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By Page Huidekoper Wilson | September 28, 1990
UNLESS immediate action is taken, by the year 2000 one-third of the world's children between 5 and 16 will be living on the street.Street children and the host of other problems facing children, including those in the United States, have prompted UNICEF, the United Nations children's fund, to organize a "World Summit for Children" this weekend in New York. President Bush is among 70 heads of state (probably the largest gathering of heads of state in history) committed to attend the first-ever PageHuidekoperWilsonworld conference on children.
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NEWS
By Cory L. Richards | November 4, 2007
Striving to find the "middle ground" on abortion - that is, coming up with ways acceptable to pro-choice and pro-life Americans alike to reduce the number of abortions in the United States - is a worthwhile undertaking. But it also has given rise to some fairly resilient myths about the best way to achieve this goal. Republican presidential candidate Rudolph W. Giuliani prominently featured one such myth in a recent speech to a group of social conservatives. The former New York City mayor stated that "we (the city)
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NEWS
By Michael Ollove | January 1, 1991
Growing up in the dreary English coal-mining town of Grimethorpe, Pamela Silver Tallant never fantasized about the American GI who had fathered her and then disappeared from her life.She contented herself with images of the homely U.S. soldier with the kindly smile in the yellowed photographs her mother had stored away. She enjoyed the rare occasions her mother would speak of this stranger she had once yearned to marry. He was "a lovely person, really," her mother would tell Pamela. "Well-liked by everyone."
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Lee Romney and Henry Weinstein and Lee Romney,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 23, 2005
LOS ANGELES - The California Supreme Court established yesterday broad custody rights and obligations for same-sex couples who raise children. In three cases, the justices set the rules in an area where changes in family structure and advances in technology have outpaced traditional legal principles. In each case, they upheld the tenet that children born to gay couples should have two legally recognized parents. Each of the cases involved a lesbian couple who had children then split up. In all three cases, custody disputes went to court.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | November 23, 1992
In the largest study of its kind to date, a University of Virginia psychologist has found that children born to or adopted by lesbians are psychologically healthy.The study involved 4- to 9-year-olds in 37 lesbian families from the San Francisco Bay Area. Although other studies have indicated that the children of gay parents show normal personal and emotional development, most of the earlier research has focused on children born to heterosexual couples in which either parent later came out of the closet.
NEWS
By Daniel T. Griswold | April 26, 1998
Americans have always been ambivalent, if not downright hostile, toward immigrants. Benjamin Franklin grumbled about all the German-speaking newcomers. The Irish, the Chinese, the Italians and the Slavs were all once seen as too "alien" to assimilate into American society. Today's immigration angst is just as mistaken.In coming weeks, Congress will wrestle with immigration legislation ranging from visas for high-skilled workers to permanent resident status for Haitian refugees. The political forces and factual arguments vary from issue to issue, but the fault line in the immigration debate remains the same: Are immigrants good or bad for America?
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Lee Romney and Henry Weinstein and Lee Romney,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 23, 2005
LOS ANGELES - The California Supreme Court established yesterday broad custody rights and obligations for same-sex couples who raise children. In three cases, the justices set the rules in an area where changes in family structure and advances in technology have outpaced traditional legal principles. In each case, they upheld the tenet that children born to gay couples should have two legally recognized parents. Each of the cases involved a lesbian couple who had children then split up. In all three cases, custody disputes went to court.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
Maryland has a smaller share of children living with unemployed parents than any other state, according to a national report on how children fare across America. But it ranks close to the bottom in low-birth-weight babies and infant mortality, with a greater percentage than most other states. "Kids Count 2002," an annual report of the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation, ranked Maryland 21st among states on 10 indicators of child well-being -- down from 19th place last year. The report is based largely on 1999 statistics, the last year for which the foundation says it can gather reliable national data.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 16, 1993
NEW YORK -- One of the infants in the sterile hospital room wailed disconsolately, frantically flailing its tiny arms and legs as children born to crack-using mothers often do. Next to her, at the Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, another child slept peacefully, her face sculpted in an angelic expression.The contrast seemed to confirm what everyone knows about cocaine-exposed babies. But contrary to such assumptions, hospital officials said it was the peaceful child, not the cranky one, whose mother had been using the drug.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With the debate over reducing the country's welfare rolls focusing renewed attention on the rising birthrate among unwed women, the Census Bureau reported yesterday that such births soared by more than 70 percent from 1983 to 1993.According to the bureau, 6.3 million children, or 27 percent of all children under the age of 18, lived in 1993 with a single parent who had never married, up from 3.7 million in 1983.The report showed that the annual increase in the number of children born out of wedlock slowed in the 1980s, but it also documented the sharp rise in these kinds of births over the last three decades.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
Maryland has a smaller share of children living with unemployed parents than any other state, according to a national report on how children fare across America. But it ranks close to the bottom in low-birth-weight babies and infant mortality, with a greater percentage than most other states. "Kids Count 2002," an annual report of the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation, ranked Maryland 21st among states on 10 indicators of child well-being -- down from 19th place last year. The report is based largely on 1999 statistics, the last year for which the foundation says it can gather reliable national data.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2000
Like many of the children in the huge hall at Martin's West in Baltimore County yesterday, Ashley Cirri had been in a hurry to be born. Apparently, the little girl had decided that 29 weeks was long enough. Her impatience meant she was born 11 weeks prematurely, weighing just under 3 pounds. So, like the many other children at the 10th annual reunion of Howard County General Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Ashley got her first glimpses of the world from the hospital's NICU. These days, the 7-year-old is the picture of health.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2000
Maryland's teen birth rate has declined for the seventh consecutive year, but the rate of decrease has slowed to about half that of the previous two years, state officials said yesterday. According to figures compiled by the state health department, 4.3 percent of girls ages 15 to 19 gave birth in 1998, the last year for which statistics are available. That marks a 20 percent drop from the 5.4 percent recorded in 1991, but only a slight decrease from 1997's 4.4 percent rate. At a State House news conference, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend interpreted the numbers in a generally positive way but said "we have to keep fighting."
