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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 28, 2005
House passes measure on child lead poisoning Members of the House of Delegates passed a measure Saturday that would allow earlier intervention to prevent childhood lead poisoning and to require landlords to clean up lead problems. The House unanimously supported the measure, which is one of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s legislative priorities this session. The governor has joined a nationwide effort to eliminate childhood lead poisoning by 2010. The bill now goes to the Senate for consideration, where it is expected to have support.
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NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | August 11, 2007
A city jury has found that the Housing Authority of Baltimore City should pay $4 million in damages to two siblings poisoned by lead paint in their publicly owned rowhouse in the 1980s. The verdict - issued Thursday - directed $2.5 million to Joseph Avery Jr., 23, of the 3000 block of Rosedale Court and $1.5 million to his sister, Lisa Avery, 21, of the 1700 block of McCulloh St. The family filed suit against the housing authority in 2005. The damages could be reduced to a maximum of $350,000 for each sibling under the state payment caps in place at the time they were tested for lead poisoning, said J. Marks Moore III, the attorney for the housing authority's insurance company.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2005
Despite promoting a statewide campaign to end childhood lead poisoning, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has eliminated funding for one of Baltimore's lead-paint programs in his budget. City fiscal analysts informed Mayor Martin O'Malley and Baltimore legislators about the loss of $375,000 in funding during meetings yesterday. The money paid for city employees to enforce compliance with lead-paint regulations. "In the `year of the child' when lead paint, we're told, is a top priority, the governor has cut our budget," O'Malley said.
NEWS
October 1, 2006
Since the early 1990s, there has been a dramatic decline in the number of lead-poisoned children in Maryland. Instead of 14,000 children testing positive annually for lead, the number fell to less than 10 percent of that last year. It's a great public health success story, particularly for lead paint-plagued Baltimore, where improving standardized test scores in elementary schools may have as much to do with the reduction in childhood lead poisoning as any school-based reforms. But the job is not yet complete.
NEWS
By Susan G. Dunn | April 2, 1992
WHEN THE federal government outlawed the widespread use of lead paint in 1978, many Americans may have thought lead paint poisoning went away. It didn't. Thick layers of lead paint cover the walls in 75 percent of houses built before the late '70s, according to a 1990 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development report.The Centers for Disease Control calls lead poisoning the most serious environmental threat to children. Even low levels of lead in children can cause life-long learning and behavioral problems.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
Columbia has become the headquarters for a national campaign to reduce childhood lead poisoning.The National Center for Lead-Safe Housing, in the American City Building in Town Center, opened in October with a $5.5 million grant from the Fannie Mae Foundation, which contributes to projects to improve the nation's stock of affordable housing.The center is a collaborative effort between the Columbia-based Enterprise Foundation, formed by James Rouse 10 years ago to help develop low-income housing projects nationwide, and the Washington-based Alliance To End Childhood Lead Poisoning.
NEWS
October 1, 2006
Since the early 1990s, there has been a dramatic decline in the number of lead-poisoned children in Maryland. Instead of 14,000 children testing positive annually for lead, the number fell to less than 10 percent of that last year. It's a great public health success story, particularly for lead paint-plagued Baltimore, where improving standardized test scores in elementary schools may have as much to do with the reduction in childhood lead poisoning as any school-based reforms. But the job is not yet complete.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | March 15, 1997
The Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill yesterday that would restrict tenant rights to withhold rent when lead-paint hazards endanger children's health.About 1,200 Maryland children younger than age 6 suffered lead poisoning in 1995, risking learning and other problems after ingesting lead-paint flakes or dust in older housing.The bill, sought by landlords in Baltimore and the rest of the state, passed 42 to 1. A similar bill is pending in the House.The measure originally would have repealed a 1976 law under which a tenant could withhold rent and pay it to a District Court until the landlord removed lead paint.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
A group that fights lead poisoning said yesterday that it will work with Baltimore police to train children, parents and police officers how to detect and prevent the childhood hazard."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | February 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Ambitious federal plans for combating childhood lead poisoning are under attack from lawmakers, environmentalists and health advocates because the Bush administration intends to spend only a fraction of what it says is needed to deal with the problem.Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan unveiled a 5-year "strategic plan" yesterday aimed at eliminating lead poisoning, which he called the "No. 1 environmental hazard facing our children."The plan, which officials estimate will cost nearly $1 billion, calls for expanded screening of children, removing deteriorating lead-based paint from older homes and apartments, and reducing other exposures to the toxic metal.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 28, 2005
