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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 28, 2001
A week after a high-profile study cast a negative light on child care, researchers - including the study's lead statistician - are sharply questioning whether their controversial work has been misrepresented. As publicly reported last week, the study showed that the more time preschoolers spend in child care, the more likely their teachers were to report behavior problems such as aggression and defiance in kindergarten. But several academics involved in the study feel that its conclusion was overstated and that other important findings never reached the public.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Megan Mocik never envisioned herself as a stay-at-home mother. After having twins four years ago, the former marketing manager for New York-based International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. was determined to press on with a career, even one that came with lengthy commutes and long workdays. But getting back into the workforce proved difficult and came with unappealing trade-offs. The Bel Air woman chose a path taken by more mothers today, choosing to stay home with the kids - reversing a decades-long trend.
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NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
Kathy Lating-Wise of Havre de Grace and Elizabeth "Libby" Lawson-Lilley of Cub Hill recently released their first book, Letters of Advice for Child Care Providers - a compilation of early elementary child-care questions and advice. The book is a series of queries sent from day-care provider Lating-Wise to pediatric nurse practitioner Lawson-Lilley, who answers questions in a "Dear Abby"-type manner. Chapters such as health, development, socialization and eating habits categorize 100 child-care problem scenarios, conveyed with humor by Lating-Wise.
NEWS
April 19, 2014
I normally agree with columnist Dan Rodricks ' assertions and conclusions, but I was disappointed with his comments regarding Attorney General Doug Gansler's gubernatorial campaign ( "10 weeks out, 2 questions for Maryland Democrats," April 12). Mr. Rodricks chose to focus on the beach-house party in Delaware last summer that Mr. Gansler briefly visited. However, either he doesn't know the facts about that incident or he simply considers them irrelevant. The Instagram photo does show Mr. Gansler amid a group of partying teenagers, including his son. The photo also shows adult chaperons keeping an eye on the revelers - but Mr. Rodricks doesn't bother to point that out. He also neglects to note that the party house was rented for graduation week festivities by five sets of student parents who slept in the house all week - with at least two of them chaperoning at all times.
TRAVEL
By New York Times News Service | September 29, 2002
Many parents who enjoy traveling pursue one of three strategies when they hit the road: leave the kids with a willing relative, take a nanny along or plan a vacation at a child-friendly resort. But sometimes none of these is an option, so to get at least one dinner out by themselves, Mom and Dad need to find a baby sitter in an unfamiliar locale. For those who find themselves in this situation, the ease of finding child care depends on a number of variables -- as does the range of the services available.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
Kudos to The Sun for shedding light on the shortage of high-quality, affordable child care ("Day care shortage frustrates parents in Baltimore," July 14). It's a challenging situation, and parents can take constructive steps to improve the status quo. They can join those of us who are advocating greater public investment in early care and education. Maryland Family Network maintains an active lobbying presence on the State and federal levels. We work for universal access to publicly funded pre-K, more funding for training and technical assistance to help improve the quality of child care, adequate funding for the Child Care Subsidy Program, and expansion of the state's community hubs that address child care needs in disadvantaged neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Margaret Williams | May 24, 2010
This month, parents across the nation were greeted by a flurry of media coverage on a topic of perennial debate: the long-term effects of sending children to child care. During the past 20 years, parents have been buffeted by contradictory information about the effect of child care on aggressive behavior, attention span and cognitive ability. The new data from the Early Child Care Research Network did little to reduce uncertainty. On one hand, the new findings report that teens who were in high-quality child care as young children scored slightly higher on academic and cognitive assessments and were slightly less likely to "act out" than peers who were in lower-quality child care as young children.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Marguerite Austin-Gorham, a retired child care provider and housekeeper, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Nov. 27 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The East Baltimore resident was 88. Born Marguerite Clark in Baltimore and raised on Edythe Street, she was a 1941 graduate of Dunbar High School. She became a housekeeper and worked for many years at the Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church Rectory at Saratoga and Cathedral streets. She assisted in child care for the Rev. Halsey Moon Cook and for the Rev. William C. McKeachie, who were rectors of the downtown church.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 28, 2013
The parents who sent their babies off to full-day kindergarten or first grade this week must feel like they just got a big raise. New information about the high costs of quality child care - it can cost as much as a year in college - indicates that middle- and upper-middle-class families are having the same difficulties finding the money to pay for it as the working poor. Alissa Quart, in a New York Times essay that drew a great deal of attention, wrote that child-care costs can easily consume all of a middle-class couple's disposable income, while child care can cost low-income families more than food or housing.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
A state audit found that the Maryland State Department of Education did not conduct routine but critical inspections of child care facilities and failed to follow up on red flags raised by background checks of staff working for the programs. The audit, released Tuesday by the state's Office of Legislative Audits, found that the department did not perform 31 mandated inspections of child care facilities in the region, primarily in Baltimore and in Prince George's County. The inspections "ensure that child care facilities protect the general health and safety of children under their care," such as supervision and cleanliness, according to the audit.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Reporter Meredith Cohn 's recent article about the World Health Organization's new sugar recommendations highlighted the concerns of medical and public health experts over the epidemic of childhood obesity ( "Officials urge consumers to cut back on sugar," March 21). Sugar in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages is in fact the leading contributor to the obesity epidemic. According to the Institute of Medicine's 2012 report, a full 20 percent of the nation's weight increase since 1977 can be directly attributed to sugary drinks like soda, sports drinks, energy drinks and sweetened juices and teas.
