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NEWS
June 10, 2014
Timothy Wheeler and Meredith Cohn 's article on lead-paint lawsuits underscores a much larger issue in Baltimore: Most lead-poisoned children live in poverty ( "Lead-paint lawsuits dogs Kennedy Krieger," June 7). Adverse childhood experiences such as community violence, discrimination, parental separation and divorce, incarceration and malnutrition are increasingly appreciated as circumstances that make children more vulnerable to environmental toxins like lead. Lead abatement doesn't completely remove lead from homes.
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NEWS
June 10, 2014
Timothy Wheeler and Meredith Cohn 's article on lead-paint lawsuits underscores a much larger issue in Baltimore: Most lead-poisoned children live in poverty ( "Lead-paint lawsuits dogs Kennedy Krieger," June 7). Adverse childhood experiences such as community violence, discrimination, parental separation and divorce, incarceration and malnutrition are increasingly appreciated as circumstances that make children more vulnerable to environmental toxins like lead. Lead abatement doesn't completely remove lead from homes.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
Maryland has one of the lowest rates of childhood poverty in the nation, but is in the middle of the pack in overall children's well-being, according to a report released Wednesday by the Baltimore-basedAnnie E. Casey Foundation. The state is 23rd overall in the 2011 Kids Count Data Book, an annual assessment of child welfare organized with the help of local child advocacy groups. Maryland ranks two spots better than last year's report, but continues to have relatively high child and infant death rankings.
NEWS
By Mark Shriver and Jim Grossfeld | January 12, 2014
Fifty years after the first, it's time to launch a new War on Poverty. But to do it we need to challenge myths about the first that have convinced too many that combating poverty is just one more phenomenon of the '60s that can never happen again. Patricia's smile lights up the office of Maryland Hunger Solutions in Baltimore. It's easy to see why the homebound disabled and elderly she cares for look forward to her visits. But ask Patricia whether she earns enough to care for herself and her two children, ages 10 and 12, and her smile slips away.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Vanni | June 16, 2000
HUNDREDS OF low-income advocates and administrators of fuel funds throughout the country were in Los Angeles this week tackling the issues of child poverty and the meaning of bill payment assistance, weatherization of houses and past-due utility bills in a restructured electric industry. In the midst of this five-day conference that ended yesterday, news from Baltimore of the death of the three children and their grandmother from the fire on Amity Street is a poignant reminder to all of us that the safety net for families living in poverty is truly frayed.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 19, 2012
America's children seem to be shortchanged on almost every issue we face as a society. Not only are we failing to protect our children from deranged people wielding semi-automatic guns, we're not protecting them from poverty. The rate of child poverty keeps rising -- even faster than the rate of adult poverty. We now have the highest rate of child poverty in the developed world. And we're not protecting their health. Rates of child diabetes and asthma continue to climb. America has the third-worst rate of infant mortality among 30 industrialized nations and the second-highest rate of teenage pregnancy, after Mexico.
NEWS
By Mark Shriver and Jim Grossfeld | January 12, 2014
Fifty years after the first, it's time to launch a new War on Poverty. But to do it we need to challenge myths about the first that have convinced too many that combating poverty is just one more phenomenon of the '60s that can never happen again. Patricia's smile lights up the office of Maryland Hunger Solutions in Baltimore. It's easy to see why the homebound disabled and elderly she cares for look forward to her visits. But ask Patricia whether she earns enough to care for herself and her two children, ages 10 and 12, and her smile slips away.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 30, 2013
It's the season to show concern for the less fortunate among us. We should also be concerned about the widening gap between the most fortunate and everyone else. Although it's still possible to win the lottery (your chance of winning $648 million in the recent Mega Millions sweepstakes was one in 259 million), the biggest lottery of all is what family we're born into. Our chances in life are now determined to an unprecedented degree by the wealth of our parents. That's not always been the case.
