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Children And Youth

NEWS
March 8, 2009
HC DrugFree, a nonprofit organization that seeks to empower the Howard County community to raise drug-free children, will offer "Teen2Teen: Alcohol, Drugs and All in Between," a panel of young adults who will share their experiences with alcohol and other drugs, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. March 18 at Hammond High School, 8800 Guilford Road. The panelists will describe their lives and how they recovered from addictions, and answer questions. Registration is not required. Information: 443-325-0040.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
Letia Bennett and DeRay McKesson know that plenty of Baltimore youth do well in school and steer clear of trouble. But the teen-agers worry about their peers who have had scrapes with the law, are using or selling drugs, or have become parents. So tomorrow, Letia and DeRay, both 16, will participate in Youth Explosion 2001 in hopes of finding solutions to many of the problems that can envelop youth. One thousand people are expected to attend the second annual event, which targets ages 13 to 21 and will be held at the Baltimore Convention Center from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Highlights will include a Peace Walk, which will begin at 3:30 p.m. "The purpose of the Peace Walk is to show unity among young people in Baltimore City," said Lamarr Darnell Shields, who organized the event with Darlene Walker and David Miller.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | October 29, 1991
Safety checkup for HalloweenHALLOWEEN lurks. It's time to review some health and safety tips:* Masks can be unsafe and also uncomfortable. Non-toxic makeup is a good alternative when dressing up little ones.* Be sure costumes fit well. Children can trip over long skirts and capes and can get caps, scarfs, big sleeves and other trappings caught in doors and railings. Do a costume safety check before a child leaves home.* Be sure children are warned not to eat their loot until an adult has checked it. For this and other safety reasons, it's wise for an adult to go with children when they are trick-or-treating.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1996
Local government leaders announced yesterday that they want to form a new quasi-public agency to better coordinate and manage social services for children, youth and families in Howard County.In a pre-kindergarten room at Columbia's Running Brook Elementary School yesterday afternoon, county officials, including County Executive Charles Ecker, said they plan to form the Local Children's Board for Children and Youth Services.The board would more easily help children who have learning disabilities, behavior problems or other special needs get the attention they need, said Nancy Weber, executive director of county hospice services and chairwoman of the board's planning panel.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | May 21, 2008
Advocates for better foster care say they are worried that the state is not moving fast enough to find new foster families and move away from group homes, which critics say cost more and do not always meet neglected and abused children's needs. A status report released yesterday by Advocates for Children and Youth says that since June 2007, the state has gained 89 new families. The Department of Human Resources, which oversees foster care statewide, set a goal in November of signing up 1,000 new families by 2010.
NEWS
July 1, 1996
THE INTERNATIONAL Youth Foundation, opening a headquarters and holding its annual board meeting here this week, is a welcome arrival that strengthens Baltimore as a center of nongovernment organizations providing aid to the world.The young international charity, a six-year-old start-up by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation of Battle Creek, Mich., promotes services for children and youth worldwide. It joins an array here including the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, a foremost improver of health; Catholic Relief Services, one of the largest non-government providers of food and emergency assistance; the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the largest maker of grants to services for children and youth in the United States, and the Weinberg Foundation with its emphasis on the poor and poor children.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | January 8, 1993
Protecting children is sometimes easier said than done when it comes to the touchy issues of abuse, neglect, medical care and support.But Maryland's children and their families have the support of Advocates for Children and Youth, a nonprofit organization that works to improve education, health, family support and prevention services for children of all ages.Amy Blank, a public policy specialist for the 3-year-old advocacy organization, told members of the Carroll County Children's Council at a meeting in Westminster on Wednesday that preventing the problems children face should be dealt with at all levels of the community.
NEWS
By Ben Meyerson and Ben Meyerson,Capital News Service | January 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Maryland had the lowest percentage of children younger than 5 living in poverty of any of the United States in 2005, according to new estimates from the Census Bureau. The survey said 12.2 percent of children younger than 5 lived below the poverty line in Maryland, compared with a national average of 21.3 percent, according to a survey released by the Census Bureau's Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates program. Maryland also had the second-lowest overall poverty rate in the nation, as well as the second-highest median household income, according to the survey.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | March 23, 1992
Despite Maryland's relative prosperity, the well-being of children here lags behind the national average, a report being released today concludes.The children of Maryland were more likely than average to die in infancy, be killed as teen-agers or live with only one parent, the report says.Maryland was ranked 29th in children's welfare, even though the state's families with children have the nation's fifth-highest median income."Maryland has the opportunity to do so much more. We rank fifth in wealth.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
America's Promise - The Alliance for Youth has chosen Howard County as a winner of its first national competition to identify "100 Best Communities for Young People." Winning communities, from small towns to urban neighborhoods, are being celebrated for their commitment to providing healthy, safe and caring environments for youth. Howard County was selected in part for its dedication to education and its collaboration with community programs for children and youth. Entries were evaluated based on five "promises" deemed crucial to the well-being of young people: Caring adults who are actively involved in their lives; safe places in which to learn and grow; a healthy start toward adulthood; an effective education that builds marketable skills; and opportunities to help others.
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