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NEWS
November 26, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Parents play an integral role in their progeny's schooling. In order to help your child have a successful year, you need to know what is expected of him academically. School conferences build a bridge to the other pivotal partners in educational development. Here are some steps you can take to build a positive working relationship with your child's teacher. Before the conference: When you receive a request to set up a conference, respond immediately.
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NEWS
November 10, 2002
When confetti flies, police take action Kudos to the crack Westminster Police force and its stellar officer Steve Atwood for standing between us citizens and total chaos ("Westminster police rain on former official's parade," Nov. 5). His actions in the case of 60-year-old Rebecca Orenstein speak volumes for the vigilant and diligent attention to the safety of our fair city by the police. While open air drug deals occur with regularity in the very neighborhood where Ms. Orenstein lives, our officers spend inordinate amounts of time and energy entrapping "speeders" on Center Street and Uniontown Road.
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FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | October 6, 1999
A hundred years ago, learning to read consisted of a teacher presenting basic skills and students repeating and practicing them. Young readers in the 21st century must learn to be investigators, researchers, analysts and critics. Reading instruction has shifted from teaching a series of discrete skills to inculcating strategies that involve the reader as much as the writer.In today's classrooms, children are encouraged to discuss issues. They may be asked to give oral book reports or explain a science project.
NEWS
November 26, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Parents play an integral role in their progeny's schooling. In order to help your child have a successful year, you need to know what is expected of him academically. School conferences build a bridge to the other pivotal partners in educational development. Here are some steps you can take to build a positive working relationship with your child's teacher. Before the conference: When you receive a request to set up a conference, respond immediately.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
Editor's note: Jerdine Nolen today writes about ways to encourage children to be successful lifelong learners. Her column appears biweekly.Remember when you were entering third grade? Do you remember your fourth grade teacher? Do you remember what it felt like to leave the elementary school building behind and enter the middle school building for the first time?Using these memory cues can help parents walk down memory lane and anticipate the challenges facing children at these milestones.
NEWS
June 13, 1995
Whole LanguageAs a teacher of sometimes reluctant learners, I have been following the series of letters on to-whole-language or not-to-whole-language with interest.Schools, as in politics and business, seem to look for trends and latch on to them. This tends to result in a continual swaying between one currently "correct" philosophy to another.Keeping up with the swing of the pendulum can be difficult enough for teachers, but the average parent is not kept informed with the kind of in-service education teachers receive.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | October 30, 1994
This year's first report cards aren't out yet, but something tells you that all is not well with your child this school year.If you were home every day, you could talk over her day at school while the events are still fresh in her mind and her feelings still close to the surface.But you're at work during those first critical hours after school, so you'll have to be more subtle. Here are some ways to determine if your child is having problems at school:* Check in by phone after school. If you can't check in yourself, ask a friend or relative or the parent of a playmate to pinch-hit for you -- and to write down anything negative, no matter how seemingly insignificant, your child says.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | September 19, 1999
Parents seek tutoring for a variety of reasons, but the first step is to go through a fact-finding mission.GET TO KNOW YOUR CHILD:Ask his teachers how he's doing in comparison with others in his grade.Try to determine your child's learning style. Read the book, "The Way They Learn: How to Discover and Teach To Your Child's Strengths" by Cynthia Tobias.Observe your child at home doing homework and at school during reading class and record what you notice. Some children struggle at home but are hard workers at school.
NEWS
February 21, 1999
Editor's note: In her biweekly column, Jerdine Nolen today provides suggestions on how to support a reluctant reader or delayed communicator.There is no such thing as normal reading development. But by certain ages, there are certain expectations. If these expectations are not met, parents should find out why. Get help and support so you know what to do to help your child. Though it can be frustrating for all guardians concerned (teachers, parents, etc.) if the child is not reading, it's even more frustrating for your child.
FEATURES
November 18, 1998
In a 15-minute conference with your child's teacher, you probably won't have enough time to ask each of these suggested questions, so peruse this list from "Preschool for Parents" by Diane Trister Dodge and Toni S. Bichart, and pick the ones most important to you.* How do you help children develop a sense of responsibility and self-discipline?* How do you help children work on conflict resolution skills?* Do you involve children in group discussions about social issues and about what they are learning* What are your goals for my child in reading and how will you help him achieve these goals?
