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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 11, 2009
Mary Pat Lennon, a retired social worker who specialized in child development and family therapy, died of glioblastoma, a malignant brain tumor, Dec. 31 at her Homeland residence. She was 59. Born and raised in Lumberton, N.C., Ms. Lennon was a 1968 graduate of Lumberton High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in psychology from Salem College in Winston-Salem, N.C., in 1972, she moved to Washington and joined the staff of Maine Sen. William S. Cohen, and later worked for U.S. News and World Report.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
It seems that just about all kids, from toddlers to teenagers, have a smartphone, tablet or other device in their hands at one time or another. But too much screen time might not be healthy, especially if it's replacing physical activities or interfering with personal relationships or homework. Dr. Timothy F. Doran, chairman of pediatrics at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson, explains how much might be too much and what to do instead. There are so many devices available now and kids love them.
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NEWS
By Darryl E. Owens and Darryl E. Owens,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 12, 2000
Meet Justin, your average flaxen-haired 18-year-old. Justin's into trucks, Dr. Pepper and Chinese food. He also digs girls with blond hair, a nice smile and a sense of humor. Justin possesses hazel eyes, stands 6 feet, and is a Gemini. This teen-age "hottie" from the Lone Star State is also card (NU)340 -- one of the 363 lads whose mugs appear on trading cards featured in a new game for girls called Boy Crazy! The game is aimed at girls 10 and up as an alternative to Pokemon and Magic: The Gathering, two trading-card games sometimes favored by boys.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Roughly 13 minutes into a science experiment involving sets of blocks, Dorian Larkins, who at that moment is two weeks shy of his third birthday, has had enough. He would rather play with the trains in the waiting room, and he says he has to pee. But at his mother's urging, he soldiers on for another five minutes or so until the session, which looks at toddler memory, wraps up. His mom believes it's imperative that Dorian participate in the work of the Laboratory for Child Development at Johns Hopkins University - but less so for her son's sake than for the researcher's.
NEWS
By Daniel Goleman and Daniel Goleman,New York Times News Service Eileen Canzian of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | July 30, 1991
Faced with the dilemma of the high number of girls in their early teens who are becoming pregnant, experts have come forward with a theory that these young mothers are responding to a pattern in human evolution that induces people growing up in extremely stressful circumstances to bear children early and often.The theory has received considerable attention and criticism.Drawing on sociobiology, the theory holds that teen-age mothers -- especially in America's inner cities -- are implementing a reproductive strategy that from an evolutionary viewpoint is a smart bet.Children who grow up in dangerous conditions, the theory holds, are primed to boost the chances of having their genes survive into the nextgeneration by choosing earlier sex, earlier motherhood and more children.
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 1997
When my 4 1/2 -year-old gets upset, sad, mad or frustrated, she pouts. Is this just a phase she is going through, or is she destined for a lifetime of being a sourpuss? What should we do?Julie Bonner,Buffalo, N.Y.Most of the parents who called Child Life deal with their children's pouting episodes either by ignoring them or sending the offenders to their rooms until they get into a better mood.This usually works and is certainly one approach for handling the situation. But if we can step back and think about why the child is pouting, we can see this as an opportunity to teach the child how to deal appropriately with unpleasant emotions.
EXPLORE
April 24, 2013
Bill and Yvette Martino of Forest Hill announce the engagement of their daughter, Ashley, to Adam Craig Downs, son of Bonnie Demski and Craig Downs. Downs is in the field of automotive repair and graduated from Fallston High School in 2002. Martino works in child development and graduated from Harford Community College in 2013. The couple plan to marry in August 2014.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | August 26, 1991
Fort Meade has closed one of two child development centers on base because it did not meet Defense Department requirements, but officialssay the disruption will not leave additional children without care.A base spokesman said there are still 500 children on a waiting list for child care -- the same number as before the facility closed --but some will be housed in a temporary facility that could be in place by next year.The old building, at 13th and Chamberlin streets, had been used as a child-care center for 25 years.
NEWS
November 4, 1996
Louise Bates Ames,88, founder of the Gesell Institute of Human Development and a pioneer in child development studies, died Thursday of thyroid cancer in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her research showed that children go through "phases" of development and that the age of a child can be characterized by his or her temperament.At the Yale University Clinic of Child Development, Ames became a research assistant to Dr. Arnold Gesell and did thesis work on stages of crawling in infants.She founded the Gesell Institute of Human Development in 1950 with Dr. Frances Ilg and Dr. Janet Rodell.
