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NEWS
January 18, 1994
School Board undermines educationThe conduct of the city's board of education toward the Barclay Elementary School seems to me to border on criminal neglect.Despite organized opposition of the city Department of Education, which used the specious argument that black children could not possibly benefit from the Calvert School curriculum, the curriculum was instituted at Barclay.Barclay and its supporters have proven beyond the shadow of a doubt that the program works. The Calvert curriculum appears to work better than any Department of Education effort.
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NEWS
January 17, 2009
So Maryland schools rank No. 1 ("Maryland schools rank 1st in nation in analysis by 'Education Week,'" Jan. 7). We should be proud of that, but I would claim that a grade of B is not enough. We should have an A. So how do we get one? School systems need to support children and public education by listening to the teachers. They can also pay more, recruit teachers from the better colleges of education, insist that colleges provide full-year internships as opposed to student teaching, provide mentors and more planning time or instructional assistants to new teachers, and offer meaningful professional development for all teachers.
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NEWS
October 14, 1990
Carroll schools have received a $103,623 federal grant to begin a program that will educate and involve parents in their children's education.The family centered program, called Even Start, will combine adult education, parenting education and early childhood education. Its purpose is to improve the basic skill levels of parents to enable them to serve as their children's first teacher and at the same time improve their own educational level."As much as we try at school, the real effect comes at home," said Pat Snowberger, career adviser for Carroll's Multi-Service Center.
NEWS
February 8, 2008
Vouchers open up opportunities Opposing President Bush's school voucher plan, state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick states, "We support public education because it is the crucible of our democracy" ("Vouchers revisited," Feb. 3). In principle, I agree with this patriotic philosophy. However, one important clarification is needed: We must support quality public education. And the sad truth is that in many big cities, including Baltimore, thousands of children are trapped in poor-performing public schools.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
A group of children at River Hill Village Center surrounded actress Helen O'Grady one recent afternoon and yelled as loud as they could. The ruckus was music to O'Grady's ears. As the founder and executive director of DramaKids International, O'Grady has developed an organization that uses the arts to teach children confidence and verbal skills The after-school program made its United States debut in Howard County, enrolling dozens of youngsters who come for one, fun-filled hour a week.
NEWS
By Neal Malicky | September 19, 1990
THOUGH many take issue with his singling out of Hispanics, U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos is right in saying that parents could be doing more for their children's education. While the problems facing our schools today are extremely complex, there are some very basic things that parents can do to help out. Most of these begin with a long look in a mirror.A parent who is too busy to model the behavior of an educated person for his or her children is, in deed, "too busy." A number of "too busy" parents want the schools to compensate for their own deficiencies, and they criticize the schools for failing to make up for their own failures.
NEWS
May 16, 1998
Slots for schools not a gamble everyone wants to makeWhy is it that politicians feel that we lack the ability to see how we are being led down the lpath of no return.I remember when we were told that the piggyback tax was just a temporary solution to a problem that is still with us many years after its implementation.The lottery and Lotto and all the other games of chance we can buy with the dream of winning millions was suppose to pay the bill for education in Maryland.Now we are told we need slots to help pay for education.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2006
Rhonda Pindell-Charles of the Anne Arundel County Public Schools was trying to come up with a program that would help parents in the Annapolis area when she settled on a simple idea: combining sports and education. Pindell-Charles is a driving force behind "FamilyHood Scores!," a program that county schools developed in partnership with 14 county and city organizations and with businesses to help parents get more involved in their children's education while also playing basketball. The program, which serves the Annapolis area, takes place on Thursday nights.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | March 8, 1993
Washington. -- This month in Chicago an emancipation may begin. A judge will decide whether to hear a suit brought by some inner-city parents and children, charging that the state is failing to fulfill its education duty.The suit seeks an empowering remedy -- vouchers, with a value of the pro-rata share of state funds allotted to the children's education. The vouchers would be redeemable at public or private schools.Welcome to judicial activism of the sort advocated by the Institute for Justice, a Washington group of young libertarian lawyers.
