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NEWS
April 13, 2013
In addition to holding the position of chief judge on the Maryland Court of Appeals, Robert M. Bell is the representative for the Baltimore City circuit. Applications for the city seat are due May 1, and those who apply will be interviewed by bar groups and a judicial nominating commission. The commission will meet June 24 to produce a list of qualified applicants to be forwarded to Gov. Martin O'Malley. His appointment must be confirmed by the Maryland Senate. O'Malley will also appoint a chief judge of the Court of Appeals.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
Maryland's highest-ranking judge, Robert M. Bell, likes that his courthouse is dedicated to his predecessor, pointing out that the letters etching Robert C. Murphy's name on the building's exterior are filled in gold paint to make sure even nighttime drivers can see it. As Bell approaches retirement, mandatory when he turns 70 in July, he scoffs at the notion that his name might someday grace a building as well. But then, his name is forever etched in legal history by virtue of the Supreme Court case Bell v. Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Roland Walker, a colorful and highly regarded defense attorney who was a fixture in Baltimore courtrooms for six decades, died Saturday of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at his Lutherville home. He was 82. "Roland was always a person's lawyer. He represented people, not organizations or institutions, and he did it brilliantly," said Joseph F. Murphy Jr., former chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals. "He did mainly criminal defense work and always had a wonderful way with people, judges and jurors.
EXPLORE
By C. Philip Nichols Jr | February 7, 2013
I read with great interest your article Jan. 31 about Laurel's first bank robbery by John Morgan. Sadly, this was not our last bank robbery and just as sadly, not the last 19-year-old to go to prison from our county. A quick review by the state archivist, Dr. Edwin Papenfuse, brings us the "rest of the story. " (By the way, if every part of government was as efficient or accommodating as the state archives, there would not be much to complain about.) The Hon. Chief Judge John P. Briscoe of our Circuit Court sentenced Morgan to five years in the state penitentiary, notwithstanding the recommendation for leniency by the bank president, Charles H. Stanley Sr. Several months later, Morgan's sister Gertrude, who was a nurse at St. Joseph's Hospital, applied to the governor to pardon her brother.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
E.R. Shipp's commentary on Morgan State University's growth as well as reminders of what happened in and around Morgan is much appreciated, especially by one who was witness to Morgan's growth in the 1950s and 1960s ("Moving on by moving up," Dec. 5). I taught history at Morgan from 1955 until 1967, and one thing I think was missing from the article is giving credit to the remarkable leaders who were responsible for Morgan's growth and increasing reputation. Among those who need to be mentioned are Morgan's president, Martin D. Jenkins, the nationally-recognized author and historian Benjamin Quarles, and the nationally-recognized collector of African art James E. Lewis.
NEWS
By Laurie Duker | November 1, 2012
More than 70,000 Maryland women become victims of domestic violence each year, but only a fraction of these women seek protective orders from our state's courts. If we want to do more to protect women, we need to make it easier and safer for them to get such orders. Alarmingly, sometimes women actually put themselves at risk just by going to court. Consider the case of a Montgomery County resident whose estranged boyfriend had repeatedly beaten and threatened her. When this woman finished her court hearing and had received her protective order, she began walking to her car alone.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
A lawsuit challenging both the Maryland Court of Appeals ruling that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous" and a Baltimore landlord's decision to ban the animals from its property to avoid liabilities created under the ruling was recently amended to include the state's governor, attorney general and chief appeals judge as defendants. Gov. Martin O'Malley, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Chief Judge Robert M. Bell are all being sued personally but within their official capacities, according to the amended complaint, which was filed Sunday night.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
Suzanne K. Mensh, who served Baltimore County for nearly five decades as an Orphans' Court judge and then as clerk of the county Circuit Court, died Wednesday at Northwest Hospital. Her family said no cause of death was given. She was 82. "She was a sincere lady," said a son, Spencer Mensh of Reisterstown. "The first word that comes to mind with her is 'integrity.'" Judge Mensh was encouraged to run for office by members of a local Democratic club who worked with her at polling locations, her son said.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Suzanne K. Mensh, who ran Baltimore County's orphans' court for two decades and served as Circuit Court clerk for six terms, died Wednesday at Northwest Hospital. Her family said no cause of death was given. Mensh, 82, had been admitted to the hospital four days earlier because of her deteriorating physical condition, said a son, Spencer Mensh of Reisterstown. "She loved, heart and soul, what she did," he said by phone Friday. Mensh served as the clerk of the Baltimore County Circuit Court from 1986 until May 2010.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for sunny skies, with a high temperature near 78 degrees. It is expected to be clear tonight, with a low temperature around 50 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Baltimore County unions oppose Kamenetz pension bill : Public-employee unions are urging Baltimore County Council members to reject a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that would cut pension benefits for some workers, saying it sends a bad message to labor leaders and undermines negotiations.
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