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By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
Baltimore's top health official proposed yesterday that the state reform its troubled child protective system by stationing abuse caseworkers in hospitals 24 hours a day and acting more quickly to remove minors from dangerous homes. Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, the city's health commissioner, said the reforms to the state-run Baltimore Department of Social Services could help prevent deaths such as that of 2-month- old David Carr, whose fatal beating was detailed in The Sun on Sunday. "As illustrated in recent local media reports, far too many children are being abused while on the watch of the Department of Social Services," Beilenson wrote in a report released yesterday.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 3, 2014
An Aberdeen woman received a 25-year prison sentence Thursday for the severe beating of her infant daughter in 2012. In January, a Harford County jury found Kayla Marie Barker, 25, guilty of first-degree child abuse and neglecting a minor. She was sentenced by Harford Circuit Court Judge Stephen M. Waldron. Police investigations and subsequent testimony at her trial disclosed Barker, then 23, had repeatedly beaten her 9-month-old daughter in May 2012 because the child would not stop crying.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
In November 2002, a health counselor called the Baltimore Department of Social Services in fear, warning that a 22-year-old mother convicted of breaking her baby's arms and legs had abandoned a court-ordered psychiatric treatment program. The nonprofit Healthy Start program alerted Social Services that Keisha L. Carr might injure her son again. Carr was suffering from severe depression but often didn't take her medication. And she was about to give birth to another child, which her counselors feared could trigger a mental crisis that could put her 1-year-old son and the newborn at risk.
NEWS
By Mark Shriver | August 30, 2012
The earthquake struck without warning during children's naptime. Fortunately, Judy Tribby and her fellow staff members at the YMCA-Arc child care center in Bowie knew exactly what to do last August, when the ground started to shake. Within seconds, well before the crying children were fully awake, the caregivers began placing infants and toddlers into evacuation cribs. They grabbed ready-to-go emergency bags prepared for each child and quickly moved all 40 children, including a number of children with disabilities, into the main hallway away from the windows.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | October 7, 1993
Fifty new reports of child abuse and neglect landed on the desks of Anne Arundel County's child protective services workers Tuesday, setting a record and sending social workers scrambling."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Gadi Dechter and Julie Bykowicz and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporters | January 11, 2008
Disturbed that child protective services failed to prevent the death of a 2-year-old city girl despite previous investigations of her mother for child abuse and neglect, Baltimore lawmakers said yesterday that immediate legislation is needed to better track such cases. The calls to monitor abusive women for new pregnancies came amid an investigation by Maryland's Department of Human Resources into the agency's handling of Bryanna Harris, who police say died in June after ingesting methadone and being dealt a blow to her abdomen.
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2004
The city's Department of Social Services has begun staffing its downtown office around the clock to be better prepared to respond to reports of child abuse, city officials announced yesterday. Since Wednesday, department child welfare caseworkers in the Child Protective Services division have been monitoring phones 24 hours a day at the 1900 N. Howard St. office. They also will be available to go to scenes of alleged abuse seven days a week, said Norris West, a spokesman for the state Department of Human Resources.
NEWS
June 6, 2000
THE PLIGHT of too many children in the United States is Dickensian: In these best of times, for them it's the worst of times. Despite our unprecedented economic prosperity, nearly one in five American children still lives in poverty. That's why it's important to help at-risk kids by bolstering proven programs. House and Senate panels have rightly supported spending increases for the child care development grant, which primarily provides families with day-care vouchers. And for Head Start, too, which educates 3- and 4-year-olds, offers health and nutrition programs -- and links families to myriad resources that can help lift them from poverty.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2008
Child Protective Services had already taken two of her daughters, but Vernice Harris was raising her third girl amid squalor and boarded-up rowhouses on East 25th Street. Apparently frustrated that the crying 2-year-old was disturbing her and her drug-addicted friends, Harris began giving the girl methadone to keep her quiet, according to police charging documents. Harris told authorities that she found the girl unresponsive in an upstairs bedroom about 3 a.m. June 5. She carried the toddler downstairs, where friends and paramedics were unable to revive her. Two months later, medical examiners ruled that Bryanna Ashley Harris' death was the result of a methadone overdose and a beating to her stomach.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Melissa Harris and Julie Bykowicz and Melissa Harris,Sun reporters | January 10, 2008
