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By BEVERLY MILLS | July 16, 1995
Q: My 12-year-old daughter is a loving, sweet child, but she's a terminal slob. I can't get her to stop leaving a mess, even though she says she's very sorry when she does it.Any ideas?B. M., Plymouth, Mich.A: What your daughter needs is a complete change of attitude. She's not likely to stop leaving a mess until she learns to value neatness.Teaching her this will not be easy."If she's a child who isn't bothered by clutter and disorder, she's a nester and you'll be trying to change her natural temperament," says Elizabeth Crary of Seattle, Wash.
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NEWS
October 22, 2008
Family's failure left a child dead Susan J. Griffin says, "I didn't kill this child" ("Mother: 'I didn't kill this child,'" Oct. 19). Well, if she did not kill her son, she and her husband certainly watched 2-year-old Andrew waste away and die. Neither she nor her husband can provide a plausible or understandable explanation for the blood spattered on the walls in the child's room, the bruises and scabs on his body, the black eye that he suffered or...
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FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair | November 4, 1990
Kids enjoy style too. And just like the rest of us, they want their private spaces to express their personalities and to accommodate their possessions and needs.So, before you rush out to furnish your child's room or play area, be sure to ask what sort of design he or she might prefer. And don't take initial lack of interest as an invitation to do your own thing. A child's rooms is not the place for adults to concoct their own version of what kids really want.Some children like lots of high-tech gimmicks and extra-planetary decorations.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | September 15, 2007
As John Keenan hauled the last of the furniture from his son Patrick's bedroom, he could hear banging upstairs. It was the sound of 13-year-old Thomas demolishing the wall that divided his bedroom from his big brother's. The Dumbarton Middle School eighth-grader, who said he formerly didn't have enough room to even throw his clothes on the floor, now has enough space for a drum set, a new stereo and a cage full of lizards. "The wall came down at the speed of light," says his father, a structural engineer who lives in Idlewylde.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
Family's failure left a child dead Susan J. Griffin says, "I didn't kill this child" ("Mother: 'I didn't kill this child,'" Oct. 19). Well, if she did not kill her son, she and her husband certainly watched 2-year-old Andrew waste away and die. Neither she nor her husband can provide a plausible or understandable explanation for the blood spattered on the walls in the child's room, the bruises and scabs on his body, the black eye that he suffered or...
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR | November 25, 1990
Even though a child's room is fun to furnish, many parents approach the task with a high degree of uncertainty. This is especially true for first-time moms and dads. Because they don't yet know the tricks of designing a space for a child, they're often perplexed at each phase of a son's or daughter's growth -- from infancy through preschool and into the pubescent and teen-age years.Clients in this situation always ask me the same basic questions. They wonder, first of all, whether light or dark colors are easier to maintain.
FEATURES
By Ro Logrippo and Ro Logrippo,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | October 24, 1993
Now that the school year is in full swing, it's time for parents to test their child's room, along with the rest of the house, for reader-friendliness.An area set aside for study time or story time should be quiet, comfortable and well-lighted. In tight spaces, that may translate to a nest of pillows on the bed. In spacious surroundings, it may mean a reading loft. In any case, success hinges on whether or not the setup promotes relaxation and concentration. For inspiration and ideas, visit bookstores, libraries or toy shops with children's reading corners.
FEATURES
By Ginger Mudd Galvez and Ginger Mudd Galvez,Contributing Writer | July 26, 1992
Wallcoverings designer Barbara Brower believes people are unnecessarily intimidated by wallpaper and borders. Here are her guidelines for giving a child's room a fresh, new look with a maximum of ease and minimum of money.* If the parent, rather than the child, picks the wallcoverings, be certain the child responds to the patterns. Forget the formal floral wallpaper that coordinates with the hallway.* If a girl's room does get a floral, pick a design that includes a friendly character. A boy's room can take a plaid, striped or patterned wallpaper as a neutral background, and then a boyish character border for warmth.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 31, 1995
Why is it that there never seems to be enough wall space in a child's room for storage units, cubbies and shelves?The answer has two parts. First, most kids are prone to creating chaos in their rooms, and no amount of storage space will ever be enough. Second -- and this is where interior design enters the equation -- most rooms in contemporary houses have lots of windows and closet doors. And that leaves little wall space for shelving, bookcases and other such storage structures.It's possible, of course, to install a set of inaccessible shelves.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer | December 27, 1992
I long ago lost count of all the interior spaces I've seen that were clearly intended to exhibit good taste but wound up being big bores.So many people falsely equate flamboyance with a lack of design standards. They assume, quite wrongly, that only a sedate setting can express a cultured sensibility.There's one room of the house, however, where this extremely conservative approach is almost never applied. Even the most staunch upholders of tradition will usually let loose their imagination when it comes to designing a child's room.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2001
When it came time for Dennis and Barbara Kurgansky to move from their home in Baltimore City to their new home in Kingsville, they knew it would be an exciting transition. Every nook and cranny of the new home was discussed and designed to their liking. Even the children's bedrooms were given a charismatic charm that they knew their two boys would enjoy. "The boys were not happy moving out of the only home they had ever known," said Barbara Kurgansky. "So the bedrooms became our leveling power.
