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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 10, 2012
State lawmakers have passed legislation pushed by Maryland doctors that will change the state's child safety seat laws. The law requires children under the age of 8 to sit in a child car safety seats unless they are 4'9" or taller. The bill, pushed by doctors group MedChi, did not include requirements that kids stay rear facing until age 2 or ride in the backseat until age 13 as the doctors group had wanted. Maryland law still recommends that kids under age 13 sit in the backseat.
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NEWS
By L. Anthony Loman | July 25, 2014
Over the past year Maryland's Department of Human Resources has begun implementing a different approach to families reported for child abuse and neglect called "Alternative Response" (AR). Also referred to as "Differential Response," similar reforms to Child Protection Services (CPS) have been implemented in other states during the past 20 years. The common theme of these reforms is a recognition that the situations of families differ substantially and that responses to child maltreatment reports should vary accordingly.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 6, 2001
Maryland State Police announced yesterday that the agency will lend child-safety seats to motorists at its 23 barracks and Pikesville headquarters, beginning Sunday. Under a program funded by a $40,000 grant from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, state police purchased 154 safety seats and will have about five at each of the barracks, said Lt. Col. William Arrington. State police are also setting up "fitting stations" at each barracks, where troopers will inspect safety seats and help drivers install them, Arrington said.
NEWS
Aegis report | April 8, 2013
April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month and throughout the month CASA of Harford County is putting a focus making children's healthy development a community priority. "When parents have the knowledge, skills, and resources to provide children with safe, stable, nurturing, and healthy environments, we can prevent abuse and neglect before they occur," CASA noted in a press release. CASA is short for Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children. As part of the highlighting effort, CASA is planning a candlelight vigil outside of the Harford County Circuit Courthouse, facing Main Street, on Wednesday, April 17th at 7:30 p.m. On display will be a pinwheel garden "planted" by CASA of Harford County staff and volunteers.
NEWS
September 29, 1995
The Anne Arundel County Police Department won first-place honors in a national program for its work in promoting seat belts, child safety seats and air bags.The department captured the prize in the 1994 Challenge Awards Program of the International Association of Chiefs of Police on the basis of its traffic safety programs last year.Operation SEE (Safety, Education and Enforcement), a child passenger safety program; and a seat belt checkpoint at Anne Arundel Community College were two of the newest programs that helped the county department win the honors.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 9, 2003
The Harford County Highway Safety Committee and MD KISS (Maryland Kids in Safety Seats) will check child safety car seats by appointment from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday in the vehicle bays at the Level Volunteer Fire Company in Churchville. To schedule an appointment, call committee coordinator Kathy Acquavella at 410-638-4924. The program is for parents and child-care providers to make sure child safety seats are properly installed and being used correctly in their vehicles. The checks are part of an observance of Child Passenger Safety Week, a national effort to draw attention to ways to keep children safe in motor vehicles.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | December 20, 1994
Q: I worry about my toddler's safety during the Christmas season.Do you have any tips about protecting a child while shopping?A: Few things are as frightening as realizing your child is missing in a crowd.Fortunately, though the anxiety is real, the risk is quite low, and you can guard against it.Maintain bodily contact with your toddler by pushing a stroller, holding hands or by a child tether. During serious shopping, your attention will be diverted by transactions and your hands and arms by bundles.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1995
Car seats are everywhere. In the laundry room. In the den. In the shed. At her sister's house. They've taken over Debbie Baer's house, and they've taken over her life.Hardly a day goes by when someone doesn't call the 47-year-old Pikesville nurse for advice on buying car seats or help in installing one. She often invites callers over so she can personally inspect their car seats.Then there's her parking lot crusade. Wherever she goes, Mrs. Baer scouts for improperly installed child seats.
NEWS
By Steven Kreytak and Steven Kreytak,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 12, 1998
Soccer balls will fly later this month as area youths gather to promote child safety, raise money and remember an 8-year-old boy killed in a garage door accident.This year's Simon Decker Memorial Soccer Tournament will be bigger than ever and should raise about $30,000 to support programs in Howard County that protect children and promote child safety, according to Steve Levin, who is directing the tournament with the Soccer Association of Columbia/Howard County.The first two years, the tournament netted about $16,000 for Howard County General Hospital's Pediatric Emergency Services.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Child-safety seats will be made simpler to install in cars under a new federal rule President Clinton will announce today.In his weekly radio address, Clinton plans to say that all new passenger cars, vans and trucks will be required to have a new "universal system" for installing child-safety seats by 1999.The seats are proven life-savers. Studies show they cut the risk of death or serious injury to infants in car crashes by 70 percent and cut in half the fatality and injury rates of children ages 1 to 4.Some 350 preschool children were killed in 1995 traffic accidents.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 18, 2012
It's Child Passenger Safety Awareness Week , and state health officials want to remind drivers to make sure everyone is safe on the way to school, extracurricular activities or other destinations. “It is the driver's responsibility to make sure each child is properly restrained - every trip, every time,” said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, secretary for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in a statement. Here are some tips form the Kids In Safety Seats program: +Make sure the car is at a complete stop before anyone unbuckles.
