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NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein | June 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When Bill Bradley detailed his views on childhood poverty earlier this month in Los Angeles, two words were conspicuously missing from his speech: absent fathers.Mr. Bradley came no closer to that subject than some fleeting references to the stresses confronting single parents. As a senator from New Jersey, Mr. Bradley had worked to toughen child-support collection from absent fathers, but in his speech, he casually dismissed those who believe that childhood poverty cannot be addressed without attacking the broader cultural problem of fragmenting families -- a much more explosive issue on the left.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 13, 2014
I fully agree with commentator Ned Holstein's view that parenthood generally should be shared (" Joint custody should be the rule, not the exception," Oct. 8). As a father of two who fights for his children only because their mother wishes to control them, the courts all to often allow this to happen to great quality dads. Fathers are being cut out of our children's lives for the financial gain of others - mothers and their attorneys. Joe Phillips - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With the debate over reducing the country's welfare rolls focusing renewed attention on the rising birthrate among unwed women, the Census Bureau reports that such births soared by more than 70 percent from 1983 to 1993.According to figures released by the bureau yesterday, 6.3 million children, or 27 percent of all children under the age of 18, lived in 1993 with a single parent who had never married, up from 3.7 million in 1983.The report showed that the annual increase in the number of children born out of wedlock slowed in the 1980s, but it also documented the sharp rise in these kinds of births over the past three decades.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
When I read about all the wonderful programs public libraries have for children, it baffles me that people still hold to the idea the government should get rid of libraries ( "Imagination takes flight during Owls and Bats story time at nature center," Oct. 23). While it's true that computers and instant access to books, movies, games, etc. are causing libraries to suffer, libraries still provide invaluable programs for children of all ages, such as the wildlife program at Piney Run Nature Center, as well as story times, concerts and other creative activities.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 14, 2001
WASHINGTON - It is a familiar message in the conventional wisdom of our culture: The two-parent family is in decline. But some of the newest evidence suggests that the tidal flow away from two-parent families peaked years ago and might be starting to change. The strongest hints of a change in behavior are emerging from low-income and minority communities, groups that have paid the greatest price for family breakdown since the 1960s. An analysis of year-to-year government data found that the proportion of black children living with two married parents - although still near record lows - rose 11.8 percent from 1995 to 2000.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
An annual survey that monitors the well-being of Maryland's children has found slight improvements in the rates of infant mortality and teen pregnancy.But the survey released last week also shows alarming increases in violence against children and the number of children living in poverty.The 1995 Maryland's Kids Count Factbook, a four-year survey funded by the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation, found improvement in 10 of 14 indicators used to measure the well-being of children in the areas of economics, health, safety and education.
NEWS
February 15, 1994
FROM the new Maryland "Kids Count Factbook":"There have been profound changes in family composition over the past three decades. These changes came as a result of more women working outside the home, diminishing employment opportunities for young people, declining family wages and changing attitudes about marriage and family structure."More children live with one parent [in 1990, as compared to 1970 and 1980]. Although most children lived with two parents, one in five children lived in a single-parent family in 1990.
NEWS
April 8, 1999
CONSIDERING ITS relative wealth, Maryland continues to do a lousy job of raising its children. Other states have more children living in poverty, yet Maryland fares worse in key areas of child welfare.It would be easier to celebrate the good news -- better prenatal care, lower infant mortality and fewer teens dying violently -- if Maryland did not have such a long way to go. In the Annie E. Casey Foundation's latest "Kids Count" survey last year, Maryland ranked 32nd in child welfare, although three-fifths of the states had a higher percentage of children living in poverty.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2003
The number of children living in severely distressed neighborhoods in Maryland and nationwide increased substantially in the 1990s despite the decade's booming economy, according to a study released yesterday. Based on data from the 1990 and 2000 censuses, the study by the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Washington-based Population Reference Bureau found that the number of children living in such neighborhoods nationwide increased by nearly 1 million to 4.4 million, and in Maryland by nearly 13,000 to just over 47,000.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
Maryland has a smaller share of children living with unemployed parents than any other state, according to a national report on how children fare across America. But it ranks close to the bottom in low-birth-weight babies and infant mortality, with a greater percentage than most other states. "Kids Count 2002," an annual report of the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation, ranked Maryland 21st among states on 10 indicators of child well-being -- down from 19th place last year. The report is based largely on 1999 statistics, the last year for which the foundation says it can gather reliable national data.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Maryland, which has seen improvements in childhood education and health in recent years, ranks No. 10 in the country for overall child well-being, according to a report released today by the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation. Despite the high ranking for the second year in a row - Maryland was also 10th last year - children in the state have lost ground in some measures, including a growing number of them living in poverty since the recession, the foundation said. "We're a big believer in going to where the data takes you," said Patrick T. McCarthy, the foundation's president and CEO. "What the data shows on the economic well-being of children since 2005, Maryland and other states have slipped.
