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Childhood Memory

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By Rus VanWestervelt | May 5, 2014
Timonium resident and poet Ann Kolakowski says that what she discovered when her grandmother turned 99 has haunted her to this day. Now, nearly 12 years later, she has published a book of poetry about that discovery. "When my brothers and I were clearing out our grandmother's home when she moved to an assisted living facility," said Kolakowski, "I found a shabby notebook. I opened it and read, 'Marian Brown, Domestic Science/Warren School, Maryland.' I was really confused. " In fact, the town in which her grandmother, Florence Marian Brown Eichler, had spent her childhood and attended Warren School had been bought, razed and flooded in 1921 to create a municipal water supply.
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NEWS
By Rus VanWestervelt | May 5, 2014
Timonium resident and poet Ann Kolakowski says that what she discovered when her grandmother turned 99 has haunted her to this day. Now, nearly 12 years later, she has published a book of poetry about that discovery. "When my brothers and I were clearing out our grandmother's home when she moved to an assisted living facility," said Kolakowski, "I found a shabby notebook. I opened it and read, 'Marian Brown, Domestic Science/Warren School, Maryland.' I was really confused. " In fact, the town in which her grandmother, Florence Marian Brown Eichler, had spent her childhood and attended Warren School had been bought, razed and flooded in 1921 to create a municipal water supply.
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NEWS
August 6, 2013
The passing of Baltimore Colt great Art Donovan ( "Beloved player known for his grit and his wit," Aug. 5) brought back a special childhood memory. Growing up on Pinewood Avenue in northeast Baltimore, I had the good fortune to live across the street from "Artie. " On more than one occasion, I would have one of my parents cross me over to his house. I then knocked on his front door and asked this bona fide NFL star on a world championship team to play football with me in his backyard.
NEWS
August 6, 2013
The passing of Baltimore Colt great Art Donovan ( "Beloved player known for his grit and his wit," Aug. 5) brought back a special childhood memory. Growing up on Pinewood Avenue in northeast Baltimore, I had the good fortune to live across the street from "Artie. " On more than one occasion, I would have one of my parents cross me over to his house. I then knocked on his front door and asked this bona fide NFL star on a world championship team to play football with me in his backyard.
FEATURES
By Barbara Turk | December 25, 1990
Santa Claus didn't treat your little one very well this year. What he/she most wanted he didn't receive. Perhaps it was a too-expensive present, or a cherished wish, such as having an absentee family member be there for Christmas.You tried to tell him Santa might not bring what he wanted. But he believed Santa would, and now he's disappointed and disillusioned, wondering how Santa could have let him down. You feel terrible. What can you do or say to make things better?It's hard to know your child is hurting and feels helpless to change things.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
The Colts left Baltimore when I was 6 years old, just a kid. The Ravens did not arrive until I was a sophomore in college. I was excited that Baltimore had an NFL team, but my enthusiasm was quelled by the fact that I grew up without a hometown football team. My formative years were spent rooting for the Orioles. I can still recall trips to Memorial Stadium during childhood as if they were yesterday. Once, my parents tricked my sister and me into believing that we were going to visit our "Aunt Birdie" on a Sunday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J WYNN ROUSUCK | August 13, 1993
"Camera Obscura"When: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 7 p.m. Sundays; through Aug. 22Where: AXIS Theatre, 3600 Clipper Mill RoadTickets: $8 and $9Call: (410) 243-5237*** "What I remember didn't happen, and what happened, I don't remember," says the protagonist in K. Siobhan Wright's "Camera Obscura," AXIS Theatre's second production in the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.The reliability of memory -- particularly childhood memory -- is one of the more intriguing issues in this domestic drama, which is set during the emotionally charged Christmas season.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 26, 1995
The exhibit of Michelle La Perriere's accomplished paintings and drawings, now at Goucher, deals with how memory intrudes upon and mingles with the present. The past and present are combined in the same image in layered fashion, so that the viewer sees both at the same time. This may sound like gimmickry, but in La Perriere's hands it not only works, it communicates. You not only enjoy her paintings, they activate your own memory.One of the best of these is "Nimbus," a painting in which the protagonist (unseen, as usual)
NEWS
By Kate Pipkin | September 1, 1993
FOR A long time I forgot about my grandmother's house -- one of thousands of rowhomes that stretch so tightly across Baltimore's inner city. It took the intangible essence of noise on a hot, breathless August night to bring forth a childhood memory -- a memory that has influenced my adult life much more than I ever realized.This trickle of memory was actually prompted by a simple inconvenience: the central air conditioning in my apartment died. The landlord said it would be several days before he could get it repaired.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 20, 1997
At first glance, it looks as if Sujata Massey shamelessly spurned the time-tested writing advice to "write what you know."First, the British-born Baltimorean set her new mystery, "The Salaryman's Wife" (HarperCollins, $5.99), in modern-day Japan. Second, Massey, whose mother is German and father is Indian, created a heroine who struggles with her Japanese-American cultural identity. And, in the ultimate affront to the traditional method, she wrote in the first person."No, I didn't really follow that advice," Massey admits, sipping tea in her fastidiously decorated Roland Park home during a rare break from a cross-country promotional tour of her first, warmly received book.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 18, 2013
