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Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
A McDonald's franchise owner in Baltimore County must pay nearly $30,500 in back wages and child labor penalties because he failed to pay overtime and broke child labor laws, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The department reported that Bill Taylor, president of B&D Taylor Inc., which owns the McDonald's on Sweet Air Road in Phoenix, has paid $20,502.05 in back wages to five workers, two of whom are still in his employ. The workers were not compensated for overtime hours, federal officials said.
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NEWS
August 15, 2014
Pro-Palestinian activists in many countries recently have been actively protesting Israel's military operations in Gaza. They burn Israeli flags, throw stones at synagogues, call for academic boycotts of Israel's universities and shout "death to Israel and Jews" ( "Turkish activists say new flotilla to challenge Israeli blockade of Gaza," Aug. 11). How about a demand for Hamas to stop launching thousands of rockets targeting Israeli civilians since 2005, the year when Israel left Gaza?
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NEWS
By Jonathan Power | February 16, 1996
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- Some things have changed as Turkey has moved from Third World country to the makings of a powerful industrial economy, banging on the gates of Europe as surely as did the armies of the Ottomans 300 years ago.The last time I was here you'd sit in a restaurant by the Bosporus and as you finished them off you'd throw your empty wine bottles out the open window into the fast-moving current. Things are tidier now.Tidier, too, is the child-labor situation. There are health and welfare safeguards that did not exist on my last visit.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Operators of nine McDonald's in the Baltimore area and on the Eastern Shore agreed to pay more than $250,000 in back wages and damages to 138 workers for violations of minimum wage, overtime and child labor provisions, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday. Annapolis-based franchise operators Gold Hat Inc. and Gold Hat II Inc., which have the same owner, will also pay $4,300 in civil penalties for the child labor violations, under the agreement. "The restaurant industry employs some of the most at-risk workers that we see," Mark Lara, director of the Labor Department's wage and hour division's Baltimore district office, said in a statement.
NEWS
July 18, 1995
The Howard County Friends of Central America and the Caribbean will sponsor a meeting and potluck dinner at 7 p.m. Friday at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center.The meeting will focus on the use of child labor in Central America for the benefit of the United States garment industry.Speakers include Judith Yanira Viera of El Salvador; Claudia Leticia Molina of Honduras, and Charles Kernaghan, executive director of the National Labor Committee in Central America.The labor committee is sponsoring a national tour by Ms. Viera and Ms. Molina.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1997
The U.S. Department of Labor said yesterday that it is assessing a $14,100 fine against a Chestertown poultry processing plant for child labor violations.Mark L. Fisher, president of Chestertown Foods Inc., said the plant had not violated any rules and would appeal the fine to an administrative hearing. "We followed all applicable hiring practices, including requiring identification," he said.The Labor Department cited Chestertown Foods for 24 violations, involving hiring nine workers ages 13 to 15 years.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | December 21, 1991
U.S. Labor Department crackdowns on child labor violations and an expanding pool of unemployed older workers have caused many restaurants in Maryland and around the country to stop hiring youths under age 16.Meanwhile, child labor violations in the food service industry are likely to continue until antiquated federal laws are changed, restaurant operators admit.Under federal law, 14- and 15-year-olds can work only 18 hours a week and have to stop work at 7 p.m. -- the middle of the busy dinner period -- during the school year.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | December 16, 1990
NEW YORK -- Behind a cramped and noisy garment shop, sandwiched between old three-decker homes in a section of Queens, 9-year-old Guang Jiang is spending his day hunched over a work bench helping his father stitch women's dresses together.He is being paid 25 cents an hour."My son comes to the factory to help me count the garment material," his father, Kong Jiang, told a state garment industry inspector. Said the boy, in newly learned English: "I just come to work when my father tell me to do so, to make easy for my father to work faster."
NEWS
August 12, 1996
AS KATHIE LEE GIFFORD tells it, a few weeks ago she was merely a talk-show entertainer and guilt-free celebrity endorser of products and services. Now, she says, she is chastened but eager to contribute to the fight to stamp out child labor around the world.Ms. Gifford's awakening came rather harshly, after negative publicity -- that dreaded bane of endorsers -- revealed that her line of clothing was being manufactured in sweat shops using child labor in Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua and New York City.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | October 15, 1990
After four days of sweeps by federal inspectors earlier this year, the Labor Department has fined 43 Maryland employers more than $45,000 for child labor law violations involving nearly 200 minors.Violations were found at 40 percent of the 110 establishments checked, virtually all of them in food service and sales, the agency reported.Most of the alleged violations involved 14- and 15-year-olds who worked too many hours or too late at night. Federal law limits them to 18 hours weekly during the school year, working no later than 7 p.m.; they may work 40 hours a week during vacation.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Steve Cibor loaded his Ford Explorer with a few samples of Tibetan rugs and drove for days along the East Coast in 1994, trying to persuade retailers to sell the expensive hand-woven pieces. "Nobody bought it - but they gave me ideas," Cibor said. "In the rug industry, people know what will sell. " Tamarian Carpets, the Baltimore-based rug importer and design company Cibor founded, has come a long way in the 20 years since then. The company is now a top rug exporter from Nepal, where the ancient craft of rug making is one of the country's biggest industries.
