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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 1, 2012
Fractures, head trauma, burns and other serious injuries among child abuse victims is on the rise, despite what data from child protective service agencies show, according to new research by Yale School of Medicine. Serious injuries from child abuse increased nearly 5 percent in the last 12 years, the study found. Child protective service agencies show a 55 percent drop in physical abuses cases from 1997 to 2009. Yale researchers said it raises questions on the accuracy in the way abuse cases are reported to child protective service agencies.
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NEWS
By Justin George and Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
A Baltimore woman received a 40-year prison sentence Monday in the death of her 1-year-old grandson and abuse of her granddaughter after a judge said she rubbed methadone onto the children's gums before she put them to bed and headed off to a party. Towanda Reaves, 51, took responsibility for the boy's death but said she never meant to kill him. "This is not the intentional killing of her grandson, but those who think this was some form of tragic accident misunderstand the case, and misunderstand the jury's analysis of it," said Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy Doory.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 23, 2014
An Aberdeen woman was found guilty Thursday of child abuse and neglect. A Harford County Circuit Court jury in Bel Air found Kayla Marie Barker, 25, guilty of first-degree child abuse and neglect of a minor after two hours of deliberation, according to Harford State's Attorney Joseph Cassilly. Cassilly said evidence presented over the course of three days of testimony showed Barker had repeatedly beaten her 8-month old daughter in the head on April 17, 2012, causing multiple skull fractures because the child would not stop crying.
NEWS
By Darian G. Burns | September 29, 2014
Ray Rice is not the only NFL player currently dealing with a suspension. Unless you have been living under a rock, you have heard by now that Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was indicted for child abuse after taking a switch to his 4-year-old child's back, buttocks and legs. In response to the indictment Mr. Peterson, like Mr. Rice, was suspended, then reinstated and then suspended again from playing. Mr. Peterson denies that what he did was abuse. He defends himself, says he was simply disciplining a child and that, yes, he did get carried away in that discipline.
NEWS
March 6, 2010
As Maryland's leading child-abuse prevention organization, we at The Family Tree know that Senate Bill 689 will help protect Maryland's children from maltreatment. By providing clear guidance about how a parent may discipline his or her child, the bill both teaches parents appropriate behavior and protects children from dangerous abuse. The Family Tree wholeheartedly endorses Senate Bill 689 and applauds its co-sponsors, Sens. Jamie Raskin and Richard Madaleno. Child abuse takes a tremendous toll in the United States.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
FREDERICK, Md. (AP) — The mother of a 2-month-old girl who was fatally beaten at her home in Brunswick has pleaded guilty to second-degree child abuse for failing to protect her daughter from the girl's father. Twenty-one-year-old Jessica Peavy entered the plea Tuesday in Frederick. Frederick County State's Attorney Charlie Smith says the state will seek a one-year jail term, with 14 years suspended, at Peavy's sentencing Oct. 27. He says prosecutors also will ask for supervised probation with drug treatment.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
A Severn father was found guilty of child neglect on Wednesday, but was acquitted of the most serious charge facing him - child abuse - in a case that stemmed from his 5-year-old son losing consciousness after drinking methadone. In a bench trial, Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Paul A. Hackner found Paul K. Brooks Sr., 28, guilty of seven charges, including drug possession, stemming from the September 2012 incident. Hackner said Brooks should have acted faster to get the child medical help when he began to get sick - but he noted that Brooks ultimately made the 911 call, according to a recording of the verdict.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 9, 2012
When children are abused, the human costs are high, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : Children who were physically, sexually or psychologically abused are more likely to have poorer health, social and emotional difficulties and lower economic productivity. But the abuse also substantially impacts the nation's health care, education, criminal justice and welfare systems - the costs from abuse and neglect are approximately $124 million just from one year's worth of cases over the abused lifetimes, the CDC says in a new report.
NEWS
November 11, 2011
The scandal currently rocking Penn State and its beloved football coach Joe Paterno sheds important light on how we respond to child abuse. It's a reminder that the impact of remaining silent in the face of sexual abuse can be devastating. We mourn the humiliation of the university and the coach, but let's give equal attention to the suffering of the victims. Some of the abuse was likely preventable had adults in the know, at the time, put their foot down. Children depend on adults to protect them.
NEWS
November 10, 2011
Today we have witnessed a complete and total failure of the American higher education system ("Paterno fired," Nov. 10).  I am embarrassed that the educational system that I am a part of was responsible for affecting the lives of children in a negative way, not the positive ways that the good people in my field strive to do on a daily basis. This appalling scandal is not about touchdowns, a coaching legend's fall from grace, or money, this about breaching the trust that every parent that sends their child to college expects from us as educators.  Every person in higher education has a moral responsibility and expectation to protect the young men and women we interact with on a daily basis.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 21, 2014
My mother was a child abuser. I was, too. In fact, growing up, pretty much every parent I knew abused their kids. Or so many of Adrian Peterson's critics would have you believe. Mr. Peterson, a star of the Minnesota Vikings, was arrested recently for child abuse after hitting his 4-year-old son with a switch. A "switch," for those who don't know, is a long twig. I should know, having been on the receiving end of quite a few. When no switch was available, mom was also known to employ a section of the orange plastic track from my Hot Wheels.
