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By Barbara Mallonee | November 23, 1995
AFFECTION IS an aimless thing, lighting its way across the landscape of childhood, more shine than beam.How else to account for a term of endearment like ''pumpkin?'' From a dark rumble of voices above, a hand, waving genially, would descend, brisker than a benediction, squashing a velvet hair ribbon flat. ''Hello, pumpkin!'' was even better than ''honey'' or ''sweetheart'' or ''buster.'' ''Pumpkin'' was pure gesture, jolly, dismissive; it required no answering back.Reluctant to be seen or heard, children in my neighborhood got ourselves dismissed from any table as fast as we possibly could.
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NEWS
March 31, 2014
Reporter Meredith Cohn 's recent article about the World Health Organization's new sugar recommendations highlighted the concerns of medical and public health experts over the epidemic of childhood obesity ( "Officials urge consumers to cut back on sugar," March 21). Sugar in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages is in fact the leading contributor to the obesity epidemic. According to the Institute of Medicine's 2012 report, a full 20 percent of the nation's weight increase since 1977 can be directly attributed to sugary drinks like soda, sports drinks, energy drinks and sweetened juices and teas.
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FEATURES
Susan Reimer | May 9, 2012
Not everything in childhood is bowls of mush and little old ladies whispering "Hush," and Maurice Sendak understood that. Our children understand that, too. Instinctively. That's what makes his books, like "Where the Wild Things Are" and "In the Night Kitchen" such a delicious experience for them. They could feel that frisson of fear and adventure without ever leaving the crook of Mommy's arm. This was especially true for our sons, who found kindred spirts in the unruly little boys of Sendak's stories.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
When a home has been the center of a happy childhood, it can often be reincarnated to represent a happy and hopeful future. This is the case with Mike and Jocelyn Szymanowski's Canton rowhouse. "The home has been in our family for over 41 years," said Jocelyn Szymanowski, a 35-year-old attorney. "Mike was raised in this home from the time he was 3 years old, and now we are raising our boys [Landon, 21/2, and Logan, 8 months] in the same home. " But not before the arduous task of renovation that began in 2005 when the couple moved out for more than a year and a half to make way for the demolition.
NEWS
By RON HOLLANDER and RON HOLLANDER,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
In northern Israel, a shining-faced little girl with her curly hair in pigtails writes not on a customary blackboard, nor in a school notebook, but on the lethally armored nose of a heavy artillery shell. Her half-smile gives little clue to her message. What does a 12-year-old write on something that she knows is intended to blow someone to smithereens? Not far away as the rocket flies, in south Lebanon, the children are in school. But the blackboard is sullied with chalk drawings of bombers smashing apartments, while an Iranian-made Raad-2 155 mm shell flies toward the planes.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 28, 2000
Children's book author Elizabeth Fitzgerald Howard was born in Baltimore and spent many summer weeks of her childhood visiting a slew of relatives as she grew up in Boston and Brookline, Mass. Her Baltimore kin are the characters in her books, one of which, "Aunt Flossie's Hats and CrabCakesLater," the author read to a group of city schoolchildren at Wednesday's downtown luncheon honoring this year's "Reading by 9" teachers. Living in Pittsburgh and teaching library science at West Virginia University, Howard, 72, also has written "Chita's Christmas Tree" and "Vergie Goes to School With Boys," both based on African-American characters Howard knew as a child.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | April 23, 1991
LITTLE DO THE squirmy kindergartners realize that the silver-haired woman among them in the main Enoch Pratt Free Library knows them well. "Please," Iona Opie asks librarian and storyteller Selma Levi, "I haven't got a blue and a green." Levi tears bits of blue and green crepe paper from her own streamers, hands them to Opie and proceeds with Maurice Sendak's "Where the Wild Things Are."When the children, fired up by Levi's telling of the tale, roar, gnash their teeth and wave their streamers in the wild rumpus that ensues, so does Opie.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Courtney Upshaw once lived in a house with no electricity or running water. He slept some nights on a worn couch that barely contained his growing frame. He arrived at the University of Alabama with little more than the clothes he was wearing. April 26, 2012 was supposed to be the night Upshaw would be rewarded for his perseverance. Yet as he sat in Radio City Music Hall in New York City, surrounded by friends and family, Upshaw fought back tears. He watched four of his college teammates become first-round draft picks.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 14, 1991
PBS begins a fascinating, ambitious project, titled simply "Childhood," tonight at 9 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67.This seven-week, seven-hour production could have been called "Wide World of Kids" as it spans the globe to bring you the constant variety of children.In tonight's first hour, called "Great Expectations," you begin to get to know several of the 12 families that the cameras of "Childhood" followed, in some cases for 18 months, recording their observances of important events in their family lives as well as the daily patterns that help to shape their children into adults.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | October 26, 1994
President Clinton has revealed why he could be so surprisingly tough in the way he confronted Saddam Hussein of Iraq and disposed of the military thugs of Haiti.It all goes back to his childhood in Arkansas.When he was just a lad in school, Clinton told Time magazine, a bully wanted to pick a fight with him."There was a guy who was a year older than me but not as big as me."He started picking on me at school one day when I was in the 8th grade."I felt sort of sorry for him because I knew he had a difficult life and he was always in kind of a sour mood."