Just when we were getting our heads around the idea that many (if not most) of us will lose brain function as we age, there is news that another one of those physical gifts we take for granted is likely to leave us. Our sense of smell. It is a bit of a blow, if you will excuse the pun. And it joins a growing list: balance, flexibility, muscle mass, strength, vision, hearing and hair, to name just a handful of the things the young take for granted. The Wall Street Journal reported last week that our sense of smell degrades as we age, reducing both pleasure and safety.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
The Colts left Baltimore when I was 6 years old, just a kid. The Ravens did not arrive until I was a sophomore in college. I was excited that Baltimore had an NFL team, but my enthusiasm was quelled by the fact that I grew up without a hometown football team. My formative years were spent rooting for the Orioles. I can still recall trips to Memorial Stadium during childhood as if they were yesterday. Once, my parents tricked my sister and me into believing that we were going to visit our "Aunt Birdie" on a Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2009
Rosie Ahern of Willits, Calif., was looking for a recipe for pineapple squares that she remembers from her childhood. Her mother, who baked bread on a weekly basis, came across the recipe on a package of Fleischmann's yeast. Barbara Davis of Salisbury sent in the recipe she believes is likely the one Ahern was searching for. The photocopy she sent in appears to be from a magazine advertisement for Fleischmann's yeast. She says she has had it since it was published back in the 1950s and it is still a favorite with her family today.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | March 9, 2008
This column explores a highly entertaining subject: the difference between choking and coughing. Sometimes in Janet's World we must take the unlikely, potentially controversial subject and pursue it purely for the sake of The Sun copy editors downtown. These former English majors have to read a lot of stories about depressing news events, and painstakingly check them for accuracy and integrity. Late in the week, the Janet's World column comes across their desks, and all of their training goes out the window.
NEWS
By Gregory Lewis | February 4, 2004
GROWING OLD in the same town where you grew up means accommodating the ghosts of what used to be. Willy-nilly, a chance encounter with this or that place can spontaneously provoke a sense of dM-ijM-` vu. For instance, while visiting the new Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center, a 244,000- square-foot detention and administrative facility downtown on a blighted block of Gay Street, I kept trying to fix the exact spot where day-old pastries were sold...
NEWS
By Aron Davidowitz and Aron Davidowitz,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
What if you could own artwork representing someone's childhood memory? This weekend, at the School 33 Art Center, you could get a chance to do just that. Area artists have contributed drawings, sculptures, photographs and other forms of art depicting their holiday recollections for the Sell Your Childhood Memories exhibit and auction. The art will be offered for sale in a silent auction. The display of works in School 33's second-floor gallery will be complemented by a collection of obsolete electric toys, says curator Gary Kachadourian.
FEATURES
By Susan M. Barbieri and Susan M. Barbieri,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 23, 1994
If you have ever wondered why you can't remember a thing that happened to you before age 3, whether some people really can recall being born, or whether your baby is quietly storing and remembering events of early life, a University of Minnesota researcher may have some answers.For the past eight years, associate professor Patricia Bauer and her colleagues at the Institute of Child Development have followed hundreds of children from infancy through early childhood to track human memory development.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2009
Rosie Ahern of Willits, Calif., was looking for a recipe for pineapple squares that she remembers from her childhood. Her mother, who baked bread on a weekly basis, came across the recipe on a package of Fleischmann's yeast. Barbara Davis of Salisbury sent in the recipe she believes is likely the one Ahern was searching for. The photocopy she sent in appears to be from a magazine advertisement for Fleischmann's yeast. She says she has had it since it was published back in the 1950s and it is still a favorite with her family today.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2002
Come December, groups of friends, colleagues and relatives gather to share the fruits of many kitchens, divvying up dozens of homemade gingerbreads, bars, drops and jumbles for each participant's respective household and gift list. While the holiday cookie exchange has become an increasingly popular tradition, it appears to have no specific point of origin. "My suspicion is that cookie exchanges have been happening unofficially within families for generations," says Lucy Long, chairwoman of the foodways section of the American Folklore Society and assistant professor of popular culture at Bowling Green State University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | March 28, 1999
The voice on the voice mail was a familiar one, my husband's, and the message was the one he always leaves: Call me when you get a chance. Not: "Have you heard the news, call me!" -- the life-shortening message he left the day the Yankees traded David Wells for Roger Clemens. Just: "Call me when you get a chance."I got a chance."I broke your labyrinth," he said, without preamble. "I'm sorry. I was dusting, and I knocked it over. I don't think it can be fixed.""Oh," I said. And then I didn't say anything for a very long time.
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