Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChild Safety Seats
IN THE NEWS

Child Safety Seats

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 20, 1995
Police monitor safety belt useWestminster police said 35 percent of the motorists in the city did not wear safety belts during an observation day at four intersections last month. More than 2,400 vehicles were checked, they said.Police said 75 percent of female drivers wore seat belts while 57 percent of male drivers wore the safety restraints. Forty-three percent of all truck drivers (pickup trucks or larger) wore the belts.Officers said 100 percent of the motorcycles riders were obeying the law and wore helmets during the safety check.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | August 26, 2013
Howard County police will conduct a sobriety checkpoint this weekend at an undisclosed location. The checkpoint is being done to "to promote awareness and reduce the number of alcohol-impaired drivers on the roads," and is part of the initiative aimed at keeping county roads safe, according to a news release. According to police, the checkpoint will be clearly marked with signs, lights and uniformed officers who willutilize both marked and unmarked vehicles and will be checking for violations including driving under the influence of alcohol, failure to use seat belts and failure to use child safety seats.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 24, 2012
A state program will begin offering instruction on properly installing child safety seats via video chat, potentially reaching parents who can't get to an inspection event. The program will begin April 30 as a pilot. Parents can sign up for a free Skype account and make an appointment for a chat by calling 1-800-370-SEAT. The parents will also have to complete a participant confirmation form. The parents, sitting in view of their car seat with their smart phone or laptop, will get a call.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Driving on Park Heights Avenue recently, Debbi Baer happened on the kind of scene that tends to transform her, Clark Kent-style, from apparently mild-mannered Pikesville grandmother into fearless crusader. Stopped at a red light, as she recalls the story, she looked into the next car and saw a baby in a woman's lap. No seat belts or safety seats were in sight. She swung into action. The 4-foot-11 Baer used her Ford Taurus to block the woman's path. She reported the violation to a nearby policeman.
NEWS
November 26, 1996
HOT-BUTTON ISSUES in the Annapolis State House often involve driving -- how fast, how safe, how sober. And typically, the debate is framed in these terms: individual freedom versus the risks and costs to society.During the past decade, societal concerns for health and safety have won many times -- from mandatory motorcycle helmets and truck covers to child safety seats and stiffer standards for drunken driving. This is probably due to many Marylanders' sense that the pace on their roads has become faster and more aggressive.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
State troopers in Westminster will use stuffed black-and-white toy cows this week to promote a crackdown on motorists who fail to buckle up children or place them in child safety seats. The unrestrained children will receive the cow, its red shirt bearing the message: "Don't Moooove Until You Buckle Up." The driver will get a $48 ticket for safety-seat violations or a $25 ticket for seat-belt violations."It's national ABC [America Buckles up Children] Week leading into the Memorial Day weekend, and our troopers will step up enforcement of seat belt and child passenger safety laws," said 1st Sgt. Dean Richardson.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
On the surface, those doggie seatbelts and car harnesses featured in catalogs seem like a good idea. After all, if we buckle up on the road, shouldn't our pets? The difference is that while human seatbelts are carefully tested and held to strict quality and design standards, the same is not true for pet restraints, so there's no guarantee Fido or Fluffy is actually safer wearing one. That may be about to change. Carmaker Subaru of America, Inc. , announced it has teamed up with the Center for Pet Safety to fund testing of car safety restraints for pets.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Tens of thousands of lives have been saved over the years because Americans more routinely wear seat belts and don't drive drunk. But there are other public health threats from those who text while driving or overdose on prescription drugs. That's why a group of researchers began looking at which prevention measures work and who is using them across the country to stem the rate of injuries of all kinds. Injuries are the third-leading cause of death for adults and the biggest killer of young people.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | August 26, 2013
Howard County police will conduct a sobriety checkpoint this weekend at an undisclosed location. The checkpoint is being done to "to promote awareness and reduce the number of alcohol-impaired drivers on the roads," and is part of the initiative aimed at keeping county roads safe, according to a news release. According to police, the checkpoint will be clearly marked with signs, lights and uniformed officers who willutilize both marked and unmarked vehicles and will be checking for violations including driving under the influence of alcohol, failure to use seat belts and failure to use child safety seats.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Driving on Park Heights Avenue recently, Debbi Baer happened on the kind of scene that tends to transform her, Clark Kent-style, from apparently mild-mannered Pikesville grandmother into fearless crusader. Stopped at a red light, as she recalls the story, she looked into the next car and saw a baby in a woman's lap. No seat belts or safety seats were in sight. She swung into action. The 4-foot-11 Baer used her Ford Taurus to block the woman's path. She reported the violation to a nearby policeman.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