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Date: Dec. 6 and 7 Her story: Zaineb Makhzoumi, 33, grew up in Lutherville. She is a dermatologist, Mohs surgeon and assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Her parents, Hassan and Rayya Makhzoumi, emigrated from Beirut in 1978. They moved back to Beirut in 2008, though Rayya returns to their Lutherville home several times a year. His story: Ayman Tomhe, 34, also grew up in Lutherville. He was a 7-Eleven franchisee for 10 years before opening a State Farm office in Baltimore last month.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Goudie | January 22, 2014
Childhood obesity is an epidemic in Baltimore, with the first signs seen in many children before they even reach traditional school age. Sixteen percent of the pre-kindergartners, ages 4 and 5, at one Northwest Baltimore public school were overweight, according to a 2013 survey of 150 students, and 12 percent of them were considered obese (above the 95th weight percentile for their ages and heights). Nearly half of the fourth-graders at that same school were overweight, and one in five of them was obese.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Dr. John M. Freeman, an internationally renowned Johns Hopkins pediatric neurologist and expert in pediatric epilepsy who had also been a medical ethicist, died Friday of cardiovascular disease at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The longtime Ruxton resident was 80. "Few Hopkins physicians have had a more profound effect than John Freeman on how we treat young patients who suffer from epilepsy and congenital abnormalities - and how we address the often-difficult ethical issues surrounding these potentially heart-breaking cases," said Ronald R. Peterson, president of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Gottfried Wagner, author, director, musicologist and great-grandson of Richard Wagner, had a significant role in the development of "Lost Childhood," an opera about the Holocaust and its aftermath. The work, composed by Janice Hamer to a libretto by Baltimore poet Mary Azrael, will be performed (in concert form) Saturday at Strathmore. Wagner, who inspired one of the two main characters in the opera, plans to attend the performance. Prior to leaving his home in Italy for the trip here, Wagner replied to some questions I sent by email.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
On the night of Nov. 9, 1938, a well-orchestrated anti-Jewish pogrom erupted throughout Germany and Austria. Synagogues, businesses and homes were attacked, lives were lost. The vicious destruction continued into a second night. The amount of broken glass afterward led to an infamous name for the incident - Kristallnacht. Through the shards could be detected the seeds of the Holocaust. This Saturday, 75 years after Kristallnacht began, an opera about the legacy of the Nazi era will be performed in concert form at the Music Center at Strathmore . "Lost Childhood" has a libretto by Baltimore poet Mary Azrael and music by New Jersey native Janice Hamer.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 30, 2013
As the governor's race enters full force this fall, several candidates are expected to tackle education issues such as the widening achievement gap among students in Maryland's schools,  The Sun's Erin Cox reported Monday.  Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who formally entered the race last week, is scheduled to announce Monday a plan that would funnel casino money to expanding Pre-K for low-income families. According to Cox's story, which you can read here, Gansler believes the state's current model of funding half-day preschool is not family friendly, and contributes to the achievement gap between white and minority students.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 11, 2000
"YOU CAN MAKE your child a millionaire," says Family Circle magazine, Feb. 15. "Let's say you give your 12-year-old weekly chores around the house: cleaning his or her room, taking out the garbage, doing the dishes, washing the car. In exchange, you pay your child $20 a week, or $1,040 a year. But instead of giving the money outright, put it in a Childhood IRA for your son or daughter." In a Childhood IRA that's invested in good growth mutual funds, and if the funds grow at an average rate of 10 percent annually, the child's IRA will be worth $16,575 in 10 years, the article says.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | March 11, 1993
If you want to get a handle on the status of children in today's society, you might start by considering this: Of the hundred or so people still barricaded inside the armed Texas compound ruled by cult leader David Koresh, 17 are said to be children.And each of these children, said Koresh, has expressed a desire to die along with him.It is a claim that boggles the mind.Question: Is there anyone out there who really believes that children, cult members or not, are capable of making such a decision?
NEWS
September 9, 2013
Just a few years ago, Maryland's infant mortality rates were comparable to those in some developing countries, a tragic failure of public health that brought heartache and unimaginable loss to hundreds of families each year. Yet despite the fact there are no quick or easy fixes that will end the suffering of grieving parents and relatives, Maryland recently has made important strides in solving what once seemed an intractable problem. The lessons of those successes offer hope of even greater progress in the future if the effort can be sustained.
ENTERTAINMENT
Denise Weiss and For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Hello rose lovers and welcome to Season 9 of The Bachelorette!  It's been a long 77 days for us 'Bachelor' fans, but I am back and ready to bring you the play-by-play as we follow Desiree on her second chance at love, which is sure to be filled with testosterone-fueled drama! The “journey for love” starts as Des drives up in a dingy Honda Accord and gazes at her new Malibu beach pad.  Chris Harrison greets her at the Malibu beach house door and takes her for a tour of her new digs.  As they walk from room to room, we are reminded of Des' humiliation as she begged Sean not to let her go last season.
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