Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChiefs Of Police
IN THE NEWS

Chiefs Of Police

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 26, 1999
The Maryland Chiefs of Police have named Howard County police Officer Gabriel Arias as the state's police officer of the year for 1998, eight months after he was recognized as the county's officer of the year. Arias has been on the force since April 1993.Officials looked at a number of criteria but focused on community policing, said county Police Chief Wayne Livesay.Arias, who usually patrols west Columbia, was recognized locally for his work in community policing initiatives in Harper's Choice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
The Baltimore County Police Department has been recognized by an international police organization for its use of a statewide program designed to keep watch on the most violent offenders. The International Association of Chiefs of Police awarded the Webber Seavey Award to Chief James W. Johnson for using the Violence Prevention Initiative, a four-year-old program that fosters greater cooperation between police officers and state parole and probation agents. Police have used the program to jail people for probation violations who are suspects in criminal investigations, to seize weapons and to develop information used to make arrests.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1999
It was a typical day for Howard County Pfc. Gabriel Arias. He was patrolling western Columbia, stopping by the Foreign-Born Information and Referral Network's office and, at District Court, accepting congratulations from yet another acquaintance."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | May 6, 2008
In trying to dupe an unsuspecting citizen with a phony check scheme, scammers probably could've picked a better mark. Last Thursday, Anne Arundel County police Chief James P. Teare Sr. received, via FedEx, an unexpected check for $4,200 at his office at county police headquarters. He turned it over to investigators, who later determined it was fraudulent. They believe the check was sent as part of a scam in which victims are sent a large sum of money - often described as prize winnings - with instructions to deposit the check and send a portion of the proceeds to an address, typically out of the country.
NEWS
By Staff Report | October 5, 1993
Police chiefs from several states met yesterday in Anne Arundel County to discuss an effort to stem the tide of illegal firearms by setting up a regional computer system to track weapon sales across state borders.Though no firm agreement came out of the meeting in a conference room at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, police officials were confident that one could be reached among the states involved, which stretch from Vermont to West Virginia.
NEWS
April 7, 2004
The Hampstead Police Department is participating in the 2004 Maryland Chief's Challenge, being held through June 6. The annual event is an initiative to educate the public about the importance of using seat belts and child safety seats. The challenge is co-sponsored by the Maryland Chiefs of Police Association, Maryland Committee for Safety Belt Use and Maryland Highway Safety Office. The Hampstead police will be conducting belt-use surveys and establishing enforcement zones in and around town during the two-month period.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 26, 1999
The Maryland Chiefs of Police has named Howard County police Officer Gabriel Arias as the state's police officer of the year for 1998, eight months after he was recognized as the county's officer of the year. Arias has been on the force since April 1993.Officials looked at a number of criteria, but focused on community policing, said county Police Chief Wayne Livesay.Arias -- who usually patrols west Columbia -- was recognized locally for his work in community policing initiatives in Harper's Choice.
NEWS
August 2, 2003
Julius "Dick" LeBrell, retired chief of police for Westinghouse's Linthicum operation, died Monday of cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 85. Born in Norfolk, Va., he moved to Baltimore with his parents and was a 1936 graduate of City College. He served in the Navy during World War II and was stationed in Europe. He joined Westinghouse Defense Electronics and moved through its ranks from a uniformed patrolman until he retired as its police chief about 15 years ago. In all, he spent 46 years with the defense contractor at its Linthicum location.
NEWS
By These obituaries were provided by area funeral homes. If informationhasn't been published about someone in your family who has passed away, please call Marc LeGoff at 761-1732 or 332-6211 or (800) 829-8000, Ext. 6211. You may also fax your information to us at 332-6677 | September 1, 1991
Services for Howard Tull of Long Neck, Del., formerly of Annapolis, took place 1 p.m. Aug. 31 at the Hardesty Funeral Home in Annapolis.Mr. Tull, 65, died Aug. 29 of a heart attack at Beebe Hospital in Lewes, Del.He was originally from Fredericksburg, Va., and had worked in thecarpet business and as a carpet estimator for 40 years.Survivorsinclude his wife; Rheba W. Tull at home; three sons, Christopher W. Tull of Silver Spring, Guy M. Tull of Arlington, Va., and Douglas V. Tull of Greenbelt; a daughter, Dana April Hood of Annapolis; a brother, Stanley Tull of Leesburg, Va.; two sisters, Jeanne Medlin and Joyce Long, both of Annapolis, and six grandchildren.