EXPLORE
February 29, 2012
Play is all but absent in our children's over-programmed lives, as Marco della Cava notes in his story, "Calendar Is Blank on May 22. " Free time needs to come back into our kids' lives, and it needs to happen now. There is a nationwide scarcity of play, and we are beginning to see a stark difference between children who play and children who don't. Kids who play are healthier. Kids who play are less likely to be obese and develop obesity-related health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
For a few hours after school, Ryan Johnson is just like most 16-year-olds. He lounges on the couch with his favorite Xbox game or checks his Facebook page. But then reality sets in. He decamps from his cousins' house for the Howard County cold-weather shelter. Dinner is a meal with his father and 20 other homeless people. He goes to bed early, on a green plastic mat next to strangers, who also have no other place to go in one of the state's wealthiest counties. "It has been really hard," said Ryan, a junior at Wilde Lake High School in Columbia.
NEWS
December 23, 2011
Although many of us of us are affected by the current economic doldrums, the Maryland Transit Administration Police are raising the bar to challenge those of us who are able to take care of ourselves and our families. Recently, 15 families at Northwood Elementary School in Baltimore City benefited from the generosity of the MTA Police. Under the leadership of Officer Stan Smith and with their own money, these officers gave these families among the best holiday seasons ever. Every wish list of every child was filled with major gifts such as bicycles, computers, Wii video game systems, art supplies, clothing, scooters, athletic equipment, dolls and games.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
In the early '70s, Eddie Blair was known as a friendly kid to the women at the corner grocery near his Locust Point home. "Ed worked up there. And those mothers and neighbors, they all just loved him," recalls his aunt and godmother, Mary Cadden, 83. But as he moved into middle school, a troubling change came over Eddie, the youngest of three boys in the Blair family. He became secretive and sensitive. And he grew angry, storming one day from a middle school classroom and slamming against the lockers until he was sent home.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell | June 21, 2007
Across the state, more children are being tested for lead, and fewer are showing elevated levels of the hazard in their blood streams, the Maryland Department of the Environment announced yesterday. In 2006, the department tested 102,974 children under the age of 6, compared with 99,148 in 2005. In Baltimore, which is an area of high risk for lead levels among children, 18,363 children were tested, an increase from 17,943 in 2005. In 2006, 1,274 children had an elevated blood lead level, which by law is 10 micrograms per deciliter or above, compared with 1,331 children in 2005.
NEWS
By Wade F. Horn | August 23, 1999
FOR ANY of the year 2000 presidential contenders searching for a school reform proposal guaranteed to improve test scores and educational achievement of America's children, I have just one word: Fathers. An involved father in every home is the best school reform initiative there is.Granted, delivering on this campaign promise won't be easy. Our society is still paying the price for 30 years of cultural denial about the importance of fathers and marriage, fooling ourselves into believing that children don't need fathers for anything but a child-support check and that any family structure is as good as any other.
FEATURES
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 19, 2003
Fewer children are living in married-couple households than ever before, and fewer adults think the main purpose of marriage is to raise children. The result, according to a report issued by the National Marriage Project, based at Rutgers University's Piscataway, N.J., campus, is that American children are less able to count on marriage to provide a secure foundation for their lives. "If there is a story to be told about marriage in recent decades, it is not that it is withering away for adults, but that it is withering away as a family experience for children," said one of the report's authors, Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, co-director of the National Marriage Project.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | October 22, 2006
In the corner of the kindergarten classroom, four little girls in pink shirts stacked large cardboard blocks in rows to build a castle as tall as they were - even when standing on tippy-toes. Every few minutes a group of blocks would tumble in a heap, and laughter would erupt. Nearby, a girl climbed on a table to investigate what imprint her knees would make as she crawled across Play-Doh. Old-fashioned play such as that in Jody Herman's classroom at Elkridge Elementary in Howard County is becoming less common these days as Maryland schools phase in full-day kindergarten and encourage a more academic curriculum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 2004
When your bedtime is 8 p.m. or earlier, going to a dinner theater doesn't quite fit your schedule. Fortunately for the 12-and-under set, a few area theaters offer lunch and a show. With menu choices such as cheese pizza, a hot dog or peanut butter and jelly sandwich and shows including Sleeping Beauty, Jack and the Beanstalk and Charlotte's Web, kids have a chance to get caught up in the excitement of a live performance. Luckily for parents, the experience is also affordable family entertainment.
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