The head of Maryland's Department of Human Resources ordered an investigation yesterday into the agency's handling of a 2-year-old girl whose mother has been charged with her murder. Twice in Bryanna Harris' short life, social workers investigated whether her mother was neglecting her. Vernice Harris had abused and neglected her two older daughters, court documents show, prompting Baltimore's child protective services to take custody of them in 2002. In a half-dozen court orders about the welfare of those girls, no mention is made of their baby sister.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2008
The 9-year-old boy went outside without his godmother's permission. His punishment was to sit in a bathtub as the woman filled it with five pots of boiling water. When he emerged from the scalding water, the lower half of his body was covered in severe burns. The woman waited four days to take him to a hospital. The facts read into the court record during Shamia Lawson's plea agreement in November were horrific, making her punishment yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court all the more shocking to city prosecutors and the boy's relatives: six months behind bars.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Gadi Dechter and Julie Bykowicz and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporters | January 11, 2008
Disturbed that child protective services failed to prevent the death of a 2-year-old city girl despite previous investigations of her mother for child abuse and neglect, Baltimore lawmakers said yesterday that immediate legislation is needed to better track such cases. The calls to monitor abusive women for new pregnancies came amid an investigation by Maryland's Department of Human Resources into the agency's handling of Bryanna Harris, who police say died in June after ingesting methadone and being dealt a blow to her abdomen.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Melissa Harris and Julie Bykowicz and Melissa Harris,Sun reporters | January 10, 2008
The head of Maryland's Department of Human Resources ordered an investigation yesterday into the agency's handling of a 2-year-old girl whose mother has been charged with her murder. Twice in Bryanna Harris' short life, social workers investigated whether her mother was neglecting her. Vernice Harris had abused and neglected her two older daughters, court documents show, prompting Baltimore's child protective services to take custody of them in 2002. In a half-dozen court orders about the welfare of those girls, no mention is made of their baby sister.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2008
Child Protective Services had already taken two of her daughters, but Vernice Harris was raising her third girl amid squalor and boarded-up rowhouses on East 25th Street. Apparently frustrated that the crying 2-year-old was disturbing her and her drug-addicted friends, Harris began giving the girl methadone to keep her quiet, according to police charging documents. Harris told authorities that she found the girl unresponsive in an upstairs bedroom about 3 a.m. June 5. She carried the toddler downstairs, where friends and paramedics were unable to revive her. Two months later, medical examiners ruled that Bryanna Ashley Harris' death was the result of a methadone overdose and a beating to her stomach.
NEWS
February 5, 2006
Child welfare system is failing nationwide Like so many other cases facing the U.S. child welfare system, the death of 7-year-old Nixzmary Brown, who was beaten to death by her stepfather in New York, is a tragedy ("Experts fear `foster-care panic,'" Jan. 29). This tragedy raises two key issues. First, why should some of the child protective services workers who handled the case be suspended when they did the best job they could with the resources they were given? It is well-documented that child protective services workers are overburdened by high caseloads, which makes it difficult to thoroughly investigate all reported cases of abuse and neglect.
NEWS
April 16, 2005
D. GRETHEN Improving foster care Despite great odds and great scrutiny of the state's handling of our most vulnerable children, the Ehrlich administration has made significant progress toward improving the care of children in the last two years. Our achievements include: Opening the first 24/7 child protective services intake operation ever at the Baltimore City Department of Social Services to help victims of child abuse and neglect, regardless of the time of day. Hiring enough child welfare caseworkers to substantially meet Child Welfare League of America staffing ratios.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Andrea F. Siegel and Carol L. Bowers and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writers | October 19, 1993
A member of the Board of Education and the president of the County Council of PTAs are calling for an independent probe into how well the Anne Arundel County Department of Social Services has handled child abuse complaints, now that a fourth teacher has been charged with child sex abuse."
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2004
The city's Department of Social Services has begun staffing its downtown office around the clock to be better prepared to respond to reports of child abuse, city officials announced yesterday. Since Wednesday, department child welfare caseworkers in the Child Protective Services division have been monitoring phones 24 hours a day at the 1900 N. Howard St. office. They also will be available to go to scenes of alleged abuse seven days a week, said Norris West, a spokesman for the state Department of Human Resources.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2004
A 17-year-old girl and a 24-year-old man living in the basement of a vacant Northeast Baltimore rowhouse have been charged with the beating deaths of their 1-month-old twin girls. Sierra Swann and Nathaniel Broadway, both of the 1900 block of E. 31st St., have been charged with first-degree murder and child abuse causing death, said Baltimore police spokesman Officer Troy Harris. Their daughters, Emonney and Emunnea Broadway, were pronounced dead shortly after being taken by ambulance to Johns Hopkins Hospital on Tuesday night.
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