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NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - Republicans and Democrats united yesterday to push through the Senate a $10 billion bill that would send tax-credit checks of up to $400 per child to 6.5 million low-income families who earn too little to owe income tax. The measure passed overwhelmingly, 94-2, after a week of pressure from Democrats, resistance from Republicans and, finally, frenzied negotiations. Democrats had mounted an intense campaign to force Republicans to extend the child tax credit to lower-income families who would not otherwise be eligible under the new tax-cut law. Republican negotiators had dropped a provision that would have included those families.
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NEWS
By Michael Tanner | August 13, 2013
Contrary to stereotypes, there is no evidence that people on welfare are lazy. Indeed, surveys of welfare recipients consistently show their desire for a job. However, there is also evidence that many are reluctant to accept available employment opportunities. In fact, despite the work requirements included in the 1996 welfare reform, less than 13 percent of adult welfare recipients in Maryland are working in unsubsidized jobs, while roughly 45 percent are involved in the broader definition of work participation, which includes activities like job search and training.
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NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Firing back at Democrats in a fight over extending child tax credits to low-income families, House Republican leaders said yesterday that they would approve the credit tomorrow - but only as part of a far broader $82 billion tax-cut measure. The proposed House bill, which would raise the child tax credit through 2010 and increase the income limit for married people who can claim it, is sure to pass the House. But it has little chance in the Senate, which last week passed a shorter-term measure.
EXPLORE
February 11, 2013
The Harford Community Action Agency is again providing the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program to people and families with low- to moderate-incomes (annual income of up to $50,000). The program is a free income tax assistance service where help with preparing and filing (paper or electronically) state and federal returns are offered; the program is also able to assist with filing prior year as well as amended returns. The program helps filers take advantage of all the tax credits for which they are eligible, whether they owe taxes.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After considering a variety of options, Bob Dole has decided to make a 15 percent, across-the-board tax cut the centerpiece of the economic plan he will unveil today, aides said last night.The $541 billion proposal, which Dole is scheduled to formally announce in Chicago, will call for the tax cut for 90 million taxpayers to be phased in over three years.Included in the six-year tax cut plan is a $500 per child tax credit, which would be phased in over two years, beginning with a $250 per child credit in 1997.
NEWS
By Michael Tanner | August 13, 2013
Contrary to stereotypes, there is no evidence that people on welfare are lazy. Indeed, surveys of welfare recipients consistently show their desire for a job. However, there is also evidence that many are reluctant to accept available employment opportunities. In fact, despite the work requirements included in the 1996 welfare reform, less than 13 percent of adult welfare recipients in Maryland are working in unsubsidized jobs, while roughly 45 percent are involved in the broader definition of work participation, which includes activities like job search and training.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Senate is nearing a deal to approve, as early as today, a measure that would send tax-credit checks of up to $400 a child to 6.5 million low-income families, after Democrats spent the week hammering at Republicans for denying such families the credit under the new tax cut. Senate leaders negotiated intensely yesterday to reach a bipartisan deal, but it was unclear whether a vote would come by the end of the week. Conservative Republicans in the Senate and House, who are loath to give a tax credit to people who earn too little to owe income taxes, are pushing to pair the bill with other long-sought tax cuts, such as a repeal of the estate tax. Democrats seized on reports that the 10-year, $350 billion tax-cut package enacted last week deprives many lower-income people of some of its benefits - and provides nothing for others - to renew their attacks on Republicans for what they say is an unfair measure.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The chief Republican tax writer in the House dropped a provision yesterday from his tax-cutting bill that had drawn heavy criticism from Democrats, saying he hoped the Clinton administration would offer a compromise in return and help avert partisan warfare over the plan.Rep. Bill Archer of Texas, who is chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, said he would delete a measure that would keep some low- and moderate-income taxpayers from receiving the full benefit of a proposed $500 per child credit if they also claimed a tax credit for child-care expenses.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - Sometimes the system works. Democrats and Republicans alike have been stirred into action by the news that President Bush's latest tax cut left out a healthy chunk of the working poor. The sudden surge appears to have been sparked by the realization that low-income workers pay taxes, too. Republicans and the White House appear to have been caught off guard by the news that the tax cut bill Mr. Bush signed does not, as he said in his April 26 weekly radio address, "reduce tax rates for everyone who pays income tax."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Congress fills in the details of the budget deal struck by President Clinton and Republican leaders, there is likely to be less of everything than its backers expect -- less tax relief, less deficit reduction, less spending for social programs.Clinton and the GOP leadership made so many promises to build bipartisan support for the broad outlines of the agreement, announced Friday in Baltimore, that it may be impossible to redeem them all.Thus, while Congress is expected to easily approve the nonbinding budget resolution endorsing the spending blueprint by Memorial Day, there are likely to be some nasty fights ahead as the various factions who supported the deal try to collect their chits.