NEWS
By Howard Leathers | February 4, 2014
It may be that some minimum wage earners would be harmed by an increase in the minimum wage because they would lose their jobs. But what about those who keep their jobs? A more surprising result is this: Some minimum wage earners who keep their jobs would be harmed by an increase in the minimum wage because the dollar value of the government benefits they would lose is higher than their increase in wages. This fact is illustrated by the Urban Institute's Net Income Calculator, which shows for various family configurations and income levels the "net income" - earnings after child care costs plus or minus the dollar value of taxes and subsidies - for the household.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
Sunday, Jan. 26 Child care fair Howard County's Department of Citizen Services Preschool/Child Care Information Fair, "Children On Board," will be held from 1 p.m to 4 p.m. at Ten Oaks Ballroom, 5000 Signal Bell Lane in Clarksville. Admission is free, but attendees are asked to bring a nonperishable food item to donate to the Howard County Food Bank. Fair will provide parents, guardians, grandparents and child care personnel with information on child care, preschool and summer programs, as well as the opportunity to talk with teachers and program directors. Representatives from community service organizations that offer programs and services to the county's youngsters will also attend.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | November 13, 2013
The Washington Post called Chris Christie's huge gubernatorial victory a "clear signal in favor of pragmatic, as opposed to ideological, governance. " But the mainstream media used a different adjective to describe Bill de Blasio, Election Day's other landslide victor. The New York Times, for example, wrote of "the rise of the left-leaning Mr. de Blasio. " Again and again, Christie is being described as the pragmatist; De Blasio, as the lefty. But in light of America's surging inequality, the labels should be reversed.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
The FBI is investigating allegations of child sexual abuse by a former employee of the Fort Meade Youth Center, a spokeswoman for the Army base said Friday. Authorities did not identify the man. Base spokeswoman Mary Doyle said the suspect left his job at the youth center in 2012. She said the abuse allegedly occurred at the center while he worked there. The allegations were reported to law enforcement, Doyle said, and the suspect has been banned from the base in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Del. Heather Mizeur rolled out a plan Thursday that would expand pre-kindergarten to 3-year-olds and overhaul the state's income eligibility requirements for child care subsidies. "I'm proud of our schools for being rated first in the nation," the Montgomery County delegate said to a group gathered at Downtown Baltimore Child Care Inc. "But the title loses some of its distinction when we take a look at diversity and income achievement gaps. Closing the gaps will be a major priority of my administration, and the only way to truly level the playing field is to start with early childhood education.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | December 10, 2010
Baltimore firefighters were investigating the cause of a carbon monoxide leak Friday that prompted the evacuation of 48 people — 36 children and 12 adults — at the Pleasant View Gardens Child Care Center. Fire union officials initially described it as a "mass casualty carbon monoxide incident" and said the victims were being hospitalized, but reports from the scene indicated that those affected were being evaluated outside the building in the 1100 block of E. Fayette St. and no one appeared to be showing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning.
NEWS
March 25, 2005
MARYLAND'S network of child care resource centers is in danger of collapse, but legislators can keep this critical program going by reversing the most recent cuts in its funding. The regional resource centers connect parents to quality child care providers, train providers and help them open and expand their businesses. Each center has local expertise, such as working knowledge of city bus routes and the strengths of each caregiver, to help parents make smart decisions. When the network's budget was slashed from $5.8 million in fiscal year 2003 to $3.8 million in 2004, it closed one center and dropped most of its work helping providers obtain licenses and open much-needed slots for kids.
NEWS
October 11, 2013
For longtime advocates of early childhood education, it is deeply gratifying to see proposals for expanding public pre-k discussed in astute detail by candidates for governor. However, as The Sun's editorial ("The most important investment," Oct. 9) points out, expanding pre-k comes with challenges - including the need for "significant capital investments" in new classrooms and bus fleets, potentially negative impacts on private child care programs already providing "excellent instruction," and most notably, "how to pay for it. " Each of these challenges can be addressed, in part, by what's known in the field as "diverse delivery" - a key component of the pre-k approach championed by many state and national experts.
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