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Chief Medical Officer

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FEATURES
October 18, 2007
Dr. Matt Narrett of Ellicott City has been named executive vice president and chief medical officer of Erickson Retirement Communities, a geriatric health care company based in Baltimore. Dr. Roy Thomas Smoot Jr. has joined Maryland General Hospital as chief medical officer. Smoot is a fellow in the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Carol Greider, professor and director of molecular biology and genetics in the Johns Hopkins Institute of Basic Biomedical Sciences, has been awarded the 2007 Horwitz Prize along with two other researchers.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Dr. William R. Law, a retired Baltimore internist whose career at Bon Secours Hospital spanned more than three decades, died Feb. 20 of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime West Towson resident was 77. The son of an electrical engineer and a homemaker, William Rawlins Law was born in Baltimore and raised in Rodgers Forge. He was a 1953 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1957 from what is now Loyola University Maryland. Dr. Law was a 1962 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and completed both his internship and residency at what is now Mercy Medical Center.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 2, 1992
LONDON -- Britain's chief medical officer has told doctors that they can continue to use silicone gel breast implants despite a temporary suspension of the procedure in the United States.Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended a 45-day moratorium on the supply or use of silicone gel implants while new information questioning their safety is evaluated. Concerns focus on the possibility of reactions in the immune system caused by a leakage of silicone."I understand the concerns and anxiety felt by women over silicone gel breast implants," said Dr. Kenneth Calman, the Department of Health's chief medical officer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 10, 2011
Dr. Edward Selig Kallins, a longtime Baltimore physician who played a pivotal role in the founding of Northwest Hospital Center, died Jan. 1 of a heart attack at Tidewell Hospice and Palliative Care in Bradenton, Fla. The former Pikesville resident was 101. Born Edward Kallinsky in Baltimore, he was the son of prosperous owners of several five-and-dime stores and a men's clothing shop. The family later changed its last name to Kallins. Dr. Kallins was raised at the family home on Eutaw Place and at White Woods, a farm near Parkville, and at a summer home on the Magothy River.
NEWS
April 9, 2001
Buescher elected to board of Union Memorial Dr. Philip C. Buescher, director of the Intensive Care Unit at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore and a resident of Ellicott City, has been elected to the hospital's board of directors. The hospital is a part of MedStar Health, a not-for-profit community-based organization. Berlin is nominated for equality award Lisa M. Berlin, president of Columbia-based Taking Care of Business Inc., has been nominated by the Business Women's Network for the Outstanding Individual Commitment Category of the Equal Business Opportunity Awards.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1995
New positionsGossett and Holthaus head Williams ScotsmanWilliams Scotsman, provider of mobile offices and other portable and modual structures, announced the selections of Barry Gossett as chairman and chief executive officer and Gerry Holthaus as president and chief operations officer. Mr. Gossett is a 25-year veteran of the company. As chairman and chief executive officer, he will focus on acquisition, product development and long-range strategy.Mr. Holthaus, a former senior vice president of MNC Financial, has been with the Baltimore-based company since 1994 and will direct day-to-day operations and assist in strategy and operations development.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Fred Schulte and Julie Bell and Fred Schulte,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2005
When Medicare chief Thomas Scully announced the appointment of Dr. Sean R. Tunis as the federal agency's chief medical officer two years ago, he lauded the Baltimore physician as a man of "excellent judgment." Now, questions of judgment are at the heart of charges pending against Tunis before the Maryland Board of Physicians. The charges put at risk both his license to practice medicine and his job helping oversee Medicare coverage and quality. The charges allege that Tunis lied repeatedly to Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, falsely claiming that he had completed the continuing medical education required to renew his privileges as a moonlighting physician there.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Dr. William R. Law, a retired Baltimore internist whose career at Bon Secours Hospital spanned more than three decades, died Feb. 20 of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime West Towson resident was 77. The son of an electrical engineer and a homemaker, William Rawlins Law was born in Baltimore and raised in Rodgers Forge. He was a 1953 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1957 from what is now Loyola University Maryland. Dr. Law was a 1962 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and completed both his internship and residency at what is now Mercy Medical Center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
