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NEWS
By Rosemary King Johnston | March 22, 2010
M aryland is at the forefront of a nationally recognized "system of care" innovation that ensures vulnerable children and families have access to services in their communities. The role of local management boards (LMBs) and changes that have been proposed need to be understood in this context. There has been much discussion about the value of LMBs, along with many comments and recommendations about proposed changes to the LMB operating structure as outlined in the fiscal 2011 budget, which includes more than $15 million in funding for community-based services and programs for children, youth and their families.
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NEWS
By Lynn Van Natta and Mark Van Natta | January 15, 2013
We adopted two Russian children, a 7-month-old girl in 1998 and three years later a 10-month-old boy. In addition, we have an older biological daughter. We chose Russia because we wanted to adopt an infant who shared our European heritage. The adoption process was long and challenging, and there were many times where it was difficult to maintain the commitment needed to work through all the paperwork, background checks, visits with social workers, medical evaluations and inspections of our home.
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NEWS
January 3, 2007
They open early, close late and help lots of children and families in the intervening hours. Baltimore's 26 publicly funded, specially targeted community schools are linking families with needed services, while also advancing educational progress. It's a concept that should be embraced by more schools, but additional support from the city and the school system is needed. The idea of integrating community services in schools dates back more than a century and has been reinvigorated in recent years from New York to Chicago to San Francisco to Portland, Ore., as the social needs of some students have forced schools to deal with obstacles to learning such as hunger and lack of health care.
NEWS
By Rosemary King Johnston | March 22, 2010
M aryland is at the forefront of a nationally recognized "system of care" innovation that ensures vulnerable children and families have access to services in their communities. The role of local management boards (LMBs) and changes that have been proposed need to be understood in this context. There has been much discussion about the value of LMBs, along with many comments and recommendations about proposed changes to the LMB operating structure as outlined in the fiscal 2011 budget, which includes more than $15 million in funding for community-based services and programs for children, youth and their families.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | August 16, 1991
MARYLANDERS are invited to celebrate children and families this weekend at the state's first Kids' Convention at Towson State University.With a flourish of entertainment, activities for children and programs for parents, the convention hopes to promote education, spotlight services for families and present a forum for the exchange of ideas on family issues. The convention is sponsored by the Governor's Office of Children, Youth and Families and area businesses.Children's activities include a variety of art projects, displays by the Baltimore Zoo and the National Aquarium and hands-on exhibits from the Maryland Science Center.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
Nonprofits helping disadvantaged children and families in Baltimore will get continuing aid in 1997 from a national charity that moved here two years ago.The Annie E. Casey Foundation has announced it will award a second year of $700,000 in grants to support children's services here.Gifts ranging from $2,000 to $20,000 will help programs in health care, education, job training, counseling, violence prevention, recreation, cultural arts and child care.The foundation, at 701 St. Paul St., will give $400,000 to up to 30 new applicants and $300,000 to 44 agencies that received a total of $698,000 for their work in 1996.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2001
Concerned about the rising number of children who are removed from their homes and placed in foster care or a correctional facility, Carroll County officials are fashioning a program that will provide a range of services to troubled youths. The program, called Families ETC. -- or Families Empowered Through Connections -- will be funded by a state grant. The Governor's Office for Children, Youth and Families has pledged $250,000 a year to the initiative for each of the next five years. Details of the program, which organizers hope to launch in January, have to be worked out between state and Carroll officials, but county leaders envision case coordinators matching families with needed services -- from individual counseling to family therapy and mediation.
NEWS
By Sandra J. Skolnik | September 28, 2003
IN EVERY corner of Maryland, there are families who struggle each day to go to work and afford quality child care. Parents want the best environment for their young children, but for many families, good child care is simply too expensive. Their child-care arrangements are often unstable and they don't know how they will go to work if those arrangements fall apart. Maryland's 12 regional Child Care Resource Centers, which operate under a state contract administered by the nonprofit Maryland Committee for Children, see families face these questions daily.