NEWS
By Chevonn Payton and Chevonn Payton,Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 22, 1999
Understanding why your children fight may be as simple as understanding their birth order. A new book called "Birth Order Blues" (Owl/Henry Holt, $14.95) by child and family therapist Meri Wallace, is just the latest take on the issue that predicts children's behavior by the order in which they were born. Besides describing the characteristics of each child, Wallace's book also offers parents strategies of what to say and do if their kids are suffering from birth-order blues.
NEWS
By Daniel T. Griswold | April 26, 1998
Americans have always been ambivalent, if not downright hostile, toward immigrants. Benjamin Franklin grumbled about all the German-speaking newcomers. The Irish, the Chinese, the Italians and the Slavs were all once seen as too "alien" to assimilate into American society. Today's immigration angst is just as mistaken.In coming weeks, Congress will wrestle with immigration legislation ranging from visas for high-skilled workers to permanent resident status for Haitian refugees. The political forces and factual arguments vary from issue to issue, but the fault line in the immigration debate remains the same: Are immigrants good or bad for America?
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1997
For the Rogers family of Pasadena, the holidays -- and Christmas in particular -- are a time to celebrate the miracle of life.Yesterday delivered another chance for such a celebration.Benjamin Elijah Rogers was born just after 2 a.m. -- the second child in the Rogers clan to be born on Christmas Day and the sixth to be born on or near a holiday.By yesterday afternoon, proud parents Anna and Ronald Rogers were relaxing in their Anne Arundel County home with their seven children -- Benjamin included -- quietly celebrating the holiday and the birth of their third son.Their third daughter, Cecelia, was born on Christmas Day eight years ago."
NEWS
By George Rodrigue and George Rodrigue,Dallas Morning News | January 25, 1995
~TC ATLANTA -- Several times a day, 17-year-old Delvecchio Finley might tell a vulnerable young girl, "If you love me, you'll have sex with me."But the girl usually replies, "If you love me, why are you pressuring me to do something I don't want to do?" Whereupon her eighth-grade classmates cheer loudly.Delvecchio joins the celebration. He's just acting out a skit, part of what several experts call the nation's most successful program for preventing teen pregnancy.It's called "Postponing Sexual Involvement," and many analysts say it is the nation's most effective teen-pregnancy program.
NEWS
By JANET HELLER | August 25, 1992
Twenty pounds of physical perfection rests in my arms. Thelook and feel of my first grandchild is an earthly delight. I marvel at her form -- the tiny blue veins that fan out beneath the blush of her cheeks, the petal-like softness of her skin.It has been 26 years since a creature so small has slept in my home. This time, however, the burden of constant care is not mine. I sleep through the night in queenly fashion while the baby's mother, around whom I once danced in attendance, has her ear cocked, ready to jump when her infant sounds the alarm.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - In retrospect, Janine Swift had never been quite healthy. She didn't have much energy, rarely running or playing outdoors with other children, said her mother, Theresa, 41, of Collingswood, N.J."As a little girl, her hands sometimes used to tremble," her mother said, but doctors could offer no explanation. "We thought maybe she was just a nervous kid."There was nothing to warn of the latent disease that would suddenly attack her nervous system in March 1995, when Janine turned 16, a disease surprisingly common - yet unknown to many doctors - that is pushing scientists to the limits of microbiology.
NEWS
October 24, 1996
We must save politics from big moneyAfter the recent uproar over shady political contributions it has become clear to me that both parties are sickeningly guilty. While each party sanctimoniously points the finger of guilt at the other, the evidence is overwhelming that special interest groups can buy our political system regardless of which party is in power. For either party to deny its part in this problem is the epitome of hypocrisy.The solution to this mess is not the ''gotcha'' mentality embraced by hardcore political ideologues, but a realization that special interest money taints the entire process and all involved.
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