EXPLORE
September 8, 2012
A mother and her two-year-old child escaped injury Saturday afternoon when a tree fell on their SUV in the 2800 block of Clayton Road in Joppa. "Nobody was injured," a sergeant with the Southern Precinct of the Harford County Sheriff's Office said Saturday evening. The mother was backing her Ford Explorer out of a driveway onto Clayton Road when the trunk of a gum tree across the street fell and smashed the vehicle. The incident happened while it was still a sunny day before a powerful line of thunderstorms ripped across Harford County.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
With record highs on tap for the next few days , experts are reminding us to keep an eye out on our kids and vehicles. The Howard County Police are asking people to remember the kids can get overheated very quickly, and that cars parked in direct sunlight can reach temperatures of 131 degrees to 172 degrees F when outside temperatures are 80-100, and we're expecting higher than 100. "It's critical that caregivers know it is never safe...
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 10, 2012
State lawmakers have passed legislation pushed by Maryland doctors that will change the state's child safety seat laws. The law requires children under the age of 8 to sit in a child car safety seats unless they are 4'9" or taller. The bill, pushed by doctors group MedChi, did not include requirements that kids stay rear facing until age 2 or ride in the backseat until age 13 as the doctors group had wanted. Maryland law still recommends that kids under age 13 sit in the backseat.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
A Maryland doctors' group is pushing legislation to bolster the state's child safety seat laws, a move designed to better protect toddlers from head, neck and spinal injuries during accidents. The Maryland State Medical Society, also known as MedChi, wants the state to adopt recommendations made last year by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The recommendations include lengthening the amount of time young children have to stay in seats facing the rear of the car and raising the age that children should have to sit in the back seat.
NEWS
By Les Cohen | September 4, 2011
We're having a baby. By "we," I mean my daughter and her husband. A new baby means, of course, a new child-safety seat for the car. I've been using an old Cabbage Patch doll to make sure I know how this new car seat works. (Remember Cabbage Patch dolls? This one was my daughter's, which my wife insisted we save, in the warehouse we call a basement, for our grandchildren.) The car seat comes with a 68-page manual. The one we got our own kids years ago had, I think, a sticker that said, "Insert baby here," with an arrow: "This end up. " The seat we just bought is a top-of-the-line Britax (pronounced with a long "i")
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2002
The girls were taken by strangers from their homes, their yards and the cars of friends. The abductions of a handful of children in California, Utah and Pennsylvania this summer have gained vast amounts of media attention and raised fears among parents about safety. Child abductions by strangers are no more prevalent this year; last year at this time, 51 children had been abducted by strangers nationally, compared with 49 this year, according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1999
In an effort to curtail speeding and seat belt violations during the holiday weekend, Howard County police will target lawbreakers, concluding the department's participation in a two-month state-wide campaign and a weeklong national program.The Maryland Chief's Challenge is an annual program in which police departments set up checkpoints to target seat belt violations and to perform voluntary child-seat inspections. Police are also participating in a national program -- Operation ABC (America Buckles-Up Children)
HEALTH
May 27, 2010
With Memorial Day approaching and school soon reaching an end, it's a good time to brush up on summer health and safety. Dr. Bill Zirkin of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's emergency department talks about common summer issues and how to avoid them. Question: What are the warning signs of heatstroke or other heat-related illness? What are the best ways to avoid it? Answer: Heat-related illnesses, including heatstroke, which is the most severe condition caused by overheating, are caused by the body's inability to cool itself.
NEWS
By Scott D. Krugman and Wendy G. Lane | March 19, 2010
When one adult hits another, Maryland law defines this as assault. When a larger, stronger adult hits a child, this act can be interpreted under Maryland law as "reasonable" discipline. We find it difficult to understand why it is acceptable to hit a child with an object such as a belt, when it is always unacceptable to hit another adult, either with a fist or anything else. "Spare the rod ... spoil the child" has guided child rearing for thousands of years. Almost all parents have used physical (or corporal)
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