NEWS
June 2, 1991
Ten motorists were arrested and face charges for drunken driving following a three-hour sobriety checkpoint May 25 on Pulaski Highway in Joppa, the county Sheriff's Department said.The average blood-alcohol content of those arrested was .13, the department said. Motorists found with a blood-alcohol content of between .07 and .10 can be charged with driving under the influence. Motorists with a blood-alcohol content of more than .10 can be charged with driving while intoxicated.Sheriff's deputies and troopers from the state police barracks atBenson stopped 701 vehicles at the checkpoint, police said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
As state officials target Maryland's capital as a guinea pig for new crime-fighting strategies, Annapolis Police Chief Joseph Johnson announced yesterday that he will be stepping down after nearly 14 years at the helm of the department. Johnson, 65, was the city's first black police chief when he was appointed in 1994, after a career spanning more than two decades with the Baltimore City police. In his first few months alone, he was credited with easing racial tensions and boosting morale in a department where the police union had voted no confidence in the previous chief.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | June 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- For five years, the National Rifle Association and its allies have successfully lobbied Congress to limit the ability of local police to access federal gun trace data. Now, by moving to remove those limits and increase the ability of local officers to track so-called crime guns, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski is venturing into what is rapidly emerging as the latest battlefield in the war over gun rights. A provision first approved in 2003, when Republicans controlled Congress, sets tight controls on how the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives may share its gun data with local police departments.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
Howard County's longest-serving police chief, Wayne Livesay, will retire May 31 after more than eight years in command to devote himself full time to running for County Council, he said yesterday -- the same day he received a legal opinion saying he would have to resign to avoid violating federal law. "I was up all night last night, because I knew today was coming. It's been a rough couple days [emotionally]. This has been my life," he said. Livesay, 54, who joined the Howard force more than 34 years ago, said he had decided on his last day months ago but announced it shortly after receiving word from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel that he must resign by June 2 or be in violation of the Hatch Act, which bars political activity by federal employees.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Baltimore Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm promoted his crime-fighting plan to the City Council last night, but he said it will face a "decisive" test in the next few months -- a period when crime regularly increases with the temperatures. After the hearing, Deputy Commissioner Marcus Brown said that in addition to the three high-crime areas that officers have been swarming since January, they have begun focusing on nine more areas. The department will spend $2 million in overtime to fill those areas through July with additional officers.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2005
Former Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark lost his lawsuit against Mayor Martin O'Malley yesterday, derailing the fired commander's attempt to collect $120 million and return to his job. City Circuit Judge Albert J. Matricciani Jr. issued a declaratory judgment in favor of the city, potentially ending the messy legal battle between the one-time crime-fighting allies. Clark could appeal the ruling but has not decided on a course of action, his attorney said yesterday. O'Malley dismissed Clark on Nov. 10, saying that allegations of domestic abuse, although unsubstantiated, had eroded the commissioner's ability to lead.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
Col. Thomas Spence Smith, the longest-serving Maryland State Police superintendent in history, died in his sleep Wednesday after a brief illness. He was 87. Colonel Smith, who passed away at Genesis Spa Creek Center in Annapolis, also was the first career state police officer to attain the rank of superintendent. He joined the force in 1940, five years after the police agency was formed. In 1970, he was appointed superintendent by Gov. Marvin Mandel and served for 12 years until his retirement.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
Col. Thomas Spence Smith, the longest-serving Maryland State Police superintendent in history, died in his sleep Wednesday after a brief illness. He was 87. Colonel Smith, who passed away at Genesis Spa Creek Center in Annapolis, also was the first career state police officer to attain the rank of superintendent. He joined the force in 1940, five years after the police agency was formed. In 1970, he was appointed superintendent by Gov. Marvin Mandel and served for 12 years until his retirement.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | October 26, 1994
William H. Wilkinson, retired chief of the Easton Police Department, died Sunday of cancer at home in the Eastern Shore community. He was 81.Known as "Chief," he retired in 1976 after a 38-year career during which he modernized the department. He eliminated bicycles in the late 1940s when he introduced patrol cars with two-way radios. He got rid of the old-fashioned call boxes and equipped officers with walkie-talkies.Chief Wilkinson also hired the department's first two black officers in 1958.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2004
Elmer F. Hagner Jr., a former Anne Arundel County police chief who served in the General Assembly for 16 years, died Wednesday after falling last month at his Annapolis home. The 85-year-old Annapolis resident died at Anne Arundel Medical Center. A decorated World War II veteran, he was the county's police chief from 1964 to 1969, after which he entered politics as a Democrat and was elected to four terms in the Maryland House of Delegates. "As a police officer he was very much a gentle man, respected and liked.
NEWS
April 7, 2004
The Hampstead Police Department is participating in the 2004 Maryland Chief's Challenge, being held through June 6. The annual event is an initiative to educate the public about the importance of using seat belts and child safety seats. The challenge is co-sponsored by the Maryland Chiefs of Police Association, Maryland Committee for Safety Belt Use and Maryland Highway Safety Office. The Hampstead police will be conducting belt-use surveys and establishing enforcement zones in and around town during the two-month period.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.