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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 11, 1994
If you didn't know better, you might think Paddy Moloney was some kind of rock star.Ask him what he and his band, the Chieftains, have been up to lately, and it's like tumbling into some real-life version of Rolling Stone's "Random Notes" column. In just two weeks, Moloney and his mates have recorded with Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones, concertized with Roger Daltrey and Sinead O'Connor, and were backstage at the Grammys (where they won the Best Traditional Folk Album award) posing for pictures with Bono.
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NEWS
March 19, 2006
DisneyWar By James B. Stewart Simon & Schuster / 608 pages / $16 Stewart, a dogged reporter, presents a deep and unflattering look inside Mickey Mouse's kingdom. Last year, Jay Hancock wrote, "DisneyWar shatters any remaining suspicions that corporate chieftains know what the heck they're doing or care about anything but the person identified on their business cards."
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By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
It has taken a little time -- 28 years and 22 albums -- but The Chieftains are finally receiving the same kind of reception around the world that they've enjoyed in their Irish home for most of their existence.Of course it helps to have many of their homeland's more popular performers like U2, Midge Ure, Bob Geldof, Sinead O'Connor and Van Morrison within their fan base."We've been very fortunate to have made good friends along the way," said Paddy Moloney, the chief Chieftain. "Of course, when you stick around for as long as we have you hope somebody has been listening."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 5, 2004
POL-E-ALAM, Afghanistan - They are an ancient group of wanderers, mostly landless, illiterate and loyal to a way of life thousands of years old. But when it comes to their nation's first democratic presidential elections, Afghanistan's Kuchi nomads are right in the thick of things. Experts from Western nations are doing everything they can to ensure that Afghans vote their conscience in the presidential elections Saturday. Yet, as the story of the Kuchi nomads shows, Afghan-style democracy seems to be shaping up as the kind of rough-and-tumble ward politics in which votes and favors are traded, political bosses call the shots and ethnic loyalties rule.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 12, 1997
Paddy Moloney attracts folk musicians the way rock stars attract groupies.No sooner does word get out that he and the Chieftains are looking for people to play with than a mob scene ensues. Take, for instance, the sessions that went into "Santiago de Cuba" and "Galleguita/Tutankhamen," two selections from the Chieftains' recent Grammy-winning album, "Santiago.""The musicians are just out of this world," says Moloney, over the phone from a New York hotel. "Starved for exposure and just dying to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 30, 1990
Ask Paddy Moloney what he and the Chieftains have been up to lately, and you'll quickly learn that there's no short answer to the question. It isn't that the Dublin-born Moloney is unduly blessed with the Irish gift of gab; it just takes awhile to get through everything.This band has always had a heavy schedule. Never mind the albums -- there are 22 of Irish traditional music so far, with two more ready for 1991 release. There's also the Chieftains' career in the cinema, having provided the score to such films as "Barry Lyndon," "The Grey Fox," "Tristan and Isolde" and the upcoming "Treasure Island."
NEWS
March 19, 2006
DisneyWar By James B. Stewart Simon & Schuster / 608 pages / $16 Stewart, a dogged reporter, presents a deep and unflattering look inside Mickey Mouse's kingdom. Last year, Jay Hancock wrote, "DisneyWar shatters any remaining suspicions that corporate chieftains know what the heck they're doing or care about anything but the person identified on their business cards."
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER-TRIBUNE | March 12, 2002
When he started his band four decades ago, Paddy Moloney's ambitions were sincere but relatively modest. "All we wanted to do was spread the gospel of this great folk art of ours," said Moloney, leader of the Chieftains. "We'd seen what the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem were able to do with the great Irish ballads - you know, play Carnegie Hall. We thought ... we'd like to see traditional Irish music get the same recognition." Moloney, an accomplished piper, doggedly turned that notion into legend and gold: The Chieftains turn 40 this year and - mission accomplished - they have played virtually every famous venue in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | February 26, 2004
Chieftains / Meyerhoff Traditional Irish band the Chieftains bring their music to the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., tonight at 7:30. Tickets are $34-$52. For more information, visit www .baltimoresymphony.org. Holmes Brothers / Rams Head Tavern The Holmes Brothers will lay down the blues at Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St. in Annapolis, tomorrow night at 8:30. Tickets are $17.50. For more information, visit www.ramsheadtavern.com. James Brown / 9:30 Club He's gonna get up offa dat thang, dance and make you feel betta.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine | March 17, 2000
Eight essential Irish albums: The Chieftains -- "The Chieftains Collection" (Claddagh/Atlantic 83224). The best of the landmark band's early years. Derek Bell -- "Carolan's Receipt" (Claddagh/Atlantic 83282). A delicate and lyrical tribute to the great Irish harp composer Turlough O'Carolan, performed by Bell and other Chieftains. Clannad -- "Fuaim" (Celtic Heartbeat 82481). Clannad started out traditional folk and evolved into pop. In this album, it draws on jazz and pop but staysclose to its Irish roots.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | March 17, 2004
CHARLIE Cawley was schooled by Benedictine monks imbued with humility, but he did not absorb the trait. Why would he? His achievements might have turned St. Benedict himself into a blowhard, and Cawley was no St. Benedict. From scratch, Cawley built a financial company that earned $2.3 billion last year and is worth $34 billion on the stock market. He invented the idea of decorating credit cards with logos of universities and associations, thus getting the organizations to do much of the hard work of peddling the plastic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | February 26, 2004
Chieftains / Meyerhoff Traditional Irish band the Chieftains bring their music to the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., tonight at 7:30. Tickets are $34-$52. For more information, visit www .baltimoresymphony.org. Holmes Brothers / Rams Head Tavern The Holmes Brothers will lay down the blues at Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St. in Annapolis, tomorrow night at 8:30. Tickets are $17.50. For more information, visit www.ramsheadtavern.com. James Brown / 9:30 Club He's gonna get up offa dat thang, dance and make you feel betta.
