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By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | September 21, 1993
JERUSALEM -- In a century-old stone castle across from the walls of the Old City, a bedroom awaits the visit of the pope, now increasingly likely if peace really banks the fires of the Israeli-Palestinian feud.Israel's chief rabbi will meet Pope John Paul II in Rome today. This first-ever meeting comes amid reports the Vatican soon will establish formal ties with the 48-year-old modern Jewish state, and the pontiff then will visit the Holy Land.Room 158 of the Notre Dame Pontifical Institute, an old pilgrims' castle crowned by a huge Virgin Mary and two medieval-style turrets, has been reserved as the "Pope's Quarters" if he visits.
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NEWS
March 7, 2014
Letter writer Andrij Chornodolsky demands that the West confront Russia over the crisis in Crimea ( "Stand up to Putin," March 4). But while long on eloquent phraseology, he's short on facts - the same facts that mainstream media coverage of the Ukrainian situation has consistently ignored. First, the insurgents are not fighting for "democracy and justice," as Mr. Chornodolsky claims. Their demonstrations and rallies, up to and including the coup of Feb. 22, have been led by out-and-out, swastika-wearing Nazis, holdovers from the infamous Stefan Bandera apparatus that openly allied with Hitler during his 1941 invasion of the Soviet Union and murdered nearly 100,000 Poles and Jews in Ukraine during the occupation.
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NEWS
October 31, 1994
Shlomo Goren, a former chief rabbi of Israel and an outspoken critic of Israeli reconciliation with the Palestine Liberation Organization, died Saturday after suffering a heart attack. He was 77. Rabbi Goren, who served as Israel's chief rabbi from 1973-1983, was often at the center of controversy. A year ago, he issued a religious ruling that soldiers could refuse orders to dismantle Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank. Rabbi Goren's call for disobedience was given special weight because he served as chief military chaplain during the 1967 Middle East War, reaching the rank of brigadier general.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
Of the three traditional pillars of Judaism - learning, acts of kindness and prayer - Britain's chief rabbi judges the first two as strong among contemporary Jews. It's the third that concerns him. "The spirit is weak," Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks, who visits Baltimore's Beth Tfiloh Synagogue on Sunday, said by telephone from London. "The services - I think I could say this pretty well throughout the world in general - don't really connect with people. People very often find themselves uninspired, unengaged."
NEWS
November 2, 1999
Charles Greenleaf Sweet, 81, who presided over the trial of two of the murderers of United Mine Workers union reformer Joseph "Jock" Yablonski and his family, died Saturday of heart failure in Tampa, Fla. He served two 10-year terms as president judge in Washington County, Pa.Immanuel Jakobovits,78, Britain's former chief rabbi and a refugee from Nazi Germany who became the first Jewish religious leader to be appointed to a seat in the House of Lords, died...
NEWS
By Newsday | February 15, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Israel's election of two new chief rabbis has become a worldly slugfest this year, so incendiary in tone that the smoke -- and the mud -- are flying.Since campaigning began in earnest two weeks ago, one of the candidates for the state's top religious posts has been accused of adultery, another of bribing his way out of army service in the 1950s, a third of harboring dangerously liberal ideas. Several candidates claim rivals have bugged their offices.The race became so nasty that some members of the Israeli parliament, the Knesset, called for postponing next Sunday's election indefinitely, or at least until tempers cool.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
David Gemmell, 57, a fantasy author known for his adventure tales revolving around heroism and leadership, died in London Friday two weeks after quadruple heart bypass surgery. Born in West London in 1948, he was expelled from school for gambling in 1965 and worked as a laborer, driver's assistant and nightclub bouncer before becoming a journalist. He became a full-time writer after being fired for using his colleagues as characters, according to the Web site of his publisher, Transworld Publishers.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Staff Writer | March 10, 1992
One of Israel's two chief rabbis took a detour last night from his diplomatic mission to Washington to stand in the dining room of an Upper Park Heights home, fold his hands over the back of a chair and talk to about 150 people who crammed the living room to hear him.Rabbi Avraham Hacohen Shapira said he had kept diplomats waiting in order to come to Baltimore.He spoke in Hebrew. The English translation, provided by an interpreter from his entourage, was mixed thoroughly with common Hebrew terms.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
Of the three traditional pillars of Judaism - learning, acts of kindness and prayer - Britain's chief rabbi judges the first two as strong among contemporary Jews. It's the third that concerns him. "The spirit is weak," Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks, who visits Baltimore's Beth Tfiloh Synagogue on Sunday, said by telephone from London. "The services - I think I could say this pretty well throughout the world in general - don't really connect with people. People very often find themselves uninspired, unengaged."
