Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChildren At Risk
IN THE NEWS

Children At Risk

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 12, 2008
Areview of children's deaths in Baltimore reaffirms an ugly truth about life in the city: Children die more often from murder than traffic accidents or injuries or suicide. And most of those victims are teenagers. If anyone had doubts about the toll violence is taking on the city's youths, this report should set them straight. This is a deadly city for youngsters. The city Health Department's review of data from its child fatality review committee for 2002 to 2006 reinforces the need to promote and expand violence prevention programs such as Operation Safe Kids, which provides intensive services for and monitoring of teens who are at risk of becoming homicide victims.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 29, 2013
We want to thank reporter John Fritze for his article laying out the issue of out-of-pocket costs for child dental care insurance through the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange ("Advocates, insurers duel over cost of child dental coverage," March 21). The new rules by the Obama administration perhaps unintentionally eliminate the general principle of the Affordable Care Act that dental care is an essential health benefit for children. The new rule will permit pediatric dental insurance plans to charge a maximum of $1,000 per child in out-of-pocket costs and up to $2,000 for a family.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JOHN B. O'DONNELL and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JOHN B. O'DONNELL,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
There were warning signs in the months before 11-year-old Arthur Lee Wiley became deathy ill. The severely disabled boy was kept in bed so long he moaned in pain. He moaned in pain. He suffered a broken leg for reasons no one has ever determinde. By February 2002, his physician and child welfare workers had grown increasingly worried that the boy wasn't getting the care he needed at a group home for foster children in Randallstown. On March 4, the caseworkers asked other facilities to take Lee, who had cerebral palsy.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
The number of young children deemed at risk of lead poisoning in Maryland and nationwide expanded drastically Wednesday as a federal health agency declared it would effectively cut in half its threshold for diagnosing the environmental illness. Acknowledging mounting evidence that children can suffer lasting harm from ingesting even minute amounts of lead, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it would reduce the level at which it recommends that doctors, families and health authorities act to lower a child's exposure to the toxic metal.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2003
Noting last year's torture death of Ciara Jobes, a report filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore asserts that the city's Department of Social Services is "sitting on a time bomb" and is putting hundreds of supervised children at risk because of a lax approach and overburdened caseworkers. The report, filed by lawyers representing children in a class action lawsuit dating back almost two decades, criticized social service workers for failing to complete criminal background checks on many foster parents and for trying to "intimidate and coerce" caregivers into adopting children.
NEWS
By Andreas von Bubnoff and Andreas von Bubnoff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 12, 2004
Researchers say they have found a clue to why children die of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, by examining how the brain regulates gasping for air when it doesn't get enough oxygen. The finding, published last week in the journal Neuron, might one day help identify children at risk for the syndrome, the leading killer of U.S. children under the age of 1, said lead researcher Jan-Marino Ramirez of the University of Chicago. Some experts believe that children die of SIDS because they fail to gasp - or inhale - when they sleep on their stomach and don't get enough oxygen.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Staff Writer | January 23, 1994
William W. Purkey delivers a message that's as touchy-feely as a talk by hug guru Leo Buscaglia and as humorous as a monologue by David Letterman."Live to enjoy," "take time for each other" and "I'm a nacho chip and the world's a dip" are just a few of his refrains.But Dr. Purkey isn't the latest arrival on the book circuit or in the late-night TV wars. He's a university professor who travels around the country talking about a serious topic: children at risk of dropping out of school.Yesterday, he was at Aberdeen High School, speaking to more than 200 teachers, educators and Harford County officials about ways to encourage educational success among students.
