Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChildren Left
IN THE NEWS

Children Left

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Two children left alone at home apparently played with matches last night and caused a fire that left an 18-month-old boy dead and his 3-year-old brother treated for burns, Baltimore VTC fire officials said.The childrens' mother was charged with reckless endangerment, police said.It was the second fatal fire in the city in two days. A fire Saturday night left nine people dead -- seven of them children -- in the 2000 block of Hollins St. in Southwest Baltimore.That fire started when lighted candles ignited some combustible material in the house, which had neither gas nor electricity.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
This time of year, dozens of children across the country die after being forgotten inside sweltering cars. A group of Johns Hopkins University students may have found a way to ensure that parents remember even a silently sleeping baby. As part of a yearlong senior project in engineering, three classmates designed a system, built from popular video game technology, they say will be able to sense a baby's breathing. They modified Xbox's "Kinect" device, perhaps best known for living-room dance competitions, to detect children or pets from a mount in a car's backseat.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kristin Huckshorn and Kristin Huckshorn,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 24, 1992
BARDERA, Somalia -- The main street is quiet.No babies cry.Only a handful of children, all boys, play in the road, using sticks and rocks for toys.Today, when U.S. Marines plan to arrive at this southwestern outpost in Somalia's hardest-hit famine zone, they will find silent testimony that, for many children here, help comes too late."
NEWS
By Helaine Zinaman and Nancy Green | February 17, 2010
As the General Assembly meets in Annapolis, it has its hands full. The devastating side effects of the economic recession must be addressed with urgency and devotion. As lawmakers address such pressing concerns as job creation, foreclosures and pension reform, they cannot ignore several critical education issues, including the curriculum and instruction available to children -- particularly those who show talent and potential in the classroom. Parents and teachers of gifted and talented children have long endured a lack of state resources and support.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- This weekend, Carolynne Zales will have her 3-week-old son baptized.Next week, she'll stop nursing the baby and start him on a bottle.And the following week, with photos and videos of tiny Gene Vincent Zales II packed in her rucksack, the bright-eyed 19-year-old mother and Army reservist will report to a military post in Virginia to receive her marching orders."
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,Contributing Writer | August 20, 1995
When hundreds of Howard County students arrive home from the first day of school Aug. 28, no one will be there to ask how it went. Whether they like it or not, children -- some as young as 5 -- are left alone in the hours between the end of school and their parents' return from work.It's a sign of the times, with many parents working long hours to make ends meet -- particularly in such high-cost areas as Howard County. And experts say parents are leaving children at younger ages and with less guidance than "latchkey" children of yesterday.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 11, 2002
CHICAGO - Donna Spinozza of Gurnee, Ill., admits to occasionally leaving her three youngsters buckled in their car seats while she runs into a bagel shop. She would never leave them in the minivan for more than a few minutes, she says, and she's certainly not the only well-intentioned parent who is reluctant to unload sleeping babies and haul them into the cold during a quick errand. The key is she always keeps a nervous eye on the kids through the store window, she says. Under a new Illinois law, parents who leave their children unattended and out of their view can face child endangerment charges that carry a penalty of up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 1, 2000
Baltimore County fire officials are trying to determine the cause of a blaze that caused an estimated $40,000 in damage to a Dundalk rowhouse yesterday afternoon. One of three children in the house in the 8000 block of Grayhaven Road saw flames in the living room about noon, said Battalion Chief Mark Hubbard. All three children left on their own. Three other children and the adult supervising them were outside. The children, said Hubbard, were between ages 5 and 11 and were not all related.
NEWS
July 24, 1996
IT IS a crime regularly committed by people who don't consider themselves criminals.It is also an action that people know they may regret the rest of their lives -- and risk it anyway.Parents or guardians who leave children unattended in cars, as well as in homes, are breaking the law in Maryland. It is illegal to leave a child under age 8 anywhere unless accompanied by someone at least 13 years old. And yet the scenario of young children left alone in cars, if not homes, seems increasingly commonplace.