NEWS
By Rebecca Wagner and Bruce Lesley | December 16, 2012
As the federal "fiscal cliff" approaches, an important group of Marylanders with a lot on the line has been largely ignored: children. The stakes are immense, because the recession has been hard on Maryland children, with one out of every seven living in poverty. A recent analysis by the nonpartisan Urban Institute found that nearly 120,000 Maryland children live with an unemployed parent - about triple the population of Annapolis. Compared to 2007, that's a 180 percent increase, and when you look at kids living with a long-term unemployed parent, the increase is 320 percent.
NEWS
By Elijah E. Cummings | April 15, 2010
"When I find a man who is not willing to bear his share of the burdens of the government which protects him, I find a man who is unworthy to enjoy the blessings of a government like ours." — William Jennings Bryan April 15 has come far too quickly for many Americans. Especially as we recover from a deep recession, tax time is a pain. However, this year, thanks to President Barack Obama and Congress, things will be just a little easier for millions of middle-class Marylanders.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 4, 2008
Last week's column about the IRS trying to clear up confusion over the tax rebates generated still more questions from readers. This week, the IRS is making another effort to get the word out on rebates, which are part of new legislation to help the economy. Beginning this week and continuing for the next two, the IRS will mail letters to more than 130 million taxpayers to remind them to file a 2007 tax return. That's one of the requirements for getting a tax rebate. The agency will follow up in late March with another letter to certain recipients of Social Security and Veterans Affairs benefits.
NEWS
September 28, 2004
ON THE face of it, the popular tax cuts that Congress voted to extend last week are hard to argue against. That was, of course, a big part of timing them to expire in a presidential election year. Who could vote against the Working Families Relief Act of 2004? But this so-called middle-class tax-cut bill -- extending the $1,000 child tax credit, marriage penalty relief, expansion of the 10-percent tax bracket, and relief from the alternative minimum tax -- has a lot in common with the Bush administration's three prior tax cuts: It benefits well-off taxpayers more than middle-class households out of proportion to the greater tax burdens on high-income earners.
BUSINESS
By Todd Beamon and Todd Beamon,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 21, 2004
Even though Tax Season 2004 is over, next April 15 will be here sooner than you might think. To help get a jump on next year, baltimoresun.com's tax experts -- Jim Dupree of the Maryland office of the Internal Revenue Service in Baltimore; Nicole M. Harrell, head of her own accounting firm in Baltimore; and Gregory S. Horning of Stout, Causey & Horning in Hunt Valley -- respond to one reader's e-mail, adding tips that could apply to most filers....
BUSINESS
By Todd Beamon and Todd Beamon,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 14, 2004
Tomorrow is Tax Day. Have you filed yet? For those who haven't, Baltimoresun.com's tax experts -- Jim Dupree of the Maryland office of the Internal Revenue Service in Baltimore; Nicole M. Harrell, head of her own accounting firm in Baltimore; and Gregory S. Horning of Stout, Causey & Horning in Hunt Valley -- offer advice for last-minute filers. They will return next week to answer questions about how to make filing next year much easier. Dupree: My advice for the last-minute filer is to file electronically!
NEWS
June 1, 2003
ALMOST 80 years ago, that great witness to American wealth, class and ambition, F. Scott Fitzgerald, wrote: "Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me." Now comes this Bush administration, giving that literary turn harsh new meaning. The rich, Mr. Bush and his GOP cohorts believe, shouldn't have to pay so much income taxes. And they should pay as little as possible - preferably nothing - in taxes on their investments and estates. The administration cloaks this radical agenda in the unproven fantasy of trickle-down, supply-side economics.
NEWS
September 28, 2004
ON THE face of it, the popular tax cuts that Congress voted to extend last week are hard to argue against. That was, of course, a big part of timing them to expire in a presidential election year. Who could vote against the Working Families Relief Act of 2004? But this so-called middle-class tax-cut bill -- extending the $1,000 child tax credit, marriage penalty relief, expansion of the 10-percent tax bracket, and relief from the alternative minimum tax -- has a lot in common with the Bush administration's three prior tax cuts: It benefits well-off taxpayers more than middle-class households out of proportion to the greater tax burdens on high-income earners.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
As a single mother of five, Sandy Dixon was ecstatic when a tax preparer said her federal refund this spring would be $5,000, thanks to the increase in the child tax credit. "That's wonderful," said Dixon, a special-education teacher. "It's more than a paycheck." In anticipation of the windfall, Dixon spent half of it on carpeting for her Baltimore home. Now to the dismay of Dixon - and more than a million other taxpayers - it turns out the calculation was wrong. That's because last summer, to pump up the economy, the Bush administration gave families an advance on their child credit of up to $400 per child.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | February 8, 2004
As tax returns roll into the Internal Revenue Service, one glaring error is cropping up among filers with dependents. Many parents forgot they received a child tax-credit advance last year and are trying to claim the full $1,000 per child on their 2003 returns. No can do. Here's what is causing the problem: A tax cut enacted in May gave more than 25 million households an early cut of the child tax credit, which was increased to $1,000 from $600 per child in 2002. The advance hit mailboxes in the summer, up to $400 per child claimed on your 2002 tax return.
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