NEWS
By Ben Meyerson and Ben Meyerson,Capital News Service | January 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Maryland had the lowest percentage of children younger than 5 living in poverty of any of the United States in 2005, according to new estimates from the Census Bureau. The survey said 12.2 percent of children younger than 5 lived below the poverty line in Maryland, compared with a national average of 21.3 percent, according to a survey released by the Census Bureau's Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates program. Maryland also had the second-lowest overall poverty rate in the nation, as well as the second-highest median household income, according to the survey.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2000
Marian Wright Edelman challenged those receiving diplomas from Goucher College yesterday not to forget about the children, delivering a stern lecture in a steamy gymnasium overflowing with excited graduates and proud parents. Goucher's 109th commencement, moved inside by the rain, launched the Baltimore area graduation season. The school in Towson handed out 235 bachelor's degrees and 56 master's degrees, conferring honorary doctorates on Baltimore school board President J. Tyson Tildon, Goucher alumna Ruth B. Fein, former president of the American Jewish Historical Society, and Edelman, founder and president of the Children's Defense Fund.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 30, 2013
It's the season to show concern for the less fortunate among us. We should also be concerned about the widening gap between the most fortunate and everyone else. Although it's still possible to win the lottery (your chance of winning $648 million in the recent Mega Millions sweepstakes was one in 259 million), the biggest lottery of all is what family we're born into. Our chances in life are now determined to an unprecedented degree by the wealth of our parents. That's not always been the case.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 19, 2012
America's children seem to be shortchanged on almost every issue we face as a society. Not only are we failing to protect our children from deranged people wielding semi-automatic guns, we're not protecting them from poverty. The rate of child poverty keeps rising -- even faster than the rate of adult poverty. We now have the highest rate of child poverty in the developed world. And we're not protecting their health. Rates of child diabetes and asthma continue to climb. America has the third-worst rate of infant mortality among 30 industrialized nations and the second-highest rate of teenage pregnancy, after Mexico.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
Maryland has one of the lowest rates of childhood poverty in the nation, but is in the middle of the pack in overall children's well-being, according to a report released Wednesday by the Baltimore-basedAnnie E. Casey Foundation. The state is 23rd overall in the 2011 Kids Count Data Book, an annual assessment of child welfare organized with the help of local child advocacy groups. Maryland ranks two spots better than last year's report, but continues to have relatively high child and infant death rankings.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | September 30, 2009
Despite a decrease in poverty among city children, nearly one in five Baltimore residents were living below federal poverty levels in 2008, according to Census Bureau data released Tuesday. Census Bureau data showed that 19 percent of Baltimore's population lived in poverty last year, putting Maryland's most populous city well above the national rate of 13 percent. The city data are in line with figures from 2007, but a 3 percent decrease in the number of city children living in poverty last year left local analysts searching for answers to what they call a statistical anomaly amid a sagging economy and the rise of unemployment in the area.
NEWS
By Ben Meyerson and Ben Meyerson,Capital News Service | January 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Maryland had the lowest percentage of children younger than 5 living in poverty of any of the United States in 2005, according to new estimates from the Census Bureau. The survey said 12.2 percent of children younger than 5 lived below the poverty line in Maryland, compared with a national average of 21.3 percent, according to a survey released by the Census Bureau's Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates program. Maryland also had the second-lowest overall poverty rate in the nation, as well as the second-highest median household income, according to the survey.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
Maryland's child poverty rate is 6.7 percent, the lowest in the nation - or it's twice that, according to a new census report. It's either gone down since 1990 - or it's gone up, depending on whether you listen to state officials or to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which releases a national report on the subject this morning. Even the U.S. Census Bureau, which produced the different surveys that each entity is relying on, can't say who is right. "In terms of who's more correct, I would say ... I'm not sure you can answer that question," said Chuck Nelson, a census economist and expert on its poverty statistics.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
Maryland's child poverty rate is 6.7 percent, the lowest in the nation - or it's twice that, according to a new census report. It's either gone down since 1990 - or it's gone up, depending on whether you listen to state officials or to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which releases a national report on the subject this morning. Even the U.S. Census Bureau, which produced the different surveys that each entity is relying on, can't say who is right. "In terms of who's more correct, I would say ... I'm not sure you can answer that question," said Chuck Nelson, a census economist and expert on its poverty statistics.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
An annual survey that monitors the well-being of Maryland's children has found slight improvements in the rates of infant mortality and teen pregnancy.But the survey released last week also shows alarming increases in violence against children and the number of children living in poverty.The 1995 Maryland's Kids Count Factbook, a four-year survey funded by the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation, found improvement in 10 of 14 indicators used to measure the well-being of children in the areas of economics, health, safety and education.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Vanni | June 16, 2000
HUNDREDS OF low-income advocates and administrators of fuel funds throughout the country were in Los Angeles this week tackling the issues of child poverty and the meaning of bill payment assistance, weatherization of houses and past-due utility bills in a restructured electric industry. In the midst of this five-day conference that ended yesterday, news from Baltimore of the death of the three children and their grandmother from the fire on Amity Street is a poignant reminder to all of us that the safety net for families living in poverty is truly frayed.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2000
Marian Wright Edelman challenged those receiving diplomas from Goucher College yesterday not to forget about the children, delivering a stern lecture in a steamy gymnasium overflowing with excited graduates and proud parents. Goucher's 109th commencement, moved inside by the rain, launched the Baltimore area graduation season. The school in Towson handed out 235 bachelor's degrees and 56 master's degrees, conferring honorary doctorates on Baltimore school board President J. Tyson Tildon, Goucher alumna Ruth B. Fein, former president of the American Jewish Historical Society, and Edelman, founder and president of the Children's Defense Fund.
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