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By Linda Shrieves and Linda Shrieves,Orlando Sentinel | January 24, 1994
Georgy Porgy might have kissed the girls and made them cry in the old days, but these days, old Georgy is a mere shadow of his former self.And he's not the only one. In "The New Adventures of Mother Goose" (Meadowbrook Press, $15), the three blind mice of nursery rhyme are now the three kind mice. And Little Miss Muffett used to be scared of spiders, but no more. Now she's bossing them around.Welcome to the Mother Goose of the '90s -- complete with revisionist verses of traditional nursery rhymes.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
CHARLOTTE'S Web it ain't, but The English Roses, Madonna's first attempt at writing a children's book, has been selling like hotcakes -- and getting some surprisingly good reviews. Yes, that Madonna, she of Sex, her previous publishing effort in 1992, she of the monumental flop Swept Away, she of the recent lip-lock with Britney Spears on an MTV awards show. The English Roses (Callaway, $19.95) is a tale with a moral: Don't judge people by appearances. A clique of four little girls ostracizes a classmate named Binah, "the most beautiful girl anyone had ever seen."
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FEATURES
March 6, 1991
Vera B. Williams, who won a 1991 Caldecott Honor for "More, More, More, Said the Baby," will be one of three authors to speak at a conference on children's literature Saturday at Loyola College.The one-day program for teachers, librarians and fans of children's books will also feature Eleanor Cameron, author of "The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet" and "The Court of the Stone Children," and Pam Conrad, whose books include "Prairie Song" and "Stonewords."The program runs from 8:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. at McManus Theater on the Loyola campus.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2003
While working the circulation desk at the east Columbia library last year, Stella Pilecki was checking out a copy of the first Harry Potter book for an adult patron. "He was middle-aged and dressed in a business suit," Pilecki recalled, "and he said, `It's for my daughter.' " As the patron worked his way through the series, he kept saying the same thing to Pilecki as he borrowed each book. When he checked out the fourth book, he finally admitted to her that he didn't have a daughter. "I know other people want to talk about children's books, but they're not sure if they can," said Pilecki, 26. When she moved to information services, she asked for approval to start a children's literature group for adults.
NEWS
September 28, 1998
Francelia Butler,85, a professor who established the Children's Literature Foundation and worked to win respect for the academic field of children's literature, died Sept. 17 in Mansfield, Conn.Pub Date: 9/28/98
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | March 17, 1999
A love for the sciences propelled author Joanna Cole into the world of children's literature. Cole, author of the popular "Magic School Bus" series, loved the book "Bugs, Insects and Such" as a child and says she once had a teacher much like her character Ms. Frizzle.Before Cole began writing books, she was an elementary school teacher, a librarian and a children's book editor. Then, she decided to combine her knowledge of children's literature with her love of science and created her first book, "Cockroaches."
NEWS
March 28, 1999
Bonnie Scott, a columnist for Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service, uses the Internet to support her children's reading. Here are some of her suggestions:I start with the Children's Literature Web guide at www.acs. ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown. Here I have found lists of Children's Book Award winners, children's best-sellers and specific resources for parents.A Web traveler's Toolkit will link you to the best children's literature sites. Forums and bulletin boards let you post questions about kids and reading.
FEATURES
October 21, 1998
The first English book for children appeared in 1744, assembled by publisher John Newbery - who also sold school textbooks and patent medicines. The popularity of "A Little Pretty Pocket Book" led to the growth of publishing for children through the rest of the 18th century. Some critics consider these early volumes to be more propaganda than literature because their real goal was to help parents in the religious and moral upbringing of their children.The idea of producing entertaining children's books has always been at war with printing books that are supposed to be instructive or inspiring.
NEWS
January 27, 2000
The Harry Potter book-selling phenomenon has brought attention to one pleasant aspect of turn-of-the-century life: A rich abundance of children's literature, books so appealing that they even captivate adults. Since J.K. Rowling's series about the young boy and his adventures at wizard school began storming the best-seller lists, the unsung heros of the book world -- children's librarians, teachers and booksellers -- have found themselves in the public spotlight. What next? parents inquire.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2003
While working the circulation desk at the east Columbia library last year, Stella Pilecki was checking out a copy of the first Harry Potter book for an adult patron. "He was middle-aged and dressed in a business suit," Pilecki recalled, "and he said, `It's for my daughter.' " As the patron worked his way through the series, he kept saying the same thing to Pilecki as he borrowed each book. When he checked out the fourth book, he finally admitted to her that he didn't have a daughter. "I know other people want to talk about children's books, but they're not sure if they can," said Pilecki, 26. When she moved to information services, she asked for approval to start a children's literature group for adults.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2003
While working the circulation desk at the east Columbia library last year, Stella Pilecki was checking out a copy of the first Harry Potter book for an adult patron. "He was middle-aged and dressed in a business suit," Pilecki recalled, "and he said, `It's for my daughter.'" As the patron worked his way through the series, he kept saying the same thing to Pilecki as he borrowed each book. When he checked out the fourth book, he finally acknowledged to her that he didn't have a daughter.
