Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChief Judge
IN THE NEWS

Chief Judge

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Chief Judge Mary Ellen Barbera found herself in an interesting position last week as she testified before lawmakers about how Maryland's courts will meet a constitutional mandate that defendants get a lawyer when their bail is first set. As a member of the state's highest court, Barbera wrote a forceful dissent to a decision that could dramatically change the way the state treats defendants before trial. But as the state's top judge, Barbera also faces the administrative task of carrying out that ruling.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2010
Baltimore Judge Martin P. Welch, who's served on the city's circuit court for 18 years, has become the new chief judge, replacing John N. Prevas, who died of a heart attack Monday. The title is bestowed on the most senior judge, who then presides over judicial ceremonies and signs official correspondence, including summonses. It doesn't come with a salary increase — just prestige. Welch, who was named to the post Tuesday, is thought to be the city's second black chief judge, behind Clifton J. Gordy, who briefly held the post in 2006 before retiring.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
A federal appeals judge recently took aim at the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' use of fictitious drug robbery schemes to secure lengthy prison sentences for would-be rip off crews, strongly criticizing the practice in a written opinion. The so-called reverse stings follow a pattern: An informant or undercover agent poses as a disgruntled courier and invites a group of people to rob his employer of a half-million dollars or so worth of drugs. But Judge Stephen Reinhardt wrote that such tactics raise important issues about wealth inequality in the United States and whom authorities decide to pursue.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The disagreement between Mary Ellen Barbera and Glenn T. Harrell Jr. made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, but that didn't stop them from meeting for lunch in Washington after oral arguments in the case. Barbera and Harrell, both judges on Maryland's highest court, were on opposite sides of a hard-fought case over the collection of DNA from suspects arrested for violent crimes. Harrell wrote the majority opinion striking down the practice; Barbera criticized his reasoning in a dissent.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 26, 2010
Judge John Prevas loved the music of rockers Steely Dan and sang most Wednesdays at Southeast Baltimore karaoke bars. He was recalled Tuesday as an old-school, tough jurist who knew his law inside and out and could also argue baseball trivia with the best. Judge Prevas, the chief judge of the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, died of a heart attack Monday night at Mercy Medical Center. He was 63. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski called the judge "a friend, an adviser," adding that "Baltimore has lost a truly great man. " Born in Baltimore, he was the son of an attorney, Konstantine "Gus" Prevas, who survives him and lives in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
Maryland's highest-ranking judge, Robert M. Bell, likes that his courthouse is dedicated to his predecessor, pointing out that the letters etching Robert C. Murphy's name on the building's exterior are filled in gold paint to make sure even nighttime drivers can see it. As Bell approaches retirement, mandatory when he turns 70 in July, he scoffs at the notion that his name might someday grace a building as well. But then, his name is forever etched in legal history by virtue of the Supreme Court case Bell v. Maryland.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | January 24, 1991
Judge Alexander Harvey 2nd plans to step down March 8 as chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Baltimore and become a senior judge.His successor, Judge Walter E. Black Jr., 64, is to be sworn in as chief judge in a ceremony that day.Harvey, 67, has been chief judge for five years. He has been on the federal bench for more than 25 years after being originally appointed by President Johnson.Harvey could have retained the chief judgeship until his 70th birthday. But he said yesterday relinquishing the post to become a senior judge would open another full-time judgeship on the busy district bench, something he feels is needed with the pending construction of the so-called "southern district" wing of the court in the Washington suburbs.
NEWS
November 28, 1991
Hall Hammond, a dominant figure in the Maryland judicial system for decades before his retirement as the state's chief judge in 1972, died early yesterday of cancer at his home in the Ruxton Village Apartments. He was 89.Described yesterday by one former associate as a "titan" and "one of the shining lights" of his profession, Judge Hammond served on the state Court of Appeals for 20 years, the last six as chief judge.Judge Hammond had served as Maryland attorney general from 1946 until being named to the state's highest court in 1952.
