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By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | February 21, 2006
Nan Hayden Agle, an author whose numerous children's books included a series about the adventures of triplet boys and a story about a former slave, died Feb. 14 at Copper Ridge in Sykesville of complications from a fall. She was 100. She was born Anna Bradford Hayden on her family's Catonsville farm, Nancy's Fancy on Nunnery Lane - now part of the Academy Heights neighborhood. She was a 1923 graduate of Catonsville High School. In several autobiographical articles Mrs. Agle wrote for The Sun, she recalled an inspiring high school English teacher who "sits enthroned in the highest seat of memory.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | January 13, 2008
Whether he's writing a book about American crocodiles that he hunted in the Florida Keys, or a black bear that he spotted on his Vermont farm, Jim Arnosky spends his life teaching children about nature and wildlife. He recently visited Darlington Elementary School, where he entertained students with original stories and songs. "I want the kids to hear what it's like for my wife and I to go to a place and have our experiences turn into a book," said Arnosky, who has written 105 non-fiction children's books.
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NEWS
June 26, 2005
Thursday film screenings based on children's books The Carroll Arts Center will screen six films based on classic children's literature at 1 p.m. Thursdays in the theater at 91 W. Main St., Westminster. All tickets are $3. Scheduled movies are: Thursday: Swiss Family Robinson. This 1960 Walt Disney film is about a shipwrecked family that turns a desert island into a dream paradise complete with a three-story treehouse and a menagerie of tame animals. July 7: Old Yeller: Adventure and love are blended together in this 1957 Walt Disney story of a farm family in Texas and a stray dog that plays an unforgettable part in their lives.
NEWS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
Moving from a suburban bookstore to a swanky ballroom, this year's Book Bash will feature nearly 50 authors, including historians, actors and writers of children's books. After more than 600 people attended last year at the Greetings and Readings in Hunt Valley, organizers moved tonight's event downtown to the Tremont Grand. This year, a bigger space, a jazz band and flutist, caterers and presentations by authors Chip Silverman and Michael Tucker (of L.A. Law fame) may mean an even larger turnout, said Caryn Sagal, the event's publicity chair.
NEWS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
Moving from a suburban bookstore to a swanky ballroom, this year's Book Bash will feature nearly 50 authors, including historians, actors and writers of children's books. After more than 600 people attended last year at the Greetings and Readings in Hunt Valley, organizers moved tonight's event downtown to the Tremont Grand. This year, a bigger space, a jazz band and flutist, caterers and presentations by authors Chip Silverman and Michael Tucker (of L.A. Law fame) may mean an even larger turnout, said Caryn Sagal, the event's publicity chair.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | December 3, 2006
WHEN JOAN DEVELIN COLEY CAME to McDaniel, then known as Western Maryland College, she planned to stay just three years. That was more than 30 years ago. "I fell in love with the place," she says. Coley, 62, is a woman comfortable with love. She loves her husband, certainly. She loves being a grandmother. She loves education and books. She loves dessert and beautiful jewelry (not necessarily in that order). 1 Trip to Hungary "To tour the country and to visit McDaniel's campus in Budapest.
NEWS
May 1, 2000
CHILDREN'S books don't have long lives. Often they get one or two readings and are shelved, never to be opened again. Others are read intensively for weeks and sometimes months, and then they are outgrown. Baltimore County libraries are giving parents with collections of children's books the opportunity to clear those volumes from their bookshelves. Working in conjunciton with Baltimore Reads and Baltimore County Literacy Works, the libraries are in the midst of a month-long drive to collect thousands fo new or gently used children's books.
NEWS
September 12, 2005
WHAT A TREAT. Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library has started issuing cards especially for the under-6 crowd. First Card users can check out picture books, early-readers and other kids' stuff, helping them get pumped for big-kid school. Plus they get a little slack on the return policy - no late fees. So, say mom or dad accidentally left Leo the Late Bloomer at Aunt Ginny's house for a month and you just got it back and who knows how much you owe on it. No problem, city librarians say, just bring it in and all's forgiven; the important thing is to keep listening to the stories, looking at the pictures and enjoying the reading.
FEATURES
October 21, 1998
The first English book for children appeared in 1744, assembled by publisher John Newbery - who also sold school textbooks and patent medicines. The popularity of "A Little Pretty Pocket Book" led to the growth of publishing for children through the rest of the 18th century. Some critics consider these early volumes to be more propaganda than literature because their real goal was to help parents in the religious and moral upbringing of their children.The idea of producing entertaining children's books has always been at war with printing books that are supposed to be instructive or inspiring.
NEWS
January 14, 2001
25 years ago: "Town Library on the Move, to Open Soon - Furniture Moving Begins Tomorrow With Help of Kiwanians - Children and Adults will Help Transport Books." Still perched in an attic-like room atop the town office, the Mt. Airy Public Library is about to swoop down into quarters of greater dignity and space. Furniture moving with the help of Kiwanians begins tomorrow at 9 a.m. Donuts and coffee will help fuel the move. Monday afternoon town children will bring their books home from school and then carry more books -- children's books from the old library quarters to the new. Thursday, January 6, adults will transport their books.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 6, 2007
Wally Bunker, 62, the ex-Orioles pitcher and one of the heroes of the 1966 World Series, is living in Lowell, Ohio, where he makes earthenware pottery and writes children's books with his wife, Kathy. He had a sale yesterday morning -- three pots "decorated with flowers and wreaths," as he described them. "It's no big deal. I'm pretty much retired," he said yesterday. In 1966, the Orioles won the World Series in a four-game sweep of the Los Angeles Dodgers. In Game 3, Bunker pitched a six-hit, 1-0 shutout in between other shutouts by Jim Palmer and Dave McNally.
NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,sun reporter | July 19, 2007
A year ago, Baltimore Health Commissioner Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein challenged city pediatricians serving young, low-income patients to participate in Reach Out and Read, a national program that asks doctors to dole out books with shots and prescriptions. About a third of the 72 pediatric practices were already participating, sending each child between the ages of 6 months to five years old away with a book after each checkup, a total of 37,000 books a year. Yesterday, Sharfstein announced that 20 more practices have met his challenge, making Baltimore the city with the fastest program expansion rate in the country and putting 18,514 more books into circulation.
NEWS
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Los Angeles Times | March 4, 2007
Susan Patron is the kind of reader who really lives books: She jokes that years before she came to work in the Los Angeles Public Library system she spent virtually all her free time in its branches. When she met the man who would become her husband, some of their early dates were at Chatterton's, the now shuttered Los Angeles bookstore. But now this warm, cardigan-clad veteran of the city's Central Library - a well-known and admired figure in the city's children's lit circles - has become a kind of Henry Miller of the preteen set. Her recent Newbery Award-winning book, The Higher Power of Lucky, aimed at readers ages 9 to 11, has been denounced by librarians, some of whom have declined to order it, all over the country.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | January 7, 2007
First-grader Reilly Robertson brought in a Junie B. Jones book for Bring Your Favorite Book Day at Atholton Elementary School. Sitting on a chair while the other students in Sheila Shaw's class sat on the floor around her, Reilly explained that one of her favorite scenes was when Junie B. Jones, the first-grade main character in this Barbara Park book, "ate something she wasn't supposed to eat in a store, and she was hiding." Shaw prompted Reilly to continue. "She gets in trouble a lot," she said.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | December 3, 2006
WHEN JOAN DEVELIN COLEY CAME to McDaniel, then known as Western Maryland College, she planned to stay just three years. That was more than 30 years ago. "I fell in love with the place," she says. Coley, 62, is a woman comfortable with love. She loves her husband, certainly. She loves being a grandmother. She loves education and books. She loves dessert and beautiful jewelry (not necessarily in that order). 1 Trip to Hungary "To tour the country and to visit McDaniel's campus in Budapest.
NEWS
By JOSHUA M. SHARFSTEIN | June 14, 2006
When I was a pediatrician in training at Boston Medical Center, I had a routine for the end of each examination. I would open a special cabinet and offer my little patient a treat. Not a sticker, not a lollipop, not a toy. A book. As the child reached out with wide eyes, I would seize the opportunity to speak with his or her parents about how much fun and important it is to read aloud. Today, as health commissioner for Baltimore, I am asking every doctor and nurse serving low-income families to adopt a similar routine.
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,Special to the Sun | September 18, 1995
The birth of sidewalk cafes in Annapolis triggers some wonderful memories from earlier travels, and some shudders as well. I love the leisurely pace that a sidewalk cafe implies, and the interest in what's going on outside one's own tight sphere. Some of the best meals I've ever eaten were at sidewalk cafes -- and some of the most expensive.They also have their drawbacks. I was never particularly fond of the edge imparted to my meals by diesel fumes, or the flies that wanted to share the baklava.
NEWS
September 17, 2000
Editor's Note: Jerdine Nolen today discusses how to make a green meal. Her column appears biweekly. Some books leave a lingering aftertaste. After reading such a book with your child, try out a recipe, included in some books, or make up one. Why stop with just one dish? How about a whole meal? Before fall sets in, try to keep a bit of summer's verdant spirit; help your child plan a green meal. You might find "green eggs and ham" taste great for breakfast! Get inspiration from Dr. Seuss or from any of the following books: * "Seven Silly Eaters" by Mary Ann Hoberman * "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" by Eric Carle * "Bread and Jam for Frances" by Russell Hoban * "Never Take a Pig to Lunch" by Nadine Bernard Westcott * "To Market, To Market" by Anne Miranda Help your child make a list of green foods your family likes to eat such as: green tea lime gelatin celery mint jelly spinach pasta pickles vegetables: beans, spinach, broccoli, greens, lettuce, cucumber, green pepper, tomatoes Key lime yogurt Determine where each green food fits into one the four basic food groups: Grains Dairy Meat / Protein Fruits / Vegetables Plan a green meal Help your child put together a nutritious meal based on the four food groups.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2006
How many of you have been to Assateague, author Larry Points asked the youngsters who were sitting cross-legged on the floor in the media center of Clemens Crossing Elementary School. About half the children raised their hands. Then he asked how many of the kindergartners, first-graders and second-graders had been to Ocean City. Many more hands stretched in the air. Points, co-author of several children's books about Assateague and the former chief of park interpretation at the Assateague Island National Seashore, urged the children to visit the island next time they were in Ocean City.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | February 21, 2006
Nan Hayden Agle, an author whose numerous children's books included a series about the adventures of triplet boys and a story about a former slave, died Feb. 14 at Copper Ridge in Sykesville of complications from a fall. She was 100. She was born Anna Bradford Hayden on her family's Catonsville farm, Nancy's Fancy on Nunnery Lane - now part of the Academy Heights neighborhood. She was a 1923 graduate of Catonsville High School. In several autobiographical articles Mrs. Agle wrote for The Sun, she recalled an inspiring high school English teacher who "sits enthroned in the highest seat of memory.
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