NEWS
October 5, 1993
FROM "FOCUS," the quarterly report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation for disadvantaged children:"Thirteen years ago Congress set out to realign the policy framework for the nation's child welfare system. The Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-272), a fundamental reorientation of the nation's protective service systems, encouraged states to stabilize vulnerable, crisis-ridden families rather than rely so readily on removal to foster care as the primary means of securing the welfare of an at-risk child."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | November 24, 2007
Sandra "Sandy" Skolnik ardently believed the young children of working parents needed to learn something new and worthwhile every day. In the past three decades, she became a determined and articulate advocate for quality child care and education for the very young. The longtime executive director of the Maryland Committee for Children died of lung cancer Wednesday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 69 and lived in Mount Washington. "She was a visionary and a pioneer," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
FEATURES
By Jeannine Stein and Tribune Newspapers | February 15, 2010
Most kids like sweets, but for some children there may be an underlying cause for that affinity. A new study finds there may be a link between sweet preference in children and a family history of alcoholism, plus the child's feelings of depression. Researchers from Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia studied 300 children ages 5 to 12. They were placed into groups according to a family history of alcoholism (based on a parent, sibling, aunt, uncle or grandparent who had a diagnosis of alcoholism)
NEWS
By Tiesha Higgins and Tiesha Higgins,Special to The Sun | December 2, 2007
There are African-American children in the Baltimore foster-care system waiting for a loving family. Nearly 1,000, as a matter of fact. So finding the right match is critical. That's why an alliance of local churches is strengthening its recruitment and support of prospective families as part of One Church, One Child, a nonprofit national organization that serves as a liaison to connect potential adoptive parents with the Department of Social Services. More than 248 children have found permanent homes through One Church, One Child since the organization opened offices in Maryland in 1988, and more than 50 percent of that number are from Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | November 24, 2007
Sandra "Sandy" Skolnik ardently believed the young children of working parents needed to learn something new and worthwhile every day. In the past three decades, she became a determined and articulate advocate for quality child care and education for the very young. The longtime executive director of the Maryland Committee for Children died of lung cancer Wednesday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 69 and lived in Mount Washington. "She was a visionary and a pioneer," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | October 30, 2007
Mary C. Maffezzoli, a retired social worker and former administrator at St. Vincent's Center in Timonium, where she worked diligently trying to make better lives for the abused and neglected children who lived there, died of pancreatic cancer Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 64. The former Mary Concetta Cellini was born and raised in Trenton, N.J.
NEWS
January 3, 2007
They open early, close late and help lots of children and families in the intervening hours. Baltimore's 26 publicly funded, specially targeted community schools are linking families with needed services, while also advancing educational progress. It's a concept that should be embraced by more schools, but additional support from the city and the school system is needed. The idea of integrating community services in schools dates back more than a century and has been reinvigorated in recent years from New York to Chicago to San Francisco to Portland, Ore., as the social needs of some students have forced schools to deal with obstacles to learning such as hunger and lack of health care.
NEWS
By P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2006
CHICAGO -- When Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich signed it last winter, the All Kids program was heralded as the nation's most ambitious plan to ensure that all children would have access to health insurance, regardless of their immigration status. Now, as the program's benefits began to roll out this week, thousands of families and doctors are wondering whether the broad-reaching effort will live up to its promise. State officials said the legislation is designed to provide medical, dental and vision visits and prescription drug coverage to those age 18 and younger whose working-class families can't afford private insurance but earn too much to qualify for Medicaid.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1990
Buoyed by the success of a two-year experiment in Prince George's County, the state is prepared to launch a revolutionary reform movement in several of its social service jurisdictions, including Baltimore and Baltimore County.The expanded pilot program, funded primarily through the state, will attempt to keep children out of costly out-of-home placements, such as foster care, by providing intensive services to troubled families.This change represents Maryland's attempt to rethink the foster care system, which was designed for the children and families of an earlier, far different era. The result, if successful, would be a cost-efficient program that keeps families together, its supporters say."
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | May 5, 1996
CAN A BROKEN system right itself? Maryland may provide an answer in its effort to reform the state's services for children and families. Over the past few years, the legislature has passed a series of laws requiring such changes as sharing funds between departments and agencies and the development of management boards in each jurisdiction to foster local control of these programs.At least initially, the effort is focusing on attempts to keep families together and reduce the number of children in foster care and other out-of-home placements.
NEWS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Young-chan Han sees her own childhood reflected in the lives of immigrant children and families in Howard County. Han was 13 when the rest of her family joined her father in Maryland after he emigrated from Korea several years earlier. While she and her siblings picked up English and assimilated to their new country, Han's parents were busy providing for the family. "We never saw our parents; we were on our own," Han recalled. "Pretty typical" of many immigrant families. That experience led Han to her life's mission -- working with the minority population.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
WADE HORN, President Bush's marriage promoter, doesn't just want regular Americans to tie the knot and stick with it. He wants the federal workers who serve those Americans to live happily ever after, too. Horn, assistant secretary at the Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families, is expanding a marriage education pilot program to 10 of the department's regional offices after employees at its Washington headquarters participated...
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