FEATURES
By KAROL V. MENZIE and KAROL V. MENZIE,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
Details are often the difference between a room that's decorated and a room that's finished. One of the more charming aspects of visiting decorator show houses is seeing the profusion of clever detail: lamp finials that carry out a nautical theme, lamp shades that match wallpaper or fabric, floral arrangements that reinforce color schemes, subtle faux finishes that tease the eye. Thanks at least in part to all this interest in decorator detail, there are...
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 31, 1995
Why is it that there never seems to be enough wall space in a child's room for storage units, cubbies and shelves?The answer has two parts. First, most kids are prone to creating chaos in their rooms, and no amount of storage space will ever be enough. Second -- and this is where interior design enters the equation -- most rooms in contemporary houses have lots of windows and closet doors. And that leaves little wall space for shelving, bookcases and other such storage structures.It's possible, of course, to install a set of inaccessible shelves.
FEATURES
By BEVERLY MILLS | July 16, 1995
Q: My 12-year-old daughter is a loving, sweet child, but she's a terminal slob. I can't get her to stop leaving a mess, even though she says she's very sorry when she does it.Any ideas?B. M., Plymouth, Mich.A: What your daughter needs is a complete change of attitude. She's not likely to stop leaving a mess until she learns to value neatness.Teaching her this will not be easy."If she's a child who isn't bothered by clutter and disorder, she's a nester and you'll be trying to change her natural temperament," says Elizabeth Crary of Seattle, Wash.
FEATURES
By JOE SURKIEWICZ | March 6, 1994
Here's a deceptively easy question.What's your favorite room?Ask enough people and you'll hear some surprising answers: These days the most favored space in the house may not be the room with the most expensive furniture or a decorating scheme that says, "Hands off!"In the '90s, our favorite room is often the place where we can relax, express ourselves, have some fun -- and be happiest.A case in point:Cyd Beth Wolf, an attorney with Piper & Marbury, lives in a recently restored -- and lavishly appointed -- four-level Otterbein town house.
FEATURES
By Ro Logrippo and Ro Logrippo,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | October 24, 1993
Now that the school year is in full swing, it's time for parents to test their child's room, along with the rest of the house, for reader-friendliness.An area set aside for study time or story time should be quiet, comfortable and well-lighted. In tight spaces, that may translate to a nest of pillows on the bed. In spacious surroundings, it may mean a reading loft. In any case, success hinges on whether or not the setup promotes relaxation and concentration. For inspiration and ideas, visit bookstores, libraries or toy shops with children's reading corners.
FEATURES
By Ro Logrippo and Antonio F. Torrice and Ro Logrippo and Antonio F. Torrice,Universal Press Syndicate | July 27, 1991
Tiny white packing chips tumbled onto the floor from the gift box that Gregory ripped open, but the 4-year-old knew exactly what to do. Without coaching, he grabbed the small broom and dust pan that was nearby and swept up the mess.If it sounds too good to be true, guess again. Gregory and his good deed are as real as the cleanup supplies that line part of the wall of his bedroom.Most small children love to mimic parental behavior by playing house. They love to "cook" on a pretend stove or "iron" on a pint-size ironing board.
FEATURES
By RITA ST. CLAIR | October 27, 1991
Q: With another baby on the way, I want to move my young daughter into a currently unused room. But I'm perplexed about where to put the bed, which has 5-foot headboard posts. There's only one wall without openings, and it begins to slant about 3 feet above the floor. I'd like your advice on this problem and on the overall design of the room.A: The first thing to understand is that a bed doesn't always have to be placed against a wall. It can be pulled out a few feet. As the accompanying photo shows, that would be one simple solution to your dilemma.
FEATURES
By Ro Logrippo and Ro Logrippo,Contributing Writer | September 19, 1993
Imagine transforming chipped metal beds, a dilapidated school desk and a small beat-up chair into furnishings fit for a child's room on display.Preposterous? Guess again. These postwar items highlighted a benefit showcase setting designed for two young brothers destined to occupy the space. Of course, by the time the bruised '40s and '50s finds were permitted public scrutiny, they'd been refurbished to original glory.All old furniture isn't face lift material. What made these ideal hopefuls?
FEATURES
By Ro Logrippo and Ro Logrippo,Contributing Writer | June 20, 1993
A room for children that no longer fits their needs is much like a pair of outgrown jeans. But unlike clothing that's too small to wear, spaces that seem too confining can be redesigned to be functional and flexible.Accommodating a child's living needs in tight quarters is often an exercise in ingenuity. Sometimes it takes being creative with storage solutions. Or it requires two-for-one strategy so a single furnishing performs two functions.Easing the frustration in a room that stifles work and play may depend on a visual trick or two. But more on that later.
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