NEWS
July 16, 2002
Siegfried Hansen, 90, an electrical engineer who 50 years ago pioneered the hard spacesuit now used in NASA missions, died of pneumonia June 28 in Los Angeles. The spacesuit originated with Mr. Hansen's quest to improve the vacuum tube, a key component of electronic devices such as early television sets. Mr. Hansen felt that the only way to improve the tube was to test it from the inside, so he and his colleagues designed a suit that could be worn in the airless atmosphere of a vacuum.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
David Gemmell, 57, a fantasy author known for his adventure tales revolving around heroism and leadership, died in London Friday two weeks after quadruple heart bypass surgery. Born in West London in 1948, he was expelled from school for gambling in 1965 and worked as a laborer, driver's assistant and nightclub bouncer before becoming a journalist. He became a full-time writer after being fired for using his colleagues as characters, according to the Web site of his publisher, Transworld Publishers.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | January 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - While visiting Istanbul, Turkey, the other day, I took a long walk along the Bosporus near Topkapi Palace. There is nothing like standing at this stunning intersection of Europe and Asia to think about the clash of civilizations - and how we might avoid it. Make no mistake: We are living at a remarkable hinge of history, and it's not clear how it's going to swing. What is clear is that Osama bin Laden achieved his aim: 9/11 sparked real tensions between the Judeo-Christian West and the Muslim East.
NEWS
July 16, 2002
Siegfried Hansen, 90, an electrical engineer who 50 years ago pioneered the hard spacesuit now used in NASA missions, died of pneumonia June 28 in Los Angeles. The spacesuit originated with Mr. Hansen's quest to improve the vacuum tube, a key component of electronic devices such as early television sets. Mr. Hansen felt that the only way to improve the tube was to test it from the inside, so he and his colleagues designed a suit that could be worn in the airless atmosphere of a vacuum.
NEWS
November 2, 1999
Charles Greenleaf Sweet, 81, who presided over the trial of two of the murderers of United Mine Workers union reformer Joseph "Jock" Yablonski and his family, died Saturday of heart failure in Tampa, Fla. He served two 10-year terms as president judge in Washington County, Pa.Immanuel Jakobovits,78, Britain's former chief rabbi and a refugee from Nazi Germany who became the first Jewish religious leader to be appointed to a seat in the House of Lords, died...
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | April 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It is the week of Passover, the first festival of human freedom. In many ways Jews have never had it so good, and much of their good fortune is associated with freedom. But Jews have some monumental problems -- some perennial, some self-inflicted and some linked to liberty.Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin "Bibi" Netanyahu will remain in office, not indicted for "breach of trust." But there is still an alleged crisis in the peace process. Notwithstanding, those negotiations have been generally fruitful, extending Israel's survivability as a free nation in a rough neighborhood.
NEWS
By Murray Saltzman | December 19, 1995
RABBI MITCHELL Wohlberg of Congregation Beth Tfiloh, speaking about Yitzhak Rabin's assassination, recently confessed, ''It pains me to say what I am about to say but what must be said. The fact, is, for our people the two greatest tragedies and desecration of God's name that have taken place in recent years were perpetrated by two religiously observant Orthodox Jews: Baruch Goldstein's massacre of 29 Arabs in Chevron, and Yigal Amir's assassination of Yitzhak Rabin in Tel Aviv. . . . How can this be?
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | January 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - While visiting Istanbul, Turkey, the other day, I took a long walk along the Bosporus near Topkapi Palace. There is nothing like standing at this stunning intersection of Europe and Asia to think about the clash of civilizations - and how we might avoid it. Make no mistake: We are living at a remarkable hinge of history, and it's not clear how it's going to swing. What is clear is that Osama bin Laden achieved his aim: 9/11 sparked real tensions between the Judeo-Christian West and the Muslim East.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | April 26, 1995
JERUSALEM -- Soon after the outbreak of World War II, a 13-year-old Parisian youth named Aaron Lustiger converted from Judaism to Catholicism.This week, that long-ago choice brought scathing criticism from Israel's chief rabbi, and the rabbi's rebuke has tainted with controversy tomorrow's Holocaust Remembrance Day in Israel.Aaron Lustiger is now Cardinal Jean-Marie Lustiger, archbishop of Paris and said by some to be a contender for pope.Israel's chief rabbi, Yisrael Lau, said this week that the Catholic official is a traitor who deserves condemnation.
NEWS
October 31, 1994
Shlomo Goren, a former chief rabbi of Israel and an outspoken critic of Israeli reconciliation with the Palestine Liberation Organization, died Saturday after suffering a heart attack. He was 77. Rabbi Goren, who served as Israel's chief rabbi from 1973-1983, was often at the center of controversy. A year ago, he issued a religious ruling that soldiers could refuse orders to dismantle Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank. Rabbi Goren's call for disobedience was given special weight because he served as chief military chaplain during the 1967 Middle East War, reaching the rank of brigadier general.
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