BUSINESS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - Corporate executives and board members are forever telling Maryland's Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes how difficult he's made their lives. "They tell me, `This is really making us work extra-hard,'" says Sarbanes, a Democrat and the chief author of last year's sweeping corporate reform legislation. But the complaints don't bother him. "They should be working hard," he says of the corporate chieftains, directors and accountants whose jobs were forever changed by the bill, which marks its first anniversary of enactment tomorrow.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | September 15, 2002
THERE IS a lot of information investors wish they could get from mutual fund companies. The top executive's certification of the fund's financial statements is not part of it. Don't get me wrong. If the Securities and Exchange Commission intends to have every corporate top dog in America vouch for the truth in the numbers, it won't get any complaints from me. It will just have a hard time proving that such a document is actually fruitful and worthwhile for investors. "I don't think a certification would have any substantive meaning for the shareholders of a fund," says Burton J. Greenwald of B.J. Greenwald & Associates, a Philadelphia-based industry consulting firm.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER-TRIBUNE | March 12, 2002
When he started his band four decades ago, Paddy Moloney's ambitions were sincere but relatively modest. "All we wanted to do was spread the gospel of this great folk art of ours," said Moloney, leader of the Chieftains. "We'd seen what the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem were able to do with the great Irish ballads - you know, play Carnegie Hall. We thought ... we'd like to see traditional Irish music get the same recognition." Moloney, an accomplished piper, doggedly turned that notion into legend and gold: The Chieftains turn 40 this year and - mission accomplished - they have played virtually every famous venue in the world.
NEWS
By Neal Peirce | May 16, 2001
WASHINGTON -- A new organization, CEOs for Cities, was announced with fanfare at the National Press Club this month. Isn't the very title an oxymoron? Didn't CEOs fleeing urban woes, seeking low costs on suburban green fields, aggravate the decline of American cities from the 1950s onward? Answer: Yes. But that was in another century. Today, CEOs for Cities declares in its founding manifest, "The Era of Urban Decline is over. America's cities are coming back." They have evidence and new arguments on their side.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | May 31, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Ron Howard had wanted to make a film with Tom Cruise for several years. And he had seen the Australian thriller "Dead Calm" and was impressed with its female star, Nicole Kidman.He told producer Brian Grazer he would like them to star in his epic of Irish immigrants, "Far and Away." But he wondered if they would be agreeable to working together so soon after "Days of Thunder.""I had to sit Ron down and explain to him very carefully that they most likely would be very agreeable because they were engaged to be married," Mr. Grazer says.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | March 17, 2004
CHARLIE Cawley was schooled by Benedictine monks imbued with humility, but he did not absorb the trait. Why would he? His achievements might have turned St. Benedict himself into a blowhard, and Cawley was no St. Benedict. From scratch, Cawley built a financial company that earned $2.3 billion last year and is worth $34 billion on the stock market. He invented the idea of decorating credit cards with logos of universities and associations, thus getting the organizations to do much of the hard work of peddling the plastic.
NEWS
April 2, 2000
Name: Michael Swartz Job description: President for about 2 1/2 years, Columbia Youth Baseball Association. Started in CYBA as a coach about eight years ago. Organization, growing again after sagging a couple of years ago, has about 1,100 players, starting with tee-ball, going through travel teams, including roughly 200 girls playing softball. Budget is about $100,000 annually. CYBA draws mainly from Columbia and communities immediately surrounding it. Age: 38 Residence: Moved three years ago to Ellicott City after living in Columbia's Owen Brown village for about eight years.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine | March 17, 2000
Eight essential Irish albums: The Chieftains -- "The Chieftains Collection" (Claddagh/Atlantic 83224). The best of the landmark band's early years. Derek Bell -- "Carolan's Receipt" (Claddagh/Atlantic 83282). A delicate and lyrical tribute to the great Irish harp composer Turlough O'Carolan, performed by Bell and other Chieftains. Clannad -- "Fuaim" (Celtic Heartbeat 82481). Clannad started out traditional folk and evolved into pop. In this album, it draws on jazz and pop but staysclose to its Irish roots.
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