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By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
Susan Gaffney, the chief investigator at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, whose plans for a fraud probe in Baltimore sparked charges of racism from former Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke three years ago, announced her retirement yesterday. Gaffney, 57, said she plans to retire "in about a month" after 22 years in the federal government. In 1993, former President Bill Clinton named her HUD inspector general, an independent post that supervises a nationwide staff of auditors and criminal investigators.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
In Anne Arundel County, public relations appear to go hand-in-hand with police work. Arrested the nephew of an Annapolis mayoral candidate? Run that up the ranks to the chief. A television producer wants to interview a detective about gangs? “HIGHLY” recommend a public information officer sits in and “ensure he stays on course.” Make sure the chief signs off on that, too. The Anne Arundel County Police Department released hundreds of emails this month detailing interactions with the media.
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NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1998
The chief investigator for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development goes to Capitol Hill today to defend the major criminal probes she plans for Baltimore and two other cities.HUD inspector general Susan Gaffney, whose critics have said her targeting of Baltimore, San Francisco and New Orleans is racially and politically motivated, is expected to speak extensively in public for the first time about the investigations, which were prompted by Congress.As the U.S. Conference of Mayors joined Gaffney's critics yesterday, sources said she would detail her defense today at a hearing called to assess the effectiveness of inspectors general in the 20 years since the watchdog job was created in Cabinet departments.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
The election fraud trial of veteran political consultant Julius Henson was postponed Wednesday because of the illness of the state's primary investigator in the case. Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown postponed the trial, which centers on an Election Day 2010 robocall, until Feb. 23, when jury selection is expected to begin. Prosecutors believe Special Agent John C. Poliks will have recovered enough by then to participate in the trial. Lawyers in the case finished a motions hearing on Tuesday, during which one of three conspiracy charges against Henson was dismissed because Brown deemed it repetitive.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Taking the gloves off in an increasingly hostile confrontation, the chief investigator for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development accused its secretary, Andrew M. Cuomo, of "a series of attacks and dirty tricks" designed to force her resignation.Susan Gaffney, the inspector general, spoke at a Senate committee hearing yesterday, where she pleaded for help from Congress in fending off Cuomo's attempts to curb her independence, undermine her office's work and to begin conducting criminal investigations, a responsibility she now has.Appearing before the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee, she also charged that a Cuomo aide had sought "amnesty" from the Justice Department for the targets of a six-year investigation by her office into the spending of "millions and millions" of dollars in HUD funds.
NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | October 28, 1994
Thomas O. Martin, a retired state investigator and FBI agent who worked on the famous Brink's robbery, died Tuesday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital of a heart attack after surgery. He was 73.In appointing Mr. Martin chief investigator of the newly formed state prosecutor's office in 1978, Gerald D. Glass described him as a "relentless worker." Mr. Glass headed the office.At that time, Mr. Martin declared that he wanted to get "back in my own element, criminal fraud, the fraud element of accounting."
NEWS
By Dennis M. Sweeney | July 21, 2008
Maryland State Police didn't do their homework before they started spying on peace activists and anti-death-penalty groups. If the amateur spymasters had read up on their Maryland law enforcement history before launching this escapade, they might have had a good laugh and learned a thing or two. They would have discovered that similar surveillance efforts went awry for a state law enforcement unit that included troopers more than a half-century ago....
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
In Anne Arundel County, public relations appear to go hand-in-hand with police work. Arrested the nephew of an Annapolis mayoral candidate? Run that up the ranks to the chief. A television producer wants to interview a detective about gangs? “HIGHLY” recommend a public information officer sits in and “ensure he stays on course.” Make sure the chief signs off on that, too. The Anne Arundel County Police Department released hundreds of emails this month detailing interactions with the media.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Madison Park and Justin Fenton and Madison Park,Sun reporters | June 21, 2007
The state investigator heading a probe involving the Aberdeen city government has deep political roots in Harford County, leading some of those subpoenaed in the case and watchdog groups to raise questions about a potential conflict of interest. Stephen M. Wright, an accountant whose no-bid contract with the city is among the documents subpoenaed by the office of the state prosecutor, said he has contacted State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh and the agency's chief investigator to complain, while the city's mayor is calling the investigation politically motivated.
NEWS
By Staff Report | February 5, 1993
George H. Roth, who had been an FBI agent, chief of investigations for the National Security Agency and an aide to Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his home in Preston.Mr. Roth, who was 65 and had lived in Glen Burnie before moving to Preston about 20 years ago, owned the Gulf Intelligence Agency, which handled private investigations.He had retired in 1972 as chief of investigations for the National Security Agency, a post he held since the late 1950s. He had served as a special agent of the FBI from 1950 until 1957.