NEWS
December 4, 2005
South Carroll High School students in Spanish II and Child Development classes will participate in a cross-curricular lesson tomorrow. Spanish students have written bilingual children's stories that they will share with 4-year-old Child Development children. Sarah Hash, a sophomore in the Child Development program and a Spanish student, is creating a lesson for the preschoolers on "Knowing Your World/Community." Hash and Spanish teacher Patricia Keenan created a lesson in which the Spanish students, who wrote the storybooks, will be partnered with a small group of 4-year-olds to teach a Spanish word, then to read the story in Spanish and English.
EXPLORE
April 24, 2013
Bill and Yvette Martino of Forest Hill announce the engagement of their daughter, Ashley, to Adam Craig Downs, son of Bonnie Demski and Craig Downs. Downs is in the field of automotive repair and graduated from Fallston High School in 2002. Martino works in child development and graduated from Harford Community College in 2013. The couple plan to marry in August 2014.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 13, 2012
Baltimore's school children call her "The Sex Lady," and during the four decades Deborah Roffman has taught them about their bodies, the only thing that hasn't changed is the discomfort of their parents when they try to talk about sex. Even the sex has changed, becoming casual and transactional, invasive and pervasive. Marketing and advertising have driven the mercury higher. Technology has put sex only a touch or a keystroke away. "The boundaries that used to separate children's lives from adults' lives have in many respects vanished," said Ms. Roffman, who has taught at Park School for 38 years and often teaches at other independent schools locally and nationwide.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | May 20, 2012
Faith Child Development Center's pre-kindergarten class celebrated its graduation ceremony May 16. Colorful graduation hats decorated the bulletin board and graduation streamers hung from the ceiling. But the mood was far from cheerful after the event, as the staff of the school shut its doors to students and their families for the last time. On May 11, Faith Lutheran Church announced that Faith Child Development Center, which has offered classes for ages 2 through pre-k for 12 years, would not reopen next school year.
EXPLORE
March 8, 2012
Open Arms Christian Child Development Center will hold an open house for parents and prospective students on Tuesday, March 27 from 9-11 a.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 13611 Laurel-Bowie Road. Classes for 3 year olds meet Tuesdays and Thursdays; and classes for 4 year olds meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. For more information, call the school at 240-568-9352.
EXPLORE
August 17, 2011
The Open Arms Child Development Center at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 13611 Laurel Bowie Road, is excited to welcome a new director and assistant director. The new director, Rachel Clark , comes to the center from Atwood, Ala., where she was the lead teacher in a Head Start program. She has also served as an educator and administrator at Cross of Calvary Lutheran School in Memphis, Tenn. Clark holds a Bachelor of Science in early childhood education and additional child development credentials.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Community members needed The Columbia Association is seeking community members to serve on an Aquatics Master Plan Task Force that will provide guidance to the association as it develops the Aquatics Master Plan. The panel will work with the association to review and discuss alternatives, recommendations and priorities as they are developed. The master plan is a 10- to 20-year plan for the aquatics facilities. Interested community members apply online at columbiaassociation.org/aquaticsmasterplan/application.pdf.
NEWS
July 11, 2008
Man killed by train is identified Police have identified the man who was fatally struck by a freight train Wednesday night as Don Sherman, 40, of the 9600 block of Conmar Road in Middle River. Investigators were trying yesterday to determine why Sherman was on the CSX tracks at Middle River Road and Pulaski Highway, said Cpl. Michael Hill, a police spokesman. The accident occurred about 8:50 p.m. Wednesday, he said. Maryland Frederick Ex-YMCA worker charged in abuse Police in Frederick have charged a former YMCA child-care worker with second-degree child abuse and second-degree assault.
FEATURES
By Janine DeFao and Janine DeFao,McClatchy News Service | June 27, 1994
With the opening of Disney's much-heralded "The Lion King," some parents may worry that hidden among catchy tunes and state-of-the-art animation lurks a danger to little psyches.Some critics have greeted Disney's 32nd animated film with warnings about the lion king's "disturbing on-screen death" and "scenes of truly terrifying animal kingdom violence."Early in the film, its hero, the precious lion cub, Simba, loses his father in a wildebeest stampede provoked by his evil uncle Scar, who wants to be king.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 11, 2009
Mary Pat Lennon, a retired social worker who specialized in child development and family therapy, died of glioblastoma, a malignant brain tumor, Dec. 31 at her Homeland residence. She was 59. Born and raised in Lumberton, N.C., Ms. Lennon was a 1968 graduate of Lumberton High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in psychology from Salem College in Winston-Salem, N.C., in 1972, she moved to Washington and joined the staff of Maine Sen. William S. Cohen, and later worked for U.S. News and World Report.
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