NEWS
By Patrice Martin and Patrice Martin,Contributing Writer | May 26, 1992
You can hear the compassion in her voice, and you somehow know that her caring is sincere.It's a useful quality to have as the vice president of Community Services for United Way of Central Maryland.Marlene McLaurin's primary role at United Way is to target resources to meet needs, that is, match up dollars and human resources with the greatest needs. She directs the distribution of funds, allocating $11 to $12 million per year to 54 United Way agencies for their programs and services.The United Way provides funding to organization which provide direct services, like the YWCA and YMCA, the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, the House of Ruth, Parents Anonymous, the Association for Retarded Citizens, Meals on Wheels and programs for the elderly, handicapped and illiterate.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | December 23, 1999
WHEN my son was a boy, he loved the books about the Stupid Family. The Stupids did all sorts of stupid things, which the writer refreshingly described as, well, "stupid."The stories elicited gales of laughter from my child, who found delight, as we all do, in declaring a stupid thing stupid.President Clinton got elected on the force of such bluntness: "It's the economy, stupid," he said. I was reminded of the Stupids while watching a recent television talk show, CNN's "Both Sides," about children at risk.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Federal officials said yesterday that they had broken up a huge child-smuggling ring that preyed upon the desire of desperate illegal immigrants in the United States to be reunited with their children. The ring smuggled hundreds of children, from toddlers to teen-agers, into the country from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras at a cost of $5,000 each, the Immigration and Naturalization Service said. The agency said its agents arrested three suspected smugglers in Houston on Friday.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
Areview of children's deaths in Baltimore reaffirms an ugly truth about life in the city: Children die more often from murder than traffic accidents or injuries or suicide. And most of those victims are teenagers. If anyone had doubts about the toll violence is taking on the city's youths, this report should set them straight. This is a deadly city for youngsters. The city Health Department's review of data from its child fatality review committee for 2002 to 2006 reinforces the need to promote and expand violence prevention programs such as Operation Safe Kids, which provides intensive services for and monitoring of teens who are at risk of becoming homicide victims.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
Thirteen-year-old Josh Turner knows what it feels like to have kids make fun of him because of his weight. "I know I'm overweight," Josh said. "The kids at school give me a hard time so I tried a crash diet last year for about a week and that didn't work. But since then, I've lost about 20 pounds and kept it off." More than 9 million children ages 6 to 19 in the United States are obese and just as many more are at risk, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JOHN B. O'DONNELL and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JOHN B. O'DONNELL,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
There were warning signs in the months before 11-year-old Arthur Lee Wiley became deathy ill. The severely disabled boy was kept in bed so long he moaned in pain. He moaned in pain. He suffered a broken leg for reasons no one has ever determinde. By February 2002, his physician and child welfare workers had grown increasingly worried that the boy wasn't getting the care he needed at a group home for foster children in Randallstown. On March 4, the caseworkers asked other facilities to take Lee, who had cerebral palsy.
NEWS
By Andreas von Bubnoff and Andreas von Bubnoff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 12, 2004
Researchers say they have found a clue to why children die of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, by examining how the brain regulates gasping for air when it doesn't get enough oxygen. The finding, published last week in the journal Neuron, might one day help identify children at risk for the syndrome, the leading killer of U.S. children under the age of 1, said lead researcher Jan-Marino Ramirez of the University of Chicago. Some experts believe that children die of SIDS because they fail to gasp - or inhale - when they sleep on their stomach and don't get enough oxygen.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2003
More than 20 years ago, a Baltimore school counselor noticed something disturbing in a classroom: a 6-year-old boy was sticking tacks into his hands, calling himself ugly and stupid. As it turned out, the boy was a foster child who had been placed in the home of a violent alcoholic by the Baltimore Department of Social Services. Lifting up his shirt revealed that nearly every inch of his chest, back, arms and stomach was crisscrossed with scars. The child was placed in a psychiatric hospital, and his case inspired a 1984 class action lawsuit that resulted in a consent decree demanding a comprehensive overhaul of the city's dangerously mismanaged foster care system.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2003
Noting last year's torture death of Ciara Jobes, a report filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore asserts that the city's Department of Social Services is "sitting on a time bomb" and is putting hundreds of supervised children at risk because of a lax approach and overburdened caseworkers. The report, filed by lawyers representing children in a class action lawsuit dating back almost two decades, criticized social service workers for failing to complete criminal background checks on many foster parents and for trying to "intimidate and coerce" caregivers into adopting children.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
Poor children in Baltimore and across the nation are less likely to be identified as dyslexic at an early age and get the help they need to overcome their reading difficulties than children in middle-class families, according to an Abell Foundation report released recently. The report, written by former city school board member and education consultant Kalman R. Hettleman, calls for changes in federal laws that dictate how dyslexia is diagnosed. Hettleman's report also contends that the definition of dyslexia works against children from poor families.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2003
On Oct. 12, as her night shift neared, Kim Brathwaite faced a hard choice. Her baby sitter had not shown up, and to miss work might end her new position as assistant manager at a McDonald's in downtown Brooklyn. So she left her two children, 9 and 1, alone, trying to stay in touch by telephone. It turned out to be a disastrous decision. Someone, it seems, deliberately set fire to her apartment. Her children died. And within hours, Brathwaite was under arrest, charged with recklessly endangering her children.
NEWS
By Daniel Kleiner | May 25, 2003
THE BUSH administration's recent change of alert status to orange has reawakened confusion and concern about what people can and should do to increase their safety in the event of a terrorist attack. It has similarly revived the possibility that adults' reactions will negatively impact the children under their care. Striking the right balance is a struggle many of us face. That's why I'm not sending a gallon of water to school with my children. This decision seems to create some consternation in the schools that my children attend.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.