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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
Two-and-a-half years after 15-year-old Ciara Jobes was found beaten and starved to death on the kitchen floor of her guardian's East Baltimore home, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signed into law yesterday a sweeping reform of Maryland's approach to legal guardianship. State Sen. Lisa A. Gladden, a former child lawyer and Baltimore Democrat who sponsored the legislation, brought along an oversized photograph of Ciara to the bill signing. "Ciara is smiling down from heaven today," Gladden said.
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NEWS
By STEPHANIE DESMON and STEPHANIE DESMON,SUN REPORTER | February 22, 2006
Court-appointed attorneys who represent children in nasty custody battles should be immune from most malpractice claims since they are especially vulnerable to frivolous suits because one parent is bound to be unhappy with the findings they present to a judge, legal professionals told a state Senate committee yesterday. Such immunity from lawsuits had long been assumed for what are called "guardians ad litem" or "best-interest attorneys." But last month, Maryland's highest court ruled they could be sued for malpractice, just like any other attorney.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court issued a sweeping declaration of constitutional liberty for gay men and lesbians yesterday, overruling a Texas sodomy law in the broadest possible terms and effectively apologizing for a contrary 1986 decision that the majority said "demeans the lives of homosexual persons." The vote was 6-3. Gay people are "entitled to respect for their private lives," Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said for the court. "The state cannot demean their existence or control their destiny by making their private sexual conduct a crime."
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
A gay father has been granted a Circuit Court hearing in Maryland to determine the constitutionality of a Virginia court order that forced his partner to move out of the house they shared as a condition for keeping custody of his son. Maryland's Court of Special Appeals said the Montgomery County Circuit Court must hear evidence presented by attorneys for the father, Karl Ulf Hedberg of Rockville, before deciding on a custody agreement. The boy is 12 years old. Hedberg's attorney, Susan Sommer of the New York-based Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund - a gay-rights organization - lauded the ruling by Maryland's second-highest court.
FEATURES
By Jack Kroll and Jack Kroll,Newsweek | August 25, 1992
Amid a bombardment of tabloid missiles and an outpouring of accusations and counteraccusations, Woody Allen decided to talk with Newsweek about his relationship with Mia Farrow, with her children and his, and with Soon-Yi. He also responded to the accusations of abuse of his adopted daughter Dylan. Following is an excerpt from the three and a half hour interview in his Fifth Avenue penthouse apartment.Q: The question most people are concerned about is Mia Farrow's charge that you sexually molested Dylan.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | April 12, 1993
For movie stars Woody Allen and Mia Farrow, it appears that art and courtroom battles imitate real life.Their bitter child custody hearing, reminiscent of a soap opera plot with daily charges and countercharges, is just taking place on a much larger scale and stage than other cases of a similar nature, according to several attorneys who specialize in family law."It is fairly typical," said H. Joseph Gitlin, a Woodstock, Ill., lawyer and the author of "Gitlin on Divorce," a book on domestic relations law. "Child custody is total warfare.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Eight people hung posters on the Anne Arundel County Circuit Courthouse fence yesterday and gathered signatures on a petition calling for passage of a law that would set up a Family Division within circuit courts to handle divorces and child custody disputes.Such issues are handled as part of Maryland's regular Circuit Court caseload.In three hours yesterday morning, the demonstrators gathered about 150 signatures on petitions asking the state House Judiciary and the Senate Judicial Proceedings committees to approve bills to set up a Family Division.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | September 12, 1990
The state has revoked the psychology license of Dennis M. Harrison, a practicing psychologist in Columbia who has enjoyed a national reputation as an expert in child custody and abuse cases.In a 53-page decision by the state's psychology board released to The Howard County Sun on Monday, the board stated that Harrison's license was revoked due to unprofessional and unethical conduct dating back to 1986.The decision stated that Harrison failed to follow requirements of confidentiality in some cases, did not complete evaluations and treatment for which he was paid, and in one case allowed his assistant -- a high school student -- to handle treatment sessions for him.The decision also said that Harrison repeatedly lied about his credentials, saying he had a doctorate in psychology.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- You have just gone through a bitter divorce and you want to take your mind off it, maybe with a little foreign travel. But if you are Jewish, you might want to rethink that trip to Israel.According to a warning issued by the State Department, Israel's religious courts have begun asserting jurisdiction in divorce, child custody, child support and other family matters involving Jews who are in the country temporarily, even for a week or two.The State Department says Americans have been prevented from leaving Israel for substantial periods until their cases are heard.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1996
A 17-month project designed to provide legal services to people embroiled in family disputes, including divorce cases, has found that as many as 12,000 such people in Maryland each year forego hiring a lawyer, often because they can't afford it.The needs of these people can be met with a range of lower-cost alternatives to traditional lawyering, according to a study conducted by the University of Maryland Law School's assisted pro se project.Among options suggested by the study are counseling sessions with law students trained in family law and increased use of mediation.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
Two-and-a-half years after 15-year-old Ciara Jobes was found beaten and starved to death on the kitchen floor of her guardian's East Baltimore home, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signed into law yesterday a sweeping reform of Maryland's approach to legal guardianship. State Sen. Lisa A. Gladden, a former child lawyer and Baltimore Democrat who sponsored the legislation, brought along an oversized photograph of Ciara to the bill signing. "Ciara is smiling down from heaven today," Gladden said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court issued a sweeping declaration of constitutional liberty for gay men and lesbians yesterday, overruling a Texas sodomy law in the broadest possible terms and effectively apologizing for a contrary 1986 decision that the majority said "demeans the lives of homosexual persons." The vote was 6-3. Gay people are "entitled to respect for their private lives," Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said for the court. "The state cannot demean their existence or control their destiny by making their private sexual conduct a crime."