Dr. Edward Selig Kallins, a longtime Baltimore physician who played a pivotal role in the founding of Northwest Hospital Center, died Jan. 1 of a heart attack at Tidewell Hospice and Palliative Care in Bradenton, Fla. The former Pikesville resident was 101. Born Edward Kallinsky in Baltimore, he was the son of prosperous owners of several five-and-dime stores and a men's clothing shop. The family later changed its last name to Kallins. Dr. Kallins was raised at the family home on Eutaw Place and at White Woods, a farm near Parkville, and at a summer home on the Magothy River.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
A 20-year decline in male circumcision has cost the country $2 billion in medical costs that could have been prevented, Johns Hopkins researchers say in a study released Monday. In what is believed to be the first look at the economic impact of male circumcision on the health care system, the Hopkins scientists say that boys who are not circumcised are more prone to sexually transmitted diseases and other health problems over a lifetime that are costly to treat. "The economic evidence is backing up what we already know medically," said Dr. Aaron Tobian, a Hopkins health epidemiologist and pathologist and senior researcher on the study.
FEATURES
October 18, 2007
Dr. Matt Narrett of Ellicott City has been named executive vice president and chief medical officer of Erickson Retirement Communities, a geriatric health care company based in Baltimore. Dr. Roy Thomas Smoot Jr. has joined Maryland General Hospital as chief medical officer. Smoot is a fellow in the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Carol Greider, professor and director of molecular biology and genetics in the Johns Hopkins Institute of Basic Biomedical Sciences, has been awarded the 2007 Horwitz Prize along with two other researchers.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Fred Schulte and Julie Bell and Fred Schulte,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2005
When Medicare chief Thomas Scully announced the appointment of Dr. Sean R. Tunis as the federal agency's chief medical officer two years ago, he lauded the Baltimore physician as a man of "excellent judgment." Now, questions of judgment are at the heart of charges pending against Tunis before the Maryland Board of Physicians. The charges put at risk both his license to practice medicine and his job helping oversee Medicare coverage and quality. The charges allege that Tunis lied repeatedly to Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, falsely claiming that he had completed the continuing medical education required to renew his privileges as a moonlighting physician there.
NEWS
April 9, 2001
Buescher elected to board of Union Memorial Dr. Philip C. Buescher, director of the Intensive Care Unit at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore and a resident of Ellicott City, has been elected to the hospital's board of directors. The hospital is a part of MedStar Health, a not-for-profit community-based organization. Berlin is nominated for equality award Lisa M. Berlin, president of Columbia-based Taking Care of Business Inc., has been nominated by the Business Women's Network for the Outstanding Individual Commitment Category of the Equal Business Opportunity Awards.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1995
New positionsGossett and Holthaus head Williams ScotsmanWilliams Scotsman, provider of mobile offices and other portable and modual structures, announced the selections of Barry Gossett as chairman and chief executive officer and Gerry Holthaus as president and chief operations officer. Mr. Gossett is a 25-year veteran of the company. As chairman and chief executive officer, he will focus on acquisition, product development and long-range strategy.Mr. Holthaus, a former senior vice president of MNC Financial, has been with the Baltimore-based company since 1994 and will direct day-to-day operations and assist in strategy and operations development.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 2, 1992
LONDON -- Britain's chief medical officer has told doctors that they can continue to use silicone gel breast implants despite a temporary suspension of the procedure in the United States.Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended a 45-day moratorium on the supply or use of silicone gel implants while new information questioning their safety is evaluated. Concerns focus on the possibility of reactions in the immune system caused by a leakage of silicone."I understand the concerns and anxiety felt by women over silicone gel breast implants," said Dr. Kenneth Calman, the Department of Health's chief medical officer.
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