NEWS
October 14, 2001
Youngsters sought to help with annual Books For Kids Day BALTIMORE - The Baltimore Reads literacy organization once again is putting together a group of young people ages 8 to 12 to help with its annual Books For Kids Day event, which in the spring collected more than 50,000 books to distribute to low-income families throughout the area. Children who serve on the committee help oversee and judge a poster contest publicizing the event, choosing the winning design from drawings submitted by children throughout the area.
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2000
Craning their necks, dozens of children watch as the sky on the domed ceiling comes to life. Above them stars sparkle, shooting knowing winks downward on opening day of the Pratt library's new wing. "It's marvelous in here, ethereal," says Alice McGill, the local author chosen for yesterday's inaugural show at the Samuel G. and Margaret A. Gorn Performance Theater. "The stars are such a source of imagination, aren't they?" "It looks like outer space," says 8-year-old Kyree Smith, a third-grader at Cecil Elementary.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
FOR 21 YEARS -- THE blackjack number -- JoAnn Fruchtman's Children's Bookstore has defied the odds. Fruchtman never gave her store a cutesy name, never stocked it with videos, stuffed bears and music boxes. Selling primarily quality children's literature, Fruchtman survived the onslaught of superstores and online booksellers. But something was nagging, something over which she says she "fretted": those city public school teachers regularly dipping into their pockets to buy books for their kids.
NEWS
January 27, 2000
The Harry Potter book-selling phenomenon has brought attention to one pleasant aspect of turn-of-the-century life: A rich abundance of children's literature, books so appealing that they even captivate adults. Since J.K. Rowling's series about the young boy and his adventures at wizard school began storming the best-seller lists, the unsung heros of the book world -- children's librarians, teachers and booksellers -- have found themselves in the public spotlight. What next? parents inquire.
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
THE CHILDREN of Triadelphia Ridge Elementary School have been preparing for the new year by reading. In a project called Read 2000, 639 pupils -- in kindergarten through fifth grade -- read 1,417,230 pages, an average of more than 2,000 pages per child. On Friday, the school celebrated. The reading program began in September. Its goal: that each child in the school read 2,000 pages by Dec. 31. Younger children could be read to. The children recorded their page counts on monthly calendars, and parent volunteers calculated the totals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bonnie Scott and Bonnie Scott,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 22, 1998
School is out for the summer, but don't shelve the books. Summer reading pays off for parents and kids alike because there is a direct correlation between how much reading children do during the summer and their academic success in the following school year. So while the kids are putting down their textbooks, try to get them to pickup something else to read.My local libraries offer summer reading programs that are full of ideas to motivate young readers. I can also enlist my computer for additional support and inspiration.
NEWS
October 14, 2001
Youngsters sought to help with annual Books For Kids Day BALTIMORE - The Baltimore Reads literacy organization once again is putting together a group of young people ages 8 to 12 to help with its annual Books For Kids Day event, which in the spring collected more than 50,000 books to distribute to low-income families throughout the area. Children who serve on the committee help oversee and judge a poster contest publicizing the event, choosing the winning design from drawings submitted by children throughout the area.
NEWS
March 28, 1999
Bonnie Scott, a columnist for Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service, uses the Internet to support her children's reading. Here are some of her suggestions:I start with the Children's Literature Web guide at www.acs. ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown. Here I have found lists of Children's Book Award winners, children's best-sellers and specific resources for parents.A Web traveler's Toolkit will link you to the best children's literature sites. Forums and bulletin boards let you post questions about kids and reading.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | March 17, 1999
A love for the sciences propelled author Joanna Cole into the world of children's literature. Cole, author of the popular "Magic School Bus" series, loved the book "Bugs, Insects and Such" as a child and says she once had a teacher much like her character Ms. Frizzle.Before Cole began writing books, she was an elementary school teacher, a librarian and a children's book editor. Then, she decided to combine her knowledge of children's literature with her love of science and created her first book, "Cockroaches."
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