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | March 12, 2000
Q. Would you address the issue of teachers policing pupils and looking for signs of what they think is child abuse? My daughter was reported to the Office of Children's Services after her daughter's teacher questioned her about looking sad one morning and she explained that she was bad and had been spanked. (The spanking left a small red mark on her hand and leg.) My daughter is a wonderful mother, completely devoted to this beautiful, strong-willed 6-year-old, and spanked her when all else failed.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | November 17, 1999
Parental involvement is critical to the success of children in school.A perfect time to get to know your child's teacher and school is during American Education Week, Nov. 14-20.Schools usually invite parents in this week to see what their children are learning.Parent-teacher conferences are often held around this time. Here are some suggestions for a successful parent-teacher conference.Call your child's school and request a conference with the teacher.Arrive promptly. Teachers usually schedule several parent conferences in a row.Be prepared to listen first, and then speak.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | October 17, 1999
Persistent efforts are being made in our nation to educate all children to be reading well by third grade. Still, many children are not "Reading by 9." Sometimes a child's difficulty with reading and writing is developmental, or the school's method may not be appropriate for him. In some cases, a child may have a learning disability, and getting help early can be a key to his future success.A learning disability is a lifelong disorder that affects the manner in which individuals with normal or above-average intelligence select, retain and express information.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
Editor's note: Jerdine Nolen today writes about ways to encourage children to be successful lifelong learners. Her column appears biweekly.Remember when you were entering third grade? Do you remember your fourth grade teacher? Do you remember what it felt like to leave the elementary school building behind and enter the middle school building for the first time?Using these memory cues can help parents walk down memory lane and anticipate the challenges facing children at these milestones.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | October 6, 1999
A hundred years ago, learning to read consisted of a teacher presenting basic skills and students repeating and practicing them. Young readers in the 21st century must learn to be investigators, researchers, analysts and critics. Reading instruction has shifted from teaching a series of discrete skills to inculcating strategies that involve the reader as much as the writer.In today's classrooms, children are encouraged to discuss issues. They may be asked to give oral book reports or explain a science project.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | September 19, 1999
Parents seek tutoring for a variety of reasons, but the first step is to go through a fact-finding mission.GET TO KNOW YOUR CHILD:Ask his teachers how he's doing in comparison with others in his grade.Try to determine your child's learning style. Read the book, "The Way They Learn: How to Discover and Teach To Your Child's Strengths" by Cynthia Tobias.Observe your child at home doing homework and at school during reading class and record what you notice. Some children struggle at home but are hard workers at school.
NEWS
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | October 17, 1999
Persistent efforts are being made in our nation to educate all children to be reading well by third grade. Still, many children are not "Reading by 9." Sometimes a child's difficulty with reading and writing is developmental, or the school's method may not be appropriate for him. In some cases, a child may have a learning disability, and getting help early can be a key to his future success.A learning disability is a lifelong disorder that affects the manner in which individuals with normal or above-average intelligence select, retain and express information.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | November 17, 1999
Parental involvement is critical to the success of children in school.A perfect time to get to know your child's teacher and school is during American Education Week, Nov. 14-20.Schools usually invite parents in this week to see what their children are learning.Parent-teacher conferences are often held around this time. Here are some suggestions for a successful parent-teacher conference.Call your child's school and request a conference with the teacher.Arrive promptly. Teachers usually schedule several parent conferences in a row.Be prepared to listen first, and then speak.
NEWS
February 21, 1999
Editor's note: In her biweekly column, Jerdine Nolen today provides suggestions on how to support a reluctant reader or delayed communicator.There is no such thing as normal reading development. But by certain ages, there are certain expectations. If these expectations are not met, parents should find out why. Get help and support so you know what to do to help your child. Though it can be frustrating for all guardians concerned (teachers, parents, etc.) if the child is not reading, it's even more frustrating for your child.
FEATURES
November 18, 1998
In a 15-minute conference with your child's teacher, you probably won't have enough time to ask each of these suggested questions, so peruse this list from "Preschool for Parents" by Diane Trister Dodge and Toni S. Bichart, and pick the ones most important to you.* How do you help children develop a sense of responsibility and self-discipline?* How do you help children work on conflict resolution skills?* Do you involve children in group discussions about social issues and about what they are learning* What are your goals for my child in reading and how will you help him achieve these goals?
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