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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 4, 1993
OAKLAND, Calif. -- In what doctors are calling a medical miracle, a healthy baby boy was born yesterday to an Oakland woman who had lain brain-dead in a hospital bed for 3 1/2 months.Doctors at Highland Hospital delivered the 32-week-old infant by Caesarean-section at 12:20 p.m. yesterday, about two hours after Trisha Marshall's blood pressure dropped precipitously, threatening the baby's safety. But there were no complications during the surgery and the 4-pound, 15-ounce infant came out kicking and screaming.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Dr. Mark I. Rossberg, a pediatric anesthesiologist at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and assistant professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Thursday of prostate cancer at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 50. "Mark was a superbly talented anesthesiologist and a masterful clinician-educator, but above all he was the consummate pediatrician," said Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean of the medical faculty and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
Johns Hopkins Medicine said Tuesday that it plans to acquire a Florida children's hospital in a deal that industry experts said would bolster the prestigious Baltimore health system's visibility in the highly specialized pediatric field. The deal with All Children's Hospital & Health System of St. Petersburg, Fla., would put one of the nation's 45 standalone children's hospitals under the Hopkins banner and mark Hopkins' first acquisition outside the Baltimore-Washington region.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
Johns Hopkins Medicine said Tuesday that it plans to acquire a Florida children's hospital in a deal that industry experts said would bolster the prestigious Baltimore health system's visibility in the highly specialized pediatric field. The deal with All Children's Hospital & Health System of St. Petersburg, Fla., would put one of the nation's 45 standalone children's hospitals under the Hopkins banner and mark Hopkins' first acquisition outside the Baltimore-Washington region.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 2, 2010
John Milton McIntyre, a retired orthopedic surgeon whose operations allowed patients to regain the use of their hands, died Tuesday of pancreatic cancer at his home in the northern section of Roland Park. He was 67. He was born in Cumberland and raised in Westernport, where his father was owner and general manager of the McIntyre Bakery. He spent his summers on Deep Creek Lake, where his family had a cottage. After graduating as valedictorian of Bruce High School in 1960, he earned a degree in chemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 22, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Children who are born weighing less than about 3 pounds have more medical and behavior problems at school age than children who start out life at a normal size, a new study has found.The study, centered at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, offers one of the most complete pictures to date of what happens later in life to babies who are born so tiny that they spend their early days just struggling to survive."Children under 3 pounds are two to three times more likely to have problems" when they reach school age compared with children who weigh more than 5 1/2 pounds at birth, said Dr. Marie McCormick, a former Children's Hospital researcher now at the Harvard School of Public Health.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2004
The University of Maryland Medical Center yesterday named Jeffrey A. Rivest as its president and chief executive officer. Rivest, who has been executive vice president and chief operating officer at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, is rejoining his old boss. Edmond F. Notebaert, the chief executive of University of Maryland Medical System, UMMC's parent, headed Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for 13 years until 2000. When he takes office Nov. 1, Rivest will become the third head of UMMC in less than two years.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1995
A 6-foot-tall, 10-foot-long serpent is on its way to the Children's National Medical Center today, courtesy of the 45-member Columbia United Christian Church in East Columbia's Oakland Mills village.It's a "Peace Sculpture," crafted from toy weapons collected from 300 Howard County children as part of a project to encourage youngsters to seek more peaceful ways to play.The sculpture, made by James and Mary Opasik of Catonsville, includes water guns, toy swords and small action figures. They all were pieced together into the shape of a giant serpent.
