Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChildren And Youth
IN THE NEWS

Children And Youth

FEATURES
By Boston Globe | April 21, 1993
Jessica Chin, who is 7 and in second grade, doesn't go to bed before 9:30 p.m. and sometimes not until 11 p.m.Isn't that a little late for a 7-year-old?"
Advertisement
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | March 2, 1993
TWENTY-FIVE years ago this week the Kerner Commission, appointed by President Johnson after terrible riots in Detroit and Newark the year before, made its final report. Gov. Otto Kerner and his colleagues warned: "Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white -- separate and unequal."For the anniversary, the Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation has issued a massive report on what we must do about the miseries of our urban ghettoes -- the miseries that exploded again last year in the Los Angeles riots.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | January 8, 1993
Protecting children is sometimes easier said than done when it comes to the touchy issues of abuse, neglect, medical care and support.But Maryland's children and their families have the support of Advocates for Children and Youth, a nonprofit organization that works to improve education, health, family support and prevention services for children of all ages.Amy Blank, a public policy specialist for the 3-year-old advocacy organization, told members of the Carroll County Children's Council at a meeting in Westminster on Wednesday that preventing the problems children face should be dealt with at all levels of the community.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | December 3, 1992
If all goes well between local businesses and Carroll County' Youth Services Bureau, programs to help parents do a better job could be instituted in many workplaces throughout the county.George Giese, the Youth Services Bureau director, told members of the Carroll County Children's Council yesterday that his agency would meet with business people next month to discuss the idea."On Jan. 15, we have about 12 businesses from in the community that are coming to a meeting where we will talk about how we can service them at their places of business," Mr. Giese said.
NEWS
September 15, 1992
No matter how you cut it, paring the state's budget by half-billion dollars is bound to hurt. But some cuts can cause more lasting harm than others. Like many interest groups, advocates for children's programs have usually taken a line-in-the-sand approach, trying to fend off any cuts at all. This year, that tactic is unrealistic. The challenge facing advocates now is to help state officials sort out the least damaging alternatives.Where children are concerned, those choices are particularly important.
NEWS
April 5, 1992
The social disintegration of poor, inner-city nuclear families has left many children without either parent to care for them. They are the children of what are being called "zero-parent families," whose mothers and fathers are either unable or unwilling to take responsibility for their upbringing. These children live with relatives or family friends or with foster care families, changing addresses often, resentful at not having a "normal" home life and often failing in school.State and local social service agencies don't track such children a separate category, nor do school officials usually know which children are growing up in households where neither parent is present because kids are reluctant to admit they've been abandoned.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | March 23, 1992
Despite Maryland's relative prosperity, the well-being of children here lags behind the national average, a report being released today concludes.The children of Maryland were more likely than average to die in infancy, be killed as teen-agers or live with only one parent, the report says.Maryland was ranked 29th in children's welfare, even though the state's families with children have the nation's fifth-highest median income."Maryland has the opportunity to do so much more. We rank fifth in wealth.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | October 29, 1991
Safety checkup for HalloweenHALLOWEEN lurks. It's time to review some health and safety tips:* Masks can be unsafe and also uncomfortable. Non-toxic makeup is a good alternative when dressing up little ones.* Be sure costumes fit well. Children can trip over long skirts and capes and can get caps, scarfs, big sleeves and other trappings caught in doors and railings. Do a costume safety check before a child leaves home.* Be sure children are warned not to eat their loot until an adult has checked it. For this and other safety reasons, it's wise for an adult to go with children when they are trick-or-treating.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | July 25, 1991
O's tickets for kids:Hundreds of Baltimore youngsters will be going to Orioles games in the next month, courtesy of first baseman Glenn Davis. Nearly 3,200 tickets to games in July, August and September are being distributed to youngsters and their families through six programs to help children in need, said Myra Schein of the Mayor's Office of Children and Youth, which is distributing the tickets. Davis personally chose the agencies that would receive tickets, Schein said. They are Baltimore City Foster Care; Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Central Maryland and the Eastern Shore;The Door neighborhood center;Regional Institute for Children and Adolescents;Project RAISE mentoring program and the Court Appointed Special Advocates program.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | June 29, 1991
Baltimore's infant mortality rate rivals Third World countries. Too many of the city's children aren't vaccinated on time. Vision and hearing problems diagnosed in schools routinely go uncorrected. Lead-paint poisoning is common. Regular medical care is not."Baltimore's children are not healthy," concludes a two-year study released yesterday by Advocates for Children and Youth Inc., a statewide non-profit organization that does research and lobbying on behalf of children.To improve the health of thousands of Baltimore youngsters, government must redesign its health system so that it spends more to prevent disease and pays less to tend sick children, according to the report titled, "Baltimore's Unhealthy Children: Is There a Doctor in the House?"
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.