NEWS
September 19, 2014
Recent events in the news have called attention to domestic violence, particularly in association with the NFL. Ray Rice is at the forefront, but Adrian Peterson has also been charged with child abuse. In the past other star athletes have been charged with sexual abuse or even murder. As a nation we are outraged by the NFL's handling of all these events past and present. Sitting in front of our TVs waiting to see how the NFL and its executives will be punished enthralls us. But how many of us have watched what is unfolding on TV and gotten up to do something to help others who are experiencing violence in their lives, domestic or otherwise?
NEWS
September 17, 2014
I wish to address the recent events in which young children are being hurt by family violence, whether directly as victims or indirectly as witnesses. I believe that Ray and Janay Rice love their child and want what is best for her. We don't know for sure whether Ray Rice's assault of Janay was the first incident or not so we don't know whether Rayven witnessed his violence but certainly there is that possibility. I believe that Adrian Peterson loves his child and wants what is best for him. We can choose to call what Mr. Peterson did to his son "discipline," but, according to the report, he hit him with a switch, leaving bruises and cuts ( "NFL now must tackle child abuse," Sept.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
As a retired speech professor who has taught many elements of argument for a very long time, maybe I can help you. I read your recent piece associating the NFL with a responsibility for disciplining players for activities that I don't believe have anything directly to do with what they actually get paid for, which is playing football ( "NFL now must tackle child abuse," Sept. 15). Unless there is something that I obviously wouldn't know about in the player's contract requiring such intervention - not given in your editorial - we have a major link missing in your advocacy.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
The National Football League received more domestic violence-related bad news last week with the arrest of Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, who was charged over the weekend in Texas with reckless or negligent injury to a child. The allegation is that he used a tree branch or "switch" to spank his 4-year-old son, who suffered cuts and bruises to his back, buttocks, ankles and legs. Given that this was Texas, a state not normally given to condemning spanking of children as a disciplinary tool, one presumes that the injuries the preschooler suffered — because he allegedly failed to share his video game with a sibling — were pretty harsh.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Three men who were sexually abused by a church youth-ministry leader years ago experienced a measure of justice Wednesday as they confronted their abuser in court, read emotion-charged statements about how his crimes have damaged their lives, and heard a judge sentence him to 16 years in prison. Jediah Tanguay, 33; Benjamin Tanguay, 31; and Roger Robbins, 30, were minors in the 1990s when Raymond Fernandez, then a longtime youth leader at Greater Grace World Outreach Church in East Baltimore, has admitted he molested them.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
Maryland is one of three states that requires workers in certain occupations to report child abuse but whose law doesn't include criminal sanctions against those who fail to do so, according to a state legislative analysis. That distinction met with renewed criticism last week after a Baltimore Sun investigation by Tricia Bishop revealed court records claiming that a Catholic school principal and other Catholic officials were aware of a teacher's sexual abuse of students, but didn't report it until the teacher was under investigation - years after the crimes took place in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
A man who has been tried three times in the death of a 3-year-old girl has been denied a chance at a fourth trial with a ruling by the state's highest court affirming his latest conviction for involuntary manslaughter and child abuse. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled unanimously that 31-year-old Erik Stoddard's conviction and 40-year prison sentence will stand in the 2002 fatal beating of Calen Faith Dirubbo in her Northeast Baltimore home. Police said the suspect was angry because he had been unable to toilet train the girl.
NEWS
By L. Anthony Loman | July 25, 2014
Over the past year Maryland's Department of Human Resources has begun implementing a different approach to families reported for child abuse and neglect called "Alternative Response" (AR). Also referred to as "Differential Response," similar reforms to Child Protection Services (CPS) have been implemented in other states during the past 20 years. The common theme of these reforms is a recognition that the situations of families differ substantially and that responses to child maltreatment reports should vary accordingly.
NEWS
By Daniel Heimpel | July 17, 2014
Earlier this month, The Baltimore Sun published an important story describing the expansion of Alternative Response (AR) across Maryland (" A new tactic to halt child abuse in Maryland ," July 5). The new system assigns child abuse and neglect cases to one of two tiered tracks based upon whether they are deemed low or high risk. High risk cases are formally investigated, low risk ones are not. While Maryland's Department of Human Resources, certain advocates, and a clot of consultants and evaluators celebrate the move to what they see as an evolution in the state's response to child abuse, they are missing - or worse, disregarding - simple documented truths that should shake any reasonable person's confidence.
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