NEWS
By Dennis M. Sweeney | July 21, 2008
Maryland State Police didn't do their homework before they started spying on peace activists and anti-death-penalty groups. If the amateur spymasters had read up on their Maryland law enforcement history before launching this escapade, they might have had a good laugh and learned a thing or two. They would have discovered that similar surveillance efforts went awry for a state law enforcement unit that included troopers more than a half-century ago....
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Madison Park and Justin Fenton and Madison Park,Sun reporters | June 21, 2007
The state investigator heading a probe involving the Aberdeen city government has deep political roots in Harford County, leading some of those subpoenaed in the case and watchdog groups to raise questions about a potential conflict of interest. Stephen M. Wright, an accountant whose no-bid contract with the city is among the documents subpoenaed by the office of the state prosecutor, said he has contacted State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh and the agency's chief investigator to complain, while the city's mayor is calling the investigation politically motivated.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Two detectives on the security detail of former city Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris testified yesterday before a federal grand jury investigating the actions of their former boss and his use of a little-known, off-the-books expense account. The two officers, Maj. Anthony Barksdale and Sgt. Michael Mancuso, declined to comment after their testimony. Barksdale testified for about an hour; Mancuso was in the grand jury room for about 30 minutes. Mancuso's lawyer, Henry Belsky, said his client is cooperating with investigators.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2001
Carol Brown does not feel she should be out $4,000 for mistakes she thinks somebody else made. Hundreds of her Eldersburg neighbors, who paid $1,000 or more to fix pipes ravaged by pinhole leaks, feel the same way. They say that Carroll County caused the leaks by removing pipe-protecting agents from its water and that the county should repay South Carroll residents for the repairs. But no one has taken responsibility for the leaks, and similar problems in other water systems have led researchers to develop so many theories that assigning blame could prove tricky at best.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
Susan Gaffney, the chief investigator at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, whose plans for a fraud probe in Baltimore sparked charges of racism from former Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke three years ago, announced her retirement yesterday. Gaffney, 57, said she plans to retire "in about a month" after 22 years in the federal government. In 1993, former President Bill Clinton named her HUD inspector general, an independent post that supervises a nationwide staff of auditors and criminal investigators.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
Federal housing officials violated government regulations last year and made extraordinary efforts to manipulate and control an employment discrimination investigation aimed at HUD's chief investigator, congressional investigators charged in a report released yesterday.Then, they tried to impede an investigation of their actions, according to the document issued by the General Accounting Office.The report was the latest development in a long-running feud between Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew M. Cuomo and Inspector General Susan Gaffney.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
The election fraud trial of veteran political consultant Julius Henson was postponed Wednesday because of the illness of the state's primary investigator in the case. Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown postponed the trial, which centers on an Election Day 2010 robocall, until Feb. 23, when jury selection is expected to begin. Prosecutors believe Special Agent John C. Poliks will have recovered enough by then to participate in the trial. Lawyers in the case finished a motions hearing on Tuesday, during which one of three conspiracy charges against Henson was dismissed because Brown deemed it repetitive.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Department of Justice is investigating allegations that FBI Director William S. Sessions permitted his wife and his special assistant to misuse power, sources familiar with the inquiry said last night.ABC News also reported yesterday that the probe involved possible ethics violations involving government-paid travel.Quoting sources familiar with the inquiry, the network said investigators are checking "Sessions' travel records and those of his wife, Alice, to see whether government autos, airplanes and personnel have been used for private purposes."
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
NEW YORK -- Scrambling to contain a scandal, the International Olympic Committee's chief investigator of the Salt Lake City bid promised yesterday to deliver a report that will contain frank admissions of wrongdoing and specific recommendations for reform, but no criminal allegations.Packages of cash and gifts worth $100,000 and more were common in Salt Lake City's winning bid for the 2002 Winter Games, Richard W. Pound, vice president of the IOC, told the Associated Press yesterday."Some of the members, but not all, received gifts in six figures," he was quoted as saying.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Taking the gloves off in an increasingly hostile confrontation, the chief investigator for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development accused its secretary, Andrew M. Cuomo, of "a series of attacks and dirty tricks" designed to force her resignation.Susan Gaffney, the inspector general, spoke at a Senate committee hearing yesterday, where she pleaded for help from Congress in fending off Cuomo's attempts to curb her independence, undermine her office's work and to begin conducting criminal investigations, a responsibility she now has.Appearing before the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee, she also charged that a Cuomo aide had sought "amnesty" from the Justice Department for the targets of a six-year investigation by her office into the spending of "millions and millions" of dollars in HUD funds.
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