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NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
TANEYTOWN -- Residents of the Roberts Mill Run neighborhood voiced their disapproval of an action by one of their neighbors that would stop children from playing in the road at Monday's City Council meeting.Although city attorney Thomas Stansfield said a law is on the books that restricts children's activities in the street, Diana Kemp of Taney Drive said she sees nothing wrong with her children playing in the neighborhood."The children play in the dead end courts in our neighborhood, not in the roadway," said Mrs. Kemp, who has two children, Billy, 13, and Shannon, 10. "I don't send my children out to play in the street, but I'm not changing anything my kids do because they don't cause trouble."
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
Two men were shot outside a Southwest Baltimore apartment where residents said six children were playing on Monday. Officers were called just before 4 p.m. to the 2100 block of Eagle St. in Carrollton Ridge, where they found a 20-year-old man with a gunshot wound to his leg, police said. Another man, a 23-year-old, was found shot in the leg and hand in the 1900 block of W. Baltimore St. a short time later. Dorthy Umstead, 25, said her two children, her niece and three other children were in her home at the time.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 7, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- After spending two afternoons watching elementary school children play, two undergraduate California State University researchers in Fullerton have a warning for parents: Allowing your children to watch "Mighty Morphin Power Rangers" can be dangerous to other youngsters' health.The student researchers reported that children exposed to a "Power Rangers" episode immediately responded by harassing playmates with karate kicks and shoves.Children who were not allowed to watch the single episode of the Fox television mega-hit did nothing worse than take other youngsters' crayons in the hour after the show, the observers found in their two-day study last fall.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | September 27, 2009
The problem:: A smelly utility pole languished in Patterson Park. The backstory:: John Lundquist noticed a utility pole lying in the park across the street from his Ellwood Avenue home, as well as several others on Linwood Avenue, in July. The poles on Linwood disappeared after a few weeks, but "this one across the street just sat and sat and sat." He called 311 to report it. He spotted a tag on the pole indicating that it belonged to Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., so he also called the utility.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | April 15, 1993
If play is the work of childhood, then toys are the tools of that trade. But the tools are seldom the same for boys and girls. Despite the efforts of parents, teachers and other adults who, over the last 30 years, have tried to get children to play with toys that are less stereotyped by gender, it is almost a sure bet which children in a preschool will be brushing Barbie's hair and which will be crashing toy trucks."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | April 15, 1993
About 20 years ago, Dr. Phyllis A. Katz conducted what has come to be known as the "Baby X" experiment. At a psychology laboratory, adults were introduced to a 3-month-old infant wearing a yellow jumpsuit. Some were told that the child's name was Mary, while others were told that it was Johnny.There were three toys in the room: a doll, a small football and a gender-neutral toy. The adults who thought they were with a girl tended to offer the baby the doll. Those who thought they were with a boy were more likely to use the football.
FEATURES
January 18, 1991
Not even the smallest citizens are immune from war and the fears it generates."Very young children, preschoolers for example, will not have conception of what a war is. But they'll see Mom and Dad are worried about something, and this will be scary because to preschoolers, Mom and Dad are the world," said Marc Nemiroff, a child psychologist in Annandale, Va. "And as they get older, 7 or 8 years old, they have a sense of the world at large and what being...
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1996
Children in Mount Airy may get the Town Council's permission to play in the streets -- as long as they stay in designated "play zones."But some residents say the real problem is groups of teen-agers cursing loudly, smoking, scattering trash and vandalizing parked cars. More parks, recreational facilities and even council-approved play zones may not be the answer, they say.The council banned playing in the streets in October in response to residents' complaints, but allowed a veto by Mayor Gerald R. Johnson to stand.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | May 5, 1991
At this time of year, you can always tell a working parent with children too young to stay home alone and too old for a day-care center. We're the ones who look distracted and know to the minute how long it is before school ends. We're also the ones who stop even total strangers in order to ask, "Do you know of anyone who's taking care of children in her home this summer?"Unfortunately, even if we finally locate one of these all-too-rare caregivers, our work has just begun. While most neighborhood caregivers are reliable, hard-working, competent and caring, a tiny minority are not.Here are some questions to ask before entrusting your child to any caregiver for even one minute:* Are you licensed by this state to care for children in your home?
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
Fifty-six kids. Four digits. One objective: Get to the number 24. And any way you add, subtract, multiply or divide it, many of Anne Arundel County's fourth- and fifth-graders agree that the game "24" is a fun way to practice math. During the past two weeks, children from nearly 50 county elementary schools have competed in regional tournaments of the game, which tests problem-solving skills and basic math knowledge. To play, groups of four children are dealt a card with four numbers on it. The players apply different operations -- addition, subtraction, multiplication, division -- to the numbers to find a way to reach 24. The top six winners from each regional competition will meet next month to determine the countywide elementary school champion.