House passes measure on child lead poisoning Members of the House of Delegates passed a measure Saturday that would allow earlier intervention to prevent childhood lead poisoning and to require landlords to clean up lead problems. The House unanimously supported the measure, which is one of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s legislative priorities this session. The governor has joined a nationwide effort to eliminate childhood lead poisoning by 2010. The bill now goes to the Senate for consideration, where it is expected to have support.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2005
Despite promoting a statewide campaign to end childhood lead poisoning, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has eliminated funding for one of Baltimore's lead-paint programs in his budget. City fiscal analysts informed Mayor Martin O'Malley and Baltimore legislators about the loss of $375,000 in funding during meetings yesterday. The money paid for city employees to enforce compliance with lead-paint regulations. "In the `year of the child' when lead paint, we're told, is a top priority, the governor has cut our budget," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
State officials issued a complaint and imposed $100,000 in penalties yesterday against an inspector in the Baltimore City Health Department's lead poisoning program for violating the state's lead laws at four city houses he owns and rents. State and city records show that Ali Sardorizadeh bought three of the houses from owners after citing them for lead violations. Sardorizadeh, who also goes by the name of Amin Sardaryzadeh, was notified in 1998 of lead violations at some of his rental properties and has yet to address them, said Jonas A. Jacobson, director of the Maryland Department of the Environment's Waste Management Administration, which oversees the state's lead program.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
Dust and paint main causes of lead poisoning As long-time lead poisoning prevention professionals, we read with interest the editorial "False security" (April 24). That editorial made two salient points: that recent research suggests there is no safe level of lead for young children, and that lead in drinking water, although a real problem, is actually secondary to the primary problem of lead in paint and dust, which contaminates thousands of residential properties in our community. We congratulate The Sun for placing the emphasis where it belongs - on the health of young children and the continuing problem of lead in paint and dust - while pointing out the failure of the school system to control its lead-in-water problem, which certainly may contribute to childhood lead poisoning.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
When his family moved into their rented rowhouse in Northeast Baltimore last June, Cameron Roberts was an active 1-year-old with a ready smile and a two-word vocabulary: "Mama" and "no." Five months later, he lay in the intensive care ward at Kennedy Krieger Institute with a potentially lethal dose of lead in his bloodstream - poisoned, his family now believes, by dust and flakes from the lead-based paint that riddled his home. A month's worth of painful injections probably saved the toddler's life, doctors say. But the lead, which lingers in his system, left him in danger of lifelong difficulties with learning and behavior.
NEWS
January 3, 2000
LEAD paint poisoning makes a mockery of the city's effort to improve chlidren's reading scores. Even microscopic bits of lead in the human bloodstream impairs development of cognitive ability -- the ability to read, the ability to think, to reason and to control violent impulses. Once burrowed into brain, bone and other organ tissue, impairments are permanent. The only cure is prevention. In Baltimore, 31.6 percent of children tested have dangerously high levels of lead poisoning. That's more than seven times the national average of 4.4 percent.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1997
The General Assembly gave final approval yesterday to a controversial bill restricting tenants' rights to withhold rent when lead-paint endangers their children's health. Children's advocates have said they would urge Gov. Parris N. Glendening to veto the measure.By a 37-10 vote, the Senate decided to alter a 1976 law under which tenants can pay rent into a District Court escrow account until landlords remove lead-based paint. The House earlier approved the same measure, which had been sought by landlords from throughout Maryland.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,STAFF WRITER | February 23, 1996
A Baltimore judge toughened Maryland's new lead-paint regulations yesterday, ruling that young children in older rental housing need to be protected from exposure to toxic paint dust when even minor repair work is performed on their homes.Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan struck down two provisions intended to help landlords save costs, saying a court cannot permit "baseless and potentially dangerous regulations."But the judge rejected claims by lawyers for Baltimore tenants that the rules overall were lax and illegally adopted by the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Geri Hastings and Geri Hastings,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 1998
KATHY PARRISH always dreamed of being a teacher. She remembers playing "school" as a child, and always choosing to be the teacher.Growing up, she moved from Bushy Park Elementary to Glenwood Middle School to Glenelg High, and her dream persisted.And when she graduated from college and signed a teaching contract with Howard County, her dream came true.Parrish now teaches at Elkridge Landing Middle School in Elkridge. And what a teacher she has become.At the end of her first year of teaching at Elkridge Landing, she was one of two Howard County teachers honored with the state Sallie Mae First Class Teacher Award.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
A group that fights lead poisoning said yesterday it would work with Baltimore police to train children, parents and police officers how to detect and prevent the childhood hazard."
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