NEWS
April 4, 1993
A 10-year-old boy remained hospitalized yesterday for injuries he suffered when he rode his bicycle into a moving car Friday in the Greens development in Westminster.City police said Marion Rouse was riding his bicycle on Glenbrook Court about 4:20 p.m. when he failed to obey a stop sign and collided with a car driven by Stuart B. Rosenzweig, 38, of Westminster.Mr. Rosenzweig was traveling south on Glenbrook Drive and approaching Glenbrook Court when the accident occurred, police said.Police also said that no charges will be filed.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1998
Troubled by large losses and a small patient count, New Children's Hospital announced yesterday that it has successfully concluded its search for a larger partner and has signed a letter of intent to join the North Arundel Health System.New Children's is licensed for 76 beds, of which 10.7 percent were occupied on an average day during the past fiscal year, according to state reports."We need a larger partner to continue to exist," said Agnes P. Nicholas, New Children's director of public relations and development.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 2, 2010
John Milton McIntyre, a retired orthopedic surgeon whose operations allowed patients to regain the use of their hands, died Tuesday of pancreatic cancer at his home in the northern section of Roland Park. He was 67. He was born in Cumberland and raised in Westernport, where his father was owner and general manager of the McIntyre Bakery. He spent his summers on Deep Creek Lake, where his family had a cottage. After graduating as valedictorian of Bruce High School in 1960, he earned a degree in chemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 2, 2010
John Milton McIntyre, a retired orthopedic surgeon whose operations allowed patients to regain the use of their hands, died Tuesday of pancreatic cancer at his home in the northern section of Roland Park. He was 67. He was born in Cumberland and raised in Westernport, where his father was owner and general manager of the McIntyre Bakery. He spent his summers on Deep Creek Lake, where his family had a cottage. After graduating as valedictorian of Bruce High School in 1960, he earned a degree in chemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer , susan.reimer@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Holiday pictures, with the kids decked out in their red and green finest, might be one of the first things to go by the wayside as parents attempt to care for a critically ill child. But a trio of photographers brought the photo studio to the children Saturday at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, where nurses and moms primped and fussed over the children, hiding breathing tubes and the wires from heart monitors in order to get that perfect holiday portrait. And, thanks to the generosity of a program called Help Portrait, the finished pictures will be free.
FEATURES
By Thomas H. Maugh II | November 29, 2007
Lung transplants - a treatment of last resort for cystic fibrosis - are rarely beneficial to children with that condition and are often harmful, according to a study released last week. Among 248 children who received a lung transplant over an 11-year period, only one clearly benefited while 167 were at a higher risk of dying after the procedure, Utah researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Julian Allen of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia called the findings "startling" in an editorial in the journal.
NEWS
August 24, 2007
Hopkins Children's Center ranked 3rd In its first ranking of the nation's best children's hospitals, U.S. News & World Report has awarded third place to the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Topping the list is Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, followed by Children's Hospital Boston. Since 1990, the magazine has ranked "America's Best Hospitals," with Johns Hopkins topping the list each year. As part of that, there have been rankings of pediatric departments at various hospitals -- Hopkins has always been in the top four -- but those were based solely on reputation.
NEWS
By Chris Emery, Jonathan Bor and Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery, Jonathan Bor and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTERS | August 22, 2007
Doctors fail to diagnose high blood pressure in more than three-quarters of children with the problem, putting them at risk for heart disease and other organ damage later in life, a new study suggests. Calculating elevated blood pressure in children is more complicated than in adults, and many doctors might not bother evaluating kids' pressure because they assume hypertension is an adult problem, the study found. "Hypertension is a disease that doesn't cause symptoms, particularly in children," said Dr. Richard Lange, chief of clinical cardiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who did not participate in the study.
NEWS
By Charlie Clements | March 7, 2003
I RECENTLY returned from an emergency public health mission to Iraq where I helped assess the consequences of a war on the civilian population, which has in many ways been reduced to the status of refugees. Nearly 60 percent of Iraqis, about 14 million people, depend entirely on government-provided food rations that, by international standards, represent the minimum for human sustenance. Unemployment is greater than 50 percent, and the majority of those who work earn between $4 and $8 a month.
NEWS
August 24, 2007
Hopkins Children's Center ranked 3rd In its first ranking of the nation's best children's hospitals, U.S. News & World Report has awarded third place to the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Topping the list is Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, followed by Children's Hospital Boston. Since 1990, the magazine has ranked "America's Best Hospitals," with Johns Hopkins topping the list each year. As part of that, there have been rankings of pediatric departments at various hospitals -- Hopkins has always been in the top four -- but those were based solely on reputation.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | March 31, 2007
Sinai Hospital announced plans yesterday for a $30 million expansion of its Children's Hospital -- part of a still-under-development plan that could mean $100 million in improvements over the next four to five years. The plans call for a new pediatric outpatient structure near the front of the current hospital, coupled with a floor of new inpatient space over the roof of an existing building, as well as renovation of existing space. Sinai, whose main building was completed in 1959, joins a hospital construction boom in the region, particularly among facilities built in the 1950s and 1960s when expanding suburbs and new federal money fueled rapid growth in medical institutions.
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