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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1994
He doesn't have a college education, but he runs the country's largest after-school tutoring company. He's single and childless, but he's heading the effort to build the new, $30 million children's museum in downtown Baltimore."
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2011
Thousands of children, from toddlers to 12-year-olds, did something yesterday that seems almost novel in the age of computers and digital games: They went outside and played. In the chilly air of the first Sunday of October, Rash Field at Baltimore's Inner Harbor became a sprawling playground. Over six hours, boys and girls skipped rope, jumped rope, hula-hooped, played with sticks and created works of sidewalk art with colorful chalk. They chased big, soapy bubbles created by a clown on stilts.
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NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | December 23, 1992
Baltimore officials are proposing to buy The Brokerage, a long-troubled office and retail complex, for $5 million and to move the Cloisters Children's Museum there from its city-owned site in Baltimore County.The Board of Estimates today will consider the city's purchase of The Brokerage -- the perennially ailing development on Market Place near the Inner Harbor -- with money from the sale of bonds previously approved by voters for parking facilities. Integral to redevelopment of the 3-acre complex is the creation of a new Baltimore Children's Museum on the site, according to documents submitted to the board by the Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
With drums, bells and other instruments, children were raising the roof Sunday at Port Discovery in Baltimore, as part of the 10th annual "I Have A Dream Weekend" festivities honoring the birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. On Day 2 of the three-day celebration, scores of children sat in a large studio of the children's museum, beating djembe West African drums while others shook cowbells and whacked tambourines. They tried to keep up with Jonathan Murray, drum circle facilitator, and his partner, Daveed Korup, who built the African rhythms to a crescendo as loud as an Eastern Shore summer thunderstorm.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | August 26, 1991
A hoard of coins and bank notes lay unnoticed for years in a safe at the Cloisters, the hilltop castle in Brooklandville that became a Baltimore-owned children's museum.Now, the city expects the find to pay off. Christie's, a New York auction house, has put a high value on the collection and will sell it Sept. 13 to benefit the museum."I think $350,000 is a perfectly reasonable expectation," said James Lamb, director of Christie's coin department. "Perhaps we can come up with a bit more."The old U.S. coins and notes were found in a safe at the Cloisters by city employees during the conversion of the mansion into a museum in 1977, five years after its owner's death.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 7, 1994
If this is lacrosse season, it must be spring.The White House will put an official on the Whitewater case to make sure that no one there is tampering with the investigation.A vigorous little trade war with Japan should rally people behind the president.If NationsBank says there is going to be a Children's Museum in the Brokerage, there is going to be one.
NEWS
December 6, 1998
THE COUNTDOWN is on to the Dec. 29 public opening of Port Discovery, Baltimore's new children's museum. As by-invitation-only pre-opening events begin Tuesday, no one is watching the project more closely than the real estate community.It is wondering whether the $32 million complex can make a big splash at a site where other entertainment and retail concepts failed.Port Discovery's exhibits have to succeed on their own, of course. But the Baltimore Development Corp. strengthened the museum's long-term chances recently by selecting the Cordish Co. to revitalize the Brokerage, an adjoining building that flopped as a retail and nightclub venue.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2004
NEXT WEEK IN LIVE This year's holiday movie season gives viewers more hope and less to cry about ... Checking out the fresh produce at four markets just north of the Maryland line. COMING UP The suit-wearing, pump-purchasing class in Washington does have some creativity in its midst after all. It'll be displayed in spades this week when Artomatic opens. The annual event is a kind of Trading Spaces for artists. A horde of them (more than 1,000) take over an underused office building - this time the site of the old National Children's Museum - and paint it, install art in it and generally turn it into their own studio/fun house.
TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross | June 28, 2009
The Smoke City has come a long way since its origins as the industrial giant of the world. Trying to reverse a hazy legacy that led writer James Parton in 1868 to describe it as "hell with the lid taken off," Pittsburgh has joined the green, eco-friendly movement. The city hosts visitors in the world's largest green-certified convention center, where lights are recycled and water is reclaimed. It's also known for outdoor retreats, historical sites, museums, art galleries and zoos. 1 Go play at the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1997
Port Discovery, the $29 million downtown Baltimore children's museum expected to open next year, got a boost yesterday when the state Board of Public Works approved a $1.5 million grant for development and design.The grant brings to more than $14 million the amount raised toward the cost of the museum, including corporate donations and state and city investments totaling more than $6.5 million.Rouse Co. is development manager and Walt Disney Imagineering, the corporate giant's design arm, is designing and building the high-tech exhibits.
TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross | June 28, 2009
The Smoke City has come a long way since its origins as the industrial giant of the world. Trying to reverse a hazy legacy that led writer James Parton in 1868 to describe it as "hell with the lid taken off," Pittsburgh has joined the green, eco-friendly movement. The city hosts visitors in the world's largest green-certified convention center, where lights are recycled and water is reclaimed. It's also known for outdoor retreats, historical sites, museums, art galleries and zoos. 1 Go play at the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Jacques Kelly and Melissa Harris and Jacques Kelly,melissa.harris@baltsun.com and jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
Bryan and Missy Meyers planned their vacation to Northern Virginia around a trip to Baltimore's Port Discovery - a favorite spot of their young daughters before the family moved to Reno, Nev. With a late flight Tuesday, the Meyers family arrived at 11:30 a.m. only to learn that the children's museum would close in an hour and a half. The reason: Lots of children and no water pressure make for very messy bathrooms. And after seeing the toilets brimming with discolored, soppy toilet paper, Missy Meyers conceded the point.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | February 18, 2008
From an early age, kids are fascinated by water. A new exhibit at Port Discovery Children's Museum capitalizes on that fascination. Wonders of Water is the name of the $400,000 exhibit, the first permanent one added to the museum since it opened in December 1998. The new aquatic playground on the museum's third level lets kids interact with water in a variety of ways. They can pump it, squirt it, make giant bubbles with it, play music with it, float boats on it -- just about anything short of bathing in it. And that appeals to kids' natural interest in all things liquid.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | December 30, 2005
Nail biting, keeping a messy desk and hitting a little brother were among the bad habits written on strips of paper, then stuffed into an effigy of an old man on Wednesday. Girls ages six to 11 participating in New Year's Around the World at the Chesapeake Children's Museum in Annapolis then carried the old man, stuffed with their faults and pieces of cloth, as though they were taking him to the market to light on fire, as is a tradition in Ecuador. "Now you don't have to think about your faults anymore," said Renee Spears, a museum volunteer.
NEWS
October 1, 2005
Harford County: Pylesville North Harford school water tests clean The water at North Harford Middle School came back clean in its first test since showing traces of fecal coliform earlier this month. Twelve samples were taken from the Pylesville school's water, which has been shut off since a pipe was broken during construction in the summer. A spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment said 12 more samples were to be taken yesterday, with the results coming in over the weekend.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
Financially struggling Port Discovery received debt relief yesterday from city officials who agreed to allow the downtown children's museum to delay repaying $4 million in loans that were coming due in December. The city's five-member Board of Estimates unanimously approved a request from the Baltimore Development Corp. to modify its loan agreement with Port Discovery's nonprofit operating company. The deal allows the Baltimore Children's Museum Inc. to repay the interest-free loans by Dec. 31, 2009, instead of at the end of this year, allowing its executives time to continue on a newly implemented business plan aimed at improving Port Discovery's operations.
NEWS
December 30, 1993
If you don't like the weather in Baltimore, goes the old adage, stick around a few minutes, it'll change. Now virtually the same could be said for museums around the Inner Harbor: Stick around. Fairly soon, a new one will be proposed.The most recent plans unveiled call for a $15 million state-run museum to celebrate African-American history and culture in Maryland. The proposed site is now a parking lot in Little Italy.If it comes to fruition, this attraction won't lack for company. Just a few blocks down President Street, one of the nation's earliest railroad depots is being renovated into a Civil War-era transportation exhibit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
If you have a kid who loves music, Port Discovery has just the exhibit for your little fan. Opening Saturday and running through Jan. 9 at the downtown children's museum is Making America's Music: Rhythm, Roots and Rhyme, a new traveling exhibit celebrating the history, diversity and joy of American music. The exhibit, created by the Boston Children's Museum and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, promotes an appreciation of music by kids and encourages them to participate in music-making, says Michelle Winner, director of marketing at Port Discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2004
NEXT WEEK IN LIVE This year's holiday movie season gives viewers more hope and less to cry about ... Checking out the fresh produce at four markets just north of the Maryland line. COMING UP The suit-wearing, pump-purchasing class in Washington does have some creativity in its midst after all. It'll be displayed in spades this week when Artomatic opens. The annual event is a kind of Trading Spaces for artists. A horde of them (more than 1,000) take over an underused office building - this time the site of the old National Children's Museum - and paint it, install art in it and generally turn it into their own studio/fun house.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
If you have a kid who loves music, Port Discovery has just the exhibit for your little fan. Opening Saturday and running through Jan. 9 at the downtown children's museum is Making America's Music: Rhythm, Roots and Rhyme, a new traveling exhibit celebrating the history, diversity and joy of American music. The exhibit, created by the Boston Children's Museum and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, promotes an appreciation of music by kids and encourages them to participate in music-making, says Michelle Winner, director of marketing at Port Discovery.
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