NEWS
By From staff reports | July 13, 1992
City man charged in friend's slayingBALTIMORE -- A 26-year-old Southwest Baltimore man was charged yesterday morning in the fatal shooting of a man police described as his best friend.Timothy Wilson of the 3200 block of Phelps Lane was charged with first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of Kevin Walker, 29, of the unit block of N. Hilton St.Homicide Detective Donald Worden said Mr. Walker was shot once in the head and was pronounced dead on the scene. The victim was visiting his friend's house when the shooting occurred.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter@hermann@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
Kenneth Morrison's mother dealt drugs and hasn't been seen in years. His father dealt drugs and just got out of prison. His brother dealt drugs and was stabbed to death three years ago on Malvern Street near O'Donnell Heights. Morrison escaped the street corners in Park Heights, is double-majoring in social work and education at Coppin State University and, at the age of 23, he runs a youth program at the Pimlico Road Arts and Community Center. The young man is working diligently to help others get jobs and stay alive.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | April 4, 2008
VIENNA, Va. -- In the days since police say her estranged husband drowned their three children in a Baltimore hotel bathtub, Dr. Amy Ashley Castillo has clung to her faith to survive. "It's hard to tell you how much pain I'm feeling right now," Castillo said before dozens of reporters yesterday at McLean Bible Church, where she has been a longtime parishioner. In her first public statements since Mark A. Castillo was charged with first-degree murder in the killings of their children - Anthony, 6, Austin, 4, and Athena, 2 - Amy Castillo spoke with measured calm despite the enormous crush of pain.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2007
Anne M. McNicholas, a homemaker who rediscovered her love for painting after raising five children, died of complications from a blood disorder Friday at Talbot Hospice House in Easton. She was 78. Born Anne Marie Harman in Baltimore, she lived for a few years in Norfolk, Va., and then returned with her family to live with her grandmother on Charles Street. She attended SS. Philip and James School. She was a competitive swimmer with a community team at the Lakewood Swimming Pool during her high school years and graduated from Notre Dame Prep in 1946.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2004
In life, David Wisniewski could not help but send bits of his work into the world. His X-acto knife whizzing across colored paper, the children's book illustrator created fantastic scenes in his Monrovia studio: the secret neighborhoods inside a cookie jar, a giant collapsing into a pile of clay. It was inevitable that paper clouds would attach themselves to a child, that neighbors would find scraps that were in fact the castoffs of art, and ask: "What's David working on now?" So it seemed natural when in 2002, his mind and body failing from a brain tumor that would kill him just six weeks after its discovery, Wisniewski urged his wife Donna to sell the original illustrations from 11 of his books.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
For at least a year, the man would regularly bring the two children to Cherry Hill, where he abandoned them in an overgrown field and walked across the train tracks into an area known for heroin dealing, according to police and a witness. Prosecutors say the man was there to buy drugs. Two months ago, a nearby auto repair shop owner called the police to report him. After that, shop owner Aaron M. Gaskins said, the man kept the children out of sight but on Monday stashed them in a muddy patch of reeds.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2003
Dominique Yarbor has the right to attend a better school, according to federal law, but the yellow bus never came to carry her there. So the fifth-grader is walking again to the neighborhood school that the state considers to be failing. "I called the school's transportation unit and I got the runaround," said Towanda Yarbor, who had hoped to send her daughter to Hampstead Hill Elementary in East Baltimore. "They said they were scheduled to pick her up but they didn't have enough buses."
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
"Just a Minute" Is Just Too Long!That's the cry of a countywide poster campaign organized to persuade adults not to risk leaving children alone in vehicles."We're just trying to spread the word to make the public aware that this is a danger," said Debbie Yare, program coordinator at the Howard County Department of Citizens Services.Yare said many parents traveling with their children make quick stops at convenience stores or markets without thinking twice about leaving the children in vehicles.
NEWS
April 22, 1996
PARENTS SUPPOSEDLY know what is best for their children. But recent incidents locally, in which parents left young children unattended for long periods, suggest otherwise. Some adults, it seems, lack the basic common sense and decency to put their children's needs ahead of their own.Larry Robinson, 46, of Southwest Baltimore was arrested and taken into custody by city police for an outstanding traffic violation a week ago. He neglected to tell the officer that he had left his 16-month-old son home alone.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 11, 2002
CHICAGO - Donna Spinozza of Gurnee, Ill., admits to occasionally leaving her three youngsters buckled in their car seats while she runs into a bagel shop. She would never leave them in the minivan for more than a few minutes, she says, and she's certainly not the only well-intentioned parent who is reluctant to unload sleeping babies and haul them into the cold during a quick errand. The key is she always keeps a nervous eye on the kids through the store window, she says. Under a new Illinois law, parents who leave their children unattended and out of their view can face child endangerment charges that carry a penalty of up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.