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Laura Loh and Ryan Davis and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Annapolis Hollywood Video store manager Vicky McLaughlin wasn't sure what to make of the bandit pointing a silver-colored handgun at her and declaring, "I'm going to stand this place up." His gun looked real and he was dressed in all black, with a sweat shirt hood pulled tightly around his head. But this robber was 4 feet tall and weighed 70 pounds. He was 7 years old. And the weapon turned out to be a fake. "We're still in disbelief that somebody attempted to rob us - and it was a" 7-year-old, McLaughlin said of the Monday afternoon incident.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2002
Rodney Holm, a police officer, shared a five-bedroom home in Hildale, Utah, on the Arizona border, with his three wives and their 20 children. Then Holm's third and youngest wife, Ruth Stubbs, left in December, with their two children. Holm sued for custody of the children. That gave rise to a legal battle infused not only with the usual wrenching accusations of abuse and neglect but also with serious questions about religious freedom, sexual exploitation of teen-agers by religious institutions and a law enforcement official's obligations to obey the law in his personal life.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2002
Baltimore Circuit Judge John Carroll Byrnes stepped into the limelight weeks ago when he struck down the murder conviction of Michael Austin, helping to free a man jailed for 27 years. Byrnes' name was mentioned in publications and newscasts across the country. Yet the Austin case might not be the most remarkable decision of his career on the bench, which began 20 years ago and ended yesterday. Last week, as he packed his office on the second floor of Courthouse East, he looked over some of the thousands of cases he has presided over in the past two decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and By Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | June 17, 2001
"A Theory of Relativity," by Jacquelyn Mitchard, HarperCollins, 351 pages, $26. Since Solomon's time, it has been imperative that fictional stories of child custody must not find their resolutions in courtrooms. Legal decisions will be rendered, yes. But, ultimately, a greater law must come into play. Solomon will pretend he is going to cut a baby in half; the real mother will protest, proving her worth. Horton and Maisie will argue heatedly over the ownership of the egg, until a flying elephant emerges, settling the matter.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
A Baltimore judge is defending his actions in a 1996 case that gave a former Harford County woman temporary custody of someone else's child. Circuit Judge Joseph P. McCurdy said yesterday that he had no way of knowing that documents he relied on to make his decision had been falsified. McCurdy also blamed the mistake on established court procedures for child custody cases. "The way our Maryland rules are drafted and the way the common law is, it presumes at least people who make oaths and affidavits are telling the truth," McCurdy said.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1995
The tabloid headline said it all, summing up in just four words the child custody case that has grabbed the attention of working mothers everywhere: "BAD MOM, GOOD PROSECUTOR."It seems that Marcia Clark, the O. J. Simpson prosecutor, has been put on trial by her soon-to-be-ex-husband, Gordon Clark, for spending too much time working and not enough time with the kids. The custody battle has struck a nerve in working mothers everywhere, prompting responses ranging from fear to rage. Along with several other recent court rulings, the Marcia Clark case has alarmed working mothers who are beginning to fear they may have to choose between their child and their job.And such fears may have some foundation, say those who study gender and child custody.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
A Baltimore judge is defending his actions in a 1996 case that gave a former Harford County woman temporary custody of someone else's child. Circuit Judge Joseph P. McCurdy said yesterday that he had no way of knowing that documents he relied on to make his decision had been falsified. McCurdy also blamed the mistake on established court procedures for child custody cases. "The way our Maryland rules are drafted and the way the common law is, it presumes at least people who make oaths and affidavits are telling the truth," McCurdy said.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 2000
MIAMI BEACH-- Attorney General Janet Reno instructed the Miami relatives of Elian Gonzalez early this morning to bring the child to a local airport by 2 p.m. today to be flown to a long-delayed reunion with his father in the Washington area. But the 6-year-old boy's great-uncle, Lazaro Gonzalez, with whom Elian has lived for the past 4 1/2 months, refused to give up the boy and said he would not cooperate with agents who might try to take him away. "We will not turn this child over, not in Opa-locka, not in any `locka,'" he said.
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