NEWS
June 30, 2006
Ailene W. Hutchins, a former educator and Orphans' Court judge who wrote widely about her native Calvert County, died in her sleep June 23 at her home in Prince Frederick. She was 86. Ailene Williams was born and raised on her family's farm near Barstow, and graduated from Calvert County High School. At 19, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1939 from Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College. She taught French, English and drama at Calvert County High, and was the school's guidance counselor from 1951 to 1963.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A judge from Prince George's County has been named the next chief judge of the state's District Court. Judge John P. Morrissey, 49, who has served as an associate judge since 2005, will succeed District Court Chief Judge Ben C. Clyburn when Clyburn retires next month. Morrissey, who was born in Washington, D.C. and has lived in P.G. County for more than 40 years, will oversee the court's 34 locations and nearly 2,000 employees, including 116 state judges. The court is typically the first point of contact for members of the public who interact with the state courts system.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Chief Judge Mary Ellen Barbera found herself in an interesting position last week as she testified before lawmakers about how Maryland's courts will meet a constitutional mandate that defendants get a lawyer when their bail is first set. As a member of the state's highest court, Barbera wrote a forceful dissent to a decision that could dramatically change the way the state treats defendants before trial. But as the state's top judge, Barbera also faces the administrative task of carrying out that ruling.
NEWS
By Stephen H. Sachs | November 21, 2013
We got the dreadful news of the president's murder at a retirement luncheon at the old House of Welsh for our boss, United States Attorney Joseph Tydings. Stunned and subdued, we straggled back to our fourth floor offices in the nearby United States Post Office and Courthouse. None of us had ever met JFK, but we were unmistakably caught up in the Kennedy call to public service, and we all felt, through Joe, a link to the president. Most of us knew that Joe had been to the White House earlier that week to receive a presidential blessing for his forthcoming campaign for the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 22, 2013
The $10,000 in U.S. savings bonds that Tom Karle discovered in a house he renovated in Northeast Baltimore are now in the possession of Robert Gorham, the young man for whom they were purchased in the 1990s. But an element of mystery lingers in the story. As reported in this space on July 9, Karle, a city landlord, came across the bonds in a house he had purchased from the city of Baltimore at auction. The end-of-group rowhouse was a mess, requiring Karle and his workers to remove seven truckloads of trash from it as they began renovations.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The disagreement between Mary Ellen Barbera and Glenn T. Harrell Jr. made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, but that didn't stop them from meeting for lunch in Washington after oral arguments in the case. Barbera and Harrell, both judges on Maryland's highest court, were on opposite sides of a hard-fought case over the collection of DNA from suspects arrested for violent crimes. Harrell wrote the majority opinion striking down the practice; Barbera criticized his reasoning in a dissent.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Maryland achieved several milestones Tuesday as Gov. Martin O'Malley named the first woman to lead what will be the first female majority on the state's top court. The appointments, announced Wednesday in Annapolis, mark a shift in a male-dominated profession and put Maryland among a minority of states with their highest courts led by women. "In every generation we make progress toward the sort of country we want our kids to grow up in," O'Malley said. O'Malley elevated Court of Appeals Judge Mary Ellen Barbera to be chief - the highest-ranking judge in Maryland - and he appointed Court of Special Appeals Judge Shirley M. Watts to take the seat of retiring Chief Judge Robert M. Bell.
NEWS
March 2, 2003
Chief Judge Bell honored for efforts on conflict resolution Maryland's chief judge, Robert M. Bell, will receive an award this month from the American Bar Association for "advancing the appropriate use of mediation and other non-adversarial forms of conflict resolution in the court system and in the wider community," the ABA said yesterday. The award will be presented March 21 in San Antonio. Bell created a commission in 1998 and then a state office to take nonconfrontational methods of conflict resolution to courts, schools and communities.
NEWS
By James B. Astrachan, George W. Liebmann, and Henry R. Lord | June 10, 2013
The retirement next month of Chief Judge Robert M. Bell of the Maryland Court of Appeals is a critical event, the first transition in the leadership of Maryland's courts in nearly 20 years. A matter of central importance for the new chief judge must be the shocking state of the docket of the state's highest court, a problem that long predates Chief Judge Bell's stewardship. Article IV, Section 15 of the Maryland Constitution requires that "an opinion, in writing, shall be filed within three months after the argument or submission of the cause.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.