NEWS
November 1, 2007
Finding new options for urban education Baltimore spends more than $10,000 per student each year on education. For Kalman R. Hettleman to suggest that even more money is needed is preposterous ("Don't deny state's kids a quality education," Opinion Commentary, Oct. 28). The level of funding is adequate, and children around the globe receive a quality education for much less money. As a society, we need to accept that far too many children grow up in dangerous and violent communities, with uncaring parents numbed by generations of welfare dependency, and that this has had an enormous negative effect on public education.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2006
Rhonda Pindell-Charles of the Anne Arundel County Public Schools was trying to come up with a program that would help parents in the Annapolis area when she settled on a simple idea: combining sports and education. Pindell-Charles is a driving force behind "FamilyHood Scores!," a program that county schools developed in partnership with 14 county and city organizations and with businesses to help parents get more involved in their children's education while also playing basketball. The program, which serves the Annapolis area, takes place on Thursday nights.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | July 14, 2005
IT IS THE BEST of times in terms of life expectancy and a level of economic prosperity exceeding anything our grandparents would have imagined. It is an era of technological wonders providing instant interactions by phone, fax or the Internet with friends around the world, not to mention worldwide television broadcasts and other scientific achievements. Yet, within living memory, there was a time when we were not afraid to go out at night, even in low-income neighborhoods, when parents didn't have to fear for their children's safety in schools, much less teachers have to fear for their own safety.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
On billboards going up around Baltimore, a child jumps for joy and an accompanying message encourages parents to "be the power" behind their children's education. The curious message -- along with a toll-free number for information -- comes from a Washington-based education nonprofit that is trying to encourage inner-city parents with children in failing schools to ask for free tutoring or a transfer to a better school. The nonprofit, StandardsWork Inc., hopes to encourage parents to take advantage of provisions in the complex federal law called No Child Left Behind that gives parents those alternatives.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
A group of children at River Hill Village Center surrounded actress Helen O'Grady one recent afternoon and yelled as loud as they could. The ruckus was music to O'Grady's ears. As the founder and executive director of DramaKids International, O'Grady has developed an organization that uses the arts to teach children confidence and verbal skills The after-school program made its United States debut in Howard County, enrolling dozens of youngsters who come for one, fun-filled hour a week.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | June 28, 1998
EARLIER THIS month, the Baltimore County Board of Education refused to let parents in Woodbridge Valley, a community near Woodlawn, pay $20,000 to rent a portable classroom -- the first step, they hoped, toward converting their elementary into the county's first kindergarten through eighth-grade school. It was the right decision, but I doubt the many parents with candy bars and pizza kits waiting in the refrigerator to be sold understand why.Why, at a time when schools desperately seek parental involvement and use donations for everything from stadium lights to computers, should parents not be allowed to help buy the kind of school they want?
NEWS
May 16, 1998
Slots for schools not a gamble everyone wants to makeWhy is it that politicians feel that we lack the ability to see how we are being led down the lpath of no return.I remember when we were told that the piggyback tax was just a temporary solution to a problem that is still with us many years after its implementation.The lottery and Lotto and all the other games of chance we can buy with the dream of winning millions was suppose to pay the bill for education in Maryland.Now we are told we need slots to help pay for education.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | July 30, 1992
For nearly 50 years, three rules -- potent but unwritten -- have governed the way America's middle class viewed its children's education.The first was that Sonny and Sissy must go to college at age 18 -- preferably a private one with an attitude -- or their lives would surely be a study in misery.The second was that their education should end at age 22, or whenever the progression of expensive advanced degrees wascompleted. Otherwise, the kids would suffer unmentionable shame.The third was that the parents of Sonny and Sissy were morally obliged to pay for this academic marathon.
NEWS
January 17, 2009
So Maryland schools rank No. 1 ("Maryland schools rank 1st in nation in analysis by 'Education Week,'" Jan. 7). We should be proud of that, but I would claim that a grade of B is not enough. We should have an A. So how do we get one? School systems need to support children and public education by listening to the teachers. They can also pay more, recruit teachers from the better colleges of education, insist that colleges provide full-year internships as opposed to student teaching, provide mentors and more planning time or instructional assistants to new teachers, and offer meaningful professional development for all teachers.
NEWS
November 19, 1997
Crack down on truants and adult conspiratorsI am a retired educator who has become acutely aware of one of the greatest problems confronting the school systems: truancy. I would proffer the observation that parents and other adults are the major source of this illegal act.Daily, as I travel through the Baltimore metropolitan area, I see an increasingly large number of adults with children who should be in school. I'm not talking about the occasional parent-child combination with a medical appointment.
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