NEWS
January 14, 2007
A drop-in program for mothers, grandmothers and children, will be held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Jan. 22 at the east Columbia library. The program, called Mommy and Me Cafe, is an opportunity for mothers to meet and mingle with other parents while children play. It is sponsored by La Leche of Columbia, a chapter of the international organization that offers information, guidance and support to breastfeeding mothers. Information: 410-309-4940 or 410-461-3423. Around Town Minding manners -- Long Reach Community Association will offer a six-week session of classes for boys and girls, ages 8 to 13, in etiquette, social skills and manners.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Their first broadcast started out with hysterical laughter. They were nervous, excited and couldn't believe they were on the radio. And just in case listeners were equally incredulous, Charrika Kelly let them know what was what. "We're on the radio, y'all," the 13-year-old said. "Can you hear us on your radio?" That was two months and eight broadcasts ago. Now the members of the Eastport Radio Club have settled in on 1600 AM, recalling that inaugural broadcast and the progress they've made - and fun they've had - since then.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2005
Rob Nagle stomped across a stage yesterday, shouting in a gravelly voice to portray a boorish, discontented Sun in a play about the solar system. Then he put on a fake beak to play a talking toucan in a tale about why palm trees have coconuts. The quirky roles figured in a pair of plays written by Baltimore second-graders and performed by professional actors last night at Center Stage's annual Young Playwrights Festival. This is the first year festival organizers have accepted submissions from children as young as first-graders - and organizers said they are glad they did. Two of the five plays chosen from among 250 entries were written by three city second-graders: Dylan Balter and Hanna Lau, 7-year-olds who attend Midtown Academy, and 8-year-old Lizzie Smith of Bryn Mawr School.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
Fifty-six kids. Four digits. One objective: Get to the number 24. And any way you add, subtract, multiply or divide it, many of Anne Arundel County's fourth- and fifth-graders agree that the game "24" is a fun way to practice math. During the past two weeks, children from nearly 50 county elementary schools have competed in regional tournaments of the game, which tests problem-solving skills and basic math knowledge. To play, groups of four children are dealt a card with four numbers on it. The players apply different operations -- addition, subtraction, multiplication, division -- to the numbers to find a way to reach 24. The top six winners from each regional competition will meet next month to determine the countywide elementary school champion.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
Fifty-six kids. Four digits. One objective: Get to the number 24. And any way you add, subtract, multiply or divide it, many of Anne Arundel County's fourth-and fifth-graders agree that the game "24" is a fun way to practice math. During the past two weeks, children from nearly 50 county elementary schools have competed in regional tournaments of the game, which tests problem-solving skills as well as basic math knowledge. To play, groups of four children are dealt a card with four numbers on it. The players apply different operations - addition, subtraction, multiplication, division - to the numbers to find a way to reach 24. The top six winners from each regional competition will meet next month to determine the countywide elementary school champion.
NEWS
By Caitlin O'Grady and Caitlin O'Grady,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
An imaginary beast loved by children across the United Kingdom will visit Columbia this weekend when the Candlelight Concerts Society Performing Arts Series for Children presents The Gruffalo at 2:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. The Gruffalo is a story of a mouse who, when threatened by three other creatures, proclaims he is having lunch with a monster and that the creatures threatening him - a fox, an owl and a rattlesnake - are the monster's favorite food.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
Fifty-six kids. Four digits. One objective: Get to the number 24. And any way you add, subtract, multiply or divide it, many of Anne Arundel County's fourth-and fifth-graders agree that the game "24" is a fun way to practice math. During the past two weeks, children from nearly 50 county elementary schools have competed in regional tournaments of the game, which tests problem-solving skills as well as basic math knowledge. To play, groups of four children are dealt a card with four numbers on it. The players apply different operations - addition, subtraction, multiplication, division - to the numbers to find a way to reach 24. The top six winners from each regional competition will meet next month to determine the countywide elementary school champion.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
Isabel Mangana was a steamboat captain, a New York fashion model and a Pablo Picasso protege all in one day. It was more than she expected from a trip to the museum."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
A storm drain pipe has been spilling sewage into Stony Run in North Baltimore at least since May, contaminating an area where children frequently swim, city officials acknowledged yesterday. The leak, located under University Parkway near the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus, discharges up to 20 gallons of contaminated water a minute, said Robert H. Murrow, a spokesman for the city Department of Public Works. At a constant rate, that would be 28,800 gallons a day - a "medium" sewage spill under Maryland Department of the Environment guidelines.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 31, 2000
FREIBURG, Germany - When French troops abandoned a riverside base here in 1994, ecology activists envisioned a solar-powered utopia sprouting where the war machine had been, with kids tumbling in leafy courtyards without risk of getting run over, and bike stands supplanting driveways in blissful tribute to a life without cars. But most of the starry-eyed initiators of the Vauban auto-free community have come to realize that life moves too fast to keep pace without occasional aid from the internal-combustion engine.
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