NEWS
Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
A McDonald's franchise owner in Baltimore County must pay nearly $30,500 in back wages and child labor penalties because he failed to pay overtime and broke child labor laws, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The department reported that Bill Taylor, president of B&D Taylor Inc., which owns the McDonald's on Sweet Air Road in Phoenix, has paid $20,502.05 in back wages to five workers, two of whom are still in his employ. The workers were not compensated for overtime hours, federal officials said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | May 30, 2008
Catherine Myers, a retired paint laboratory technician whom Nazi soldiers forced to work at a labor camp during World War II, died of heart disease in her sleep Monday at Locust Lodge in Riviera Beach. The Pasadena resident was 77. Born Katarzyna Prokopczyk, she was raised in a village about 25 miles outside Pinsk, Poland. She lived in a log cabin lighted by a kerosene lamp and heated by a wood stove. By the time she was 8, she was learning Russian in her village school as Soviet soldiers were beginning to occupy Poland.
FEATURES
By Maria Elena Fernandez and Maria Elena Fernandez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2007
Just when Americans thought they had seen it all when it comes to reality television, CBS has come up with a humdinger: Kid Nation. For 40 days in April and May, CBS sent 40 children, ages 8 to 15, to a former ghost town in New Mexico to build a society from scratch. With no access to their parents, not even by telephone, the children set up their own government, laws and society in front of reality television cameras. But CBS, the network that got the reality ball rolling in 2000 with Survivor, had more in mind when it decided to run this social experiment of sorts.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2005
Nike Inc., once a principal target of activists protesting the use of sweatshop labor, has been pardoned by investment firms that screen companies for their social and environmental records. The Bethesda-based Calvert Group mutual fund company announced yesterday that Nike now meets its standards for being a good corporate citizen. KLD Research & Analytics Inc., a Boston firm that provides research to institutional investors, also determined earlier this summer that Nike has become an acceptable investment for the socially conscious.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2003
Robin S. Biddison, a former high school teacher who worked to protect children from labor abuse in the Depression era, died of heart failure Thursday at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson, where she resided for the past 11 years. The former Belvedere Square resident was 95. Born Robin Smith in Reading, Pa., and raised in Wyomissing, Pa., she was a 1929 graduate of Goucher College, where she earned a liberal arts degree and belonged to Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority. In 1930, she was awarded a Rockefeller Foundation traveling fellowship in vocational guidance.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2003
Robin S. Biddison, a former high school teacher who worked to protect children from labor abuse in the Depression era, died of heart failure Thursday at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson, where she resided for the past 11 years. The former Belvedere Square resident was 95. Born Robin Smith in Reading, Pa., and raised in Wyomissing, Pa., she was a 1929 graduate of Goucher College, where she earned a liberal arts degree and belonged to Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority. In 1930, she was awarded a Rockefeller Foundation traveling fellowship in vocational guidance.
NEWS
June 13, 1998
THERE WAS a time when all children worked from an early age, whether around the hearth or in the fields. But after reformers attacked the worst excesses of the Industrial Age, when less fortunate children were forced into factory work and other unsuitable jobs, governments in developed countries passed laws to make sure that their young people were at school, not at work.Despite a consensus in much of the world that childhood should be reserved for schooling and that children should be spared the burdens of wage-earning, a recent report from the International Labor Organization highlights the persistence of the problem.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
Though most of the University of Baltimore graduates seated before him yesterday were receiving degrees from the Merrick School of Business - and probably hoping for good management positions as a result - John J. Sweeney put in a plug for working for a union. "We pay real money for real work," the president of the AFL-CIO told a commencement gathering at the Lyric Opera House. "But I can assure you the psychic income that comes from making a real difference is worth much more than the money."
NEWS
June 13, 1998
THERE WAS a time when all children worked from an early age, whether around the hearth or in the fields. But after reformers attacked the worst excesses of the Industrial Age, when less fortunate children were forced into factory work and other unsuitable jobs, governments in developed countries passed laws to make sure that their young people were at school, not at work.Despite a consensus in much of the world that childhood should be reserved for schooling and that children should be spared the burdens of wage-earning, a recent report from the International Labor Organization highlights the persistence of the problem.
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