On the surface, those doggie seatbelts and car harnesses featured in catalogs seem like a good idea. After all, if we buckle up on the road, shouldn't our pets? The difference is that while human seatbelts are carefully tested and held to strict quality and design standards, the same is not true for pet restraints, so there's no guarantee Fido or Fluffy is actually safer wearing one. That may be about to change. Carmaker Subaru of America, Inc. , announced it has teamed up with the Center for Pet Safety to fund testing of car safety restraints for pets.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Tens of thousands of lives have been saved over the years because Americans more routinely wear seat belts and don't drive drunk. But there are other public health threats from those who text while driving or overdose on prescription drugs. That's why a group of researchers began looking at which prevention measures work and who is using them across the country to stem the rate of injuries of all kinds. Injuries are the third-leading cause of death for adults and the biggest killer of young people.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 24, 2012
A state program will begin offering instruction on properly installing child safety seats via video chat, potentially reaching parents who can't get to an inspection event. The program will begin April 30 as a pilot. Parents can sign up for a free Skype account and make an appointment for a chat by calling 1-800-370-SEAT. The parents will also have to complete a participant confirmation form. The parents, sitting in view of their car seat with their smart phone or laptop, will get a call.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 10, 2012
State lawmakers have passed legislation pushed by Maryland doctors that will change the state's child safety seat laws. The law requires children under the age of 8 to sit in a child car safety seats unless they are 4'9" or taller. The bill, pushed by doctors group MedChi, did not include requirements that kids stay rear facing until age 2 or ride in the backseat until age 13 as the doctors group had wanted. Maryland law still recommends that kids under age 13 sit in the backseat.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
A Maryland doctors' group is pushing legislation to bolster the state's child safety seat laws, a move designed to better protect toddlers from head, neck and spinal injuries during accidents. The Maryland State Medical Society, also known as MedChi, wants the state to adopt recommendations made last year by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The recommendations include lengthening the amount of time young children have to stay in seats facing the rear of the car and raising the age that children should have to sit in the back seat.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 9, 2003
The Harford County Highway Safety Committee and MD KISS (Maryland Kids in Safety Seats) will check child safety car seats by appointment from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday in the vehicle bays at the Level Volunteer Fire Company in Churchville. To schedule an appointment, call committee coordinator Kathy Acquavella at 410-638-4924. The program is for parents and child-care providers to make sure child safety seats are properly installed and being used correctly in their vehicles. The checks are part of an observance of Child Passenger Safety Week, a national effort to draw attention to ways to keep children safe in motor vehicles.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 6, 2001
Maryland State Police announced yesterday that the agency will lend child-safety seats to motorists at its 23 barracks and Pikesville headquarters, beginning Sunday. Under a program funded by a $40,000 grant from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, state police purchased 154 safety seats and will have about five at each of the barracks, said Lt. Col. William Arrington. State police are also setting up "fitting stations" at each barracks, where troopers will inspect safety seats and help drivers install them, Arrington said.
NEWS
September 29, 1995
The Anne Arundel County Police Department won first-place honors in a national program for its work in promoting seat belts, child safety seats and air bags.The department captured the prize in the 1994 Challenge Awards Program of the International Association of Chiefs of Police on the basis of its traffic safety programs last year.Operation SEE (Safety, Education and Enforcement), a child passenger safety program; and a seat belt checkpoint at Anne Arundel Community College were two of the newest programs that helped the county department win the honors.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 6, 2001
Maryland State Police announced yesterday that the agency will lend child-safety seats to motorists at its 23 barracks and Pikesville headquarters, beginning Sunday. Under a program funded by a $40,000 grant from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, state police purchased 154 safety seats and will have about five at each of the barracks, said Lt. Col. William Arrington. State police are also setting up "fitting stations" at each barracks, where troopers will inspect safety seats and help drivers install them, Arrington said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
State troopers in Westminster will use stuffed black-and-white toy cows this week to promote a crackdown on motorists who fail to buckle up children or place them in child safety seats. The unrestrained children will receive the cow, its red shirt bearing the message: "Don't Moooove Until You Buckle Up." The driver will get a $48 ticket for safety-seat violations or a $25 ticket for seat-belt violations."It's national ABC [America Buckles up Children] Week leading into the Memorial Day weekend, and our troopers will step up enforcement of seat belt and child passenger safety laws," said 1st Sgt. Dean Richardson.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.