase opportunities for bonding and attachment with caregivers, and provide appropriate developmental stimulation. Babies born before term are not as neurologically mature or physiologically stable as full-term babies.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 20, 2012
Maryland hospitals are buying more food locally, according to a new analysis. Forty hospitals in Maryland, the District of Columbia, and Northern Virginia are now purchasing locally grown fruits and vegetables regularly during the growing season and nine are consistently purchasing meat or poultry produced by local farmers who use sustainable agricultural practices, according to Maryland Hospitals for a Healthy Environment. “Incorporating more local and sustainable foods requires a modification of the traditional purchasing practices of hospitals,” said Louise Mitchell, the organization's sustainable foods program manager.“Leading hospitals in this region deserve a lot of credit for their persistence, determination and strategic thinking on how to make it work.” The hospitals spent nearly $30,000 on local foods in one week during the Buy Local Challenge last July, twice the amount purchased during the same week in 2010 and translating to at least $60,000 of positive impact on the local economy.  Highest purchases for the week included Union Hospital of Cecil County at $5,482, Meritus Medical Center at $2,187 and Civista Medical Center at $1,841.
NEWS
By Lane Page | April 1, 2014
Maria Trent lived in the Columbia neighborhood of Running Brook during the early 1970s while her dad worked on a doctorate at the University of Maryland, College Park, and her mom taught at Waterloo Elementary. She was just 3 years old when her family moved back to North Carolina, but she was destined to return to Howard County - after an extended academic detour took her from undergrad at Yale to University of North Carolina Medical School, to a pediatric residency at Children's National Medical Center in D.